Legendary composer Ennio Morricone has some choice words for one of his biggest fans, Quentin Tarantino. The composer behind such movie music masterworks as The Good, The Bad and The Ugly and The Mission has his music prominently used in Tarantino’s latest film, Django Unchained. However, Morricone recently stated that he doesn’t like how Tarantino works with music and wouldn’t work with him again. Read his quotes below. Read More »

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Quentin Tarantino and Jamie Foxx were part of the BET awards tonight, and they didn’t show up empty-handed. A new 60-second spot for Tarantino’s upcoming movie Django Unchained debuted during the show, and has now appeared online.

This spot features a new overt nod to classic spaghetti westerns, as the beginning of the spot features some of Ennio Morricone’s track ‘The Ecstasy of Gold,’ as heard in the climax of The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. (There’s a beat thrown over the track; could that be some RZA work? Edit: nope, and it’s not Jay-Z’s ‘Blueprint2,’ it sounds like the Baldini remix of the Morricone theme. )

The ad also has one of the few brief flashes we’ve seen of Samuel L. Jackson in his role for the film, as well as a couple other small bits of new footage. This year’s got a lot of life in it yet, but Tarantino’s picture is one good reason to look forward to December.

Check out the spot below. Read More »

Ennio Morricone Now Composing Ringtones for LG

When film fans hear the word “composer,” we immediately think of a film composer. Maybe our minds even drift to some of our favorite scores by the likes of John Williams, Bernard Herrmann, Hans Zimmer or Jerry Goldsmith. When that happens, it’s easy to forget that a composer can write music for things other than movies.

So in an age where almost everyone’s life is run through their cell phone, it makes almost perfect sense that a great film composer is going to the digital medium. Ennio Morricone, the legendary Italian composer who has written scores for hundreds of films including Cinema Paradiso, The Good The Bad and The Ugly as well as The Untouchables, has signed a deal with LG to not only write brand new music for ringtones on their upcoming smart phones, but allow those phones to exclusively play some of his most famous themes. Read more about this deal after the jump. Read More »

harold-faltermeyer-for-hunter

If the ’80s gave a sniffling speech at the Decade Achievement Awards, Harold Faltermeyer and his scores would be thanked somewhere after Shigeru Miyamoto and Super Mario Bros. and Magic Johnson’s Lakers. A classically trained German composer with an affinity for rock and disco, Faltermeyer got his start in Hollywood assisting mustachioed electro-don Georgio Moroder on soundtracks for Oliver Stone’s provocative Midnight Express and Adrian Lyne’s jail-bait fave Foxes. With the release of Beverly Hills Cop in 1984, everyone acknowledges how Faltermeyer’s theme song, “Axel F,” hopped into bed with America’s zeitgeist like few songs before or since. The track’s equation of urgent nightlife synths plus cool-black-dude drum effects, then buffered to an upbeat Cali finish, not only paralleled the confident, crowd-pleaser m.o. of sure-shot producers Jerry Bruckheimer and Don Simpson, it embodied and celebrated it.

Soon following “Axel F,” Faltermeyer crafted incredibly memorable and fun themes/scores for Fletch and Top Gun, rising to the occasion by sonically matching the unmatched charisma of Chevy Chase and Tom Cruise on screen in the mid ’80s. Reflecting on the three themes today, not to mention his work on actioners The Running Man and Tango & Cash, it’s difficult to express how Faltermeyer shaped the way audiences then and now remember the ’80s as a time of just-plain-exciting innocence and excess, a time when the buddy-cop formula and toothy superstar grins felt fresh. It’s this feeling and nostalgia Kevin Smith is paying pop-homage to with Cop Out, another bid for a mainstream hit from the ’90s slacker auteur starring Bruce Willis and Tracy Morgan. Smith personally requested Faltermeyer—who’s remained inactive on major soundtracks since the ’92 copper Kuffs—score the film with his signature sound. The catchy result is felt by several critics to be the best thing about the action-comedy. (Stream it here.)

In an interview with /Film, Faltermeyer talked about his creative process and about “crazy shit” including the late Don Simpson’s finesse with a Ferrari.

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/FilmCast

In this special episode of the /Filmcast, Dan Trachtenberg from The Totally Rad Show joins David Chen to geek out about their favorite soundtracks. To listen to all of the songs that Dan mentioned during this episode in their entirety, click here to go to Grooveshark. To listen to all of the songs that Dave Chen mentioned during this episode, click here.

Like what you hear? Want to hear similar episodes in the future? Send feedback to slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993. One correction to note: the last track that is played, “Fantasia on a Theme By Thomas Tallis” was composed by Ralph Vaughn Williams. Eugene Ormany, who we mention, conducts the orchestral performance.

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Update: Some people have reported experiencing audio problems with this sound file. Please try downloading the file to your computer, rather than playing it in your browser. That should fix the problem (If it does not, shoot me an e-mail or leave a comment below). Thanks!
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