Eric Stoltz Back to the Future footage

Sick of Back to the Future yet? I hope not, but Back to the Future Day, which celebrated the date Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) traveled 30 years into the future at the end of the first film, is now over. It’s a well known fact it was originally going to be Eric Stoltz (Mask) going on adventures with Dr. Emmett Brown (Christopher Lloyd), but the actor was recast four weeks into the shoot. After all these years, we might finally see his performance. Learn more after the jump.

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Back to the Future: The Ultimate Visual History

The holy grail for most movie geeks is J. W. Rinzler’s The Making of Star Wars and Indiana Jones books, which offer in-depth looks at the making of some of the greatest films of all time. But it’s rare for films to get this kind of treatment, which is why it’s so great to see that Michael Klastorin‘s Back to the Future: The Ultimate Visual History does just that.

If you are a Back to the Future fan, this book will blow you away. I’m a hardcore obsessive who thought I knew and saw everything having to do with the film, but almost every other page of this book had a quote or an image that I had never seen before. To help promote the book’s release this week, I thought I’d take a look at the 11 coolest things I found in this book. Hit the jump to go 88mph and see some never-before-seen photos from behind the scenes of Back to the Future. And by the way, you can order the book now on Amazon.
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Back in Time trailer

Robert Zemeckis has never talked much about recasting Eric Stoltz in Back to the Future. The actor was completely wrong for the movie, and after a few weeks of shooting, Zemeckis decided to recast the role. To see the director of this weekend’s The Walk discuss the casting change, check out the video after the jump.

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Eric Stoltz in Back to the Future

Among Back to the Future fans, it’s a well-known fact that Michael J. Fox wasn’t the first actor cast as Marty McFly. Eric Stoltz had already shot a significant portion of the film before producers decided it wasn’t working out. They fired him and went back to their first choice, Fox, who’d been unavailable due to scheduling conflicts.

You wouldn’t know that just by watching the film, as all of Stoltz’s scenes were re-shot with Fox. However, if you were looking really, really carefully, you may have noticed a tiny bit of Stoltz’s footage remains in the finished film. Find out where you can see Eric Stoltz in Back to the Future after the jump.  Read More »

Jurassic World Frank Marshall interview

The week before Jurassic World hit theaters, I was able to get mega-producer Frank Marshall on the phone to talk not only about the new Jurassic Park sequel/reboot, but about a variety of other topics as well.

During the conversation we discussed the idea of weaponized dinosaurs, how he came to produce this movie (which has something to do with Star Wars), the cynical online fanboy reaction throughout the development, the Amblin feel of the movie, how the project evolved from earlier drafts, why the previous screenwriters Rick Jaffa and Amanda Silver are still credited on the film after Colin Trevorrow and Derek Connelly did a page one rewrite, the battle of practical vs. cg effects, planning for further sequels, Spielberg’s idea for trained raptors, how Jimmy Buffet ended up in the movie, if Universal Studios will be making a Jurassic World ride for their parks.

I ask him about some of the projects he has on his plate, which include new Bourne movies, a big-screen adaptation of Assassin’s Creed, and Indiana Jones 5. I also ask about the 30th anniversary of Back to the Future, a film for which Marshall acted as producer and second unit director. (I got some details on that latter gig.) All this and more is in my Frank Marshall interview, which you can read after the jump.

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Back to Back to the Future

It’s a fairly well known bit of trivia among Back to the Future fans: When production was just getting under way, director Robert Zemeckis spent four weeks filming with Eric Stoltz in the lead before he decided the part had been miscast. He dropped Stoltz and brought on Michael J. Fox. That, of course, turned out to be exactly the right decision. These days, it’s bizarre to imagine anyone but Fox playing Marty McFly.

At the time, though, it wasn’t an easy choice. For one thing, actress Melora Hardin became collateral damage in that changeover — she was considered too tall to play Fox’s love interest, so she was let go before she shot a single scene. Producer Bob Gale that conversation with Hardin “the hardest thing I ever had to do,” and said he was “sick about it for days.”

In real life, of course, Gale can’t change the way things turned out. But in fiction, he’s received a chance to do just that. David Guy Levy‘s comic Back to Back to the Future imagines Gale and Hardin accidentally sent back in time, where they decide to keep Stoltz from ever getting replaced. The first issue is available for free on the web now. Hit the jump to learn more about it.

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One of the best known bits of trivia about Back to the Future is that Eric Stoltz not only almost played Marty McFly, but he actually filmed four weeks of the film as Marty before director Robert Zemeckis decided that he had been miscast. Footage of Stoltz has been under lock and key, never to be released to the public… until now.
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DVD Review: Caprica


If Battlestar Galactica asked the question “How would humanity survive a holocaust led by our most advanced technology?”, Caprica asks “At what point does our need for progress supplant our humanity?” Even though it’s set a mere 58 years before the events of the Galactica series, Caprica has a startlingly different tone. It makes sense, I suppose, since there are no Cylons hunting humans down to extinction (yet). Instead, Caprica gives us a look at a society on the brink of civilization-changing technological discoveries—with all of the hubris that follows unchecked progress.

For those confused by the release of Caprica, the DVD and digital download being released today is actually an uncut version of the 90-minute pilot. The series proper won’t start airing until early 2010, at which point we’ll also see a more tame version of the pilot aired as well. I’m not sure about the logic in waiting so long to premiere the series—Sci-Fi is aching for new content and BSG is the closest thing they’ve had to a hit in some time. It would make more sense to try and get this on the air by Fall 2009. Then again, this is the same network that spread the release of the fourth Galactica across 2008 and 2009 for no good reason. Read More »