Back to Back to the Future

It’s a fairly well known bit of trivia among Back to the Future fans: When production was just getting under way, director Robert Zemeckis spent four weeks filming with Eric Stoltz in the lead before he decided the part had been miscast. He dropped Stoltz and brought on Michael J. Fox.¬†That, of course, turned out to be exactly the right decision. These days, it’s bizarre to imagine anyone but Fox playing Marty McFly.

At the time, though, it wasn’t an easy choice. For one thing, actress Melora Hardin became collateral damage in that changeover — she was considered too tall to play Fox’s love interest, so she was let go before she shot a single scene. Producer Bob Gale that conversation with Hardin “the hardest thing I ever had to do,” and said he was “sick about it for days.”

In real life, of course, Gale can’t change the way things turned out. But in fiction, he’s received a chance to do just that.¬†David Guy Levy‘s comic Back to Back to the Future imagines Gale and Hardin accidentally sent back in time, where they decide to keep Stoltz from ever getting replaced. The first issue is available for free on the web now. Hit the jump to learn more about it.

Read More »

.

Please Recommend /Film on Facebook

One of the best known bits of trivia about Back to the Future is that Eric Stoltz not only almost played Marty McFly, but he actually filmed four weeks of the film as Marty before director Robert Zemeckis decided that he had been miscast. Footage of Stoltz has been under lock and key, never to be released to the public… until now.
Read More »

DVD Review: Caprica

Caprica

If Battlestar Galactica asked the question “How would humanity survive a holocaust led by our most advanced technology?”, Caprica asks “At what point does our need for progress supplant our humanity?” Even though it’s set a mere 58 years before the events of the Galactica series, Caprica has a startlingly different tone. It makes sense, I suppose, since there are no Cylons hunting humans down to extinction (yet). Instead, Caprica gives us a look at a society on the brink of civilization-changing technological discoveries—with all of the hubris that follows unchecked progress.

For those confused by the release of Caprica, the DVD and digital download being released today is actually an uncut version of the 90-minute pilot. The series proper won’t start airing until early 2010, at which point we’ll also see a more tame version of the pilot aired as well. I’m not sure about the logic in waiting so long to premiere the series—Sci-Fi is aching for new content and BSG is the closest thing they’ve had to a hit in some time. It would make more sense to try and get this on the air by Fall 2009. Then again, this is the same network that spread the release of the fourth Galactica across 2008 and 2009 for no good reason. Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web: