Academy-Award winner and current nominee Christoph Waltz hosted Saturday Night Live over the weekend and used the occasion to poke fun at his two-time collaborator, Quentin Tarantino. The SNL team created a sketched called Djesus Uncrossed starring Waltz as Jesus, back from the dead and hell bent on revenge. It features obvious and hilarious references to Kill Bill, Pulp Fiction, Inglourious Basterds and, of course, Django Unchained. Check it out below. Read More »

.

Please Recommend /Film on Facebook

The last time we previewed any material from the comic adaptation of Quentin Tarantino‘s original script for Django Unchained, the film wasn’t out yet. So it wasn’t easy to talk about how the comic exists as a piece of storytelling related to the movie. Now, we’re a couple months into the movie’s life as a near-immediate cultural touchstone, so it’s safe to guess that most people at least have some idea of the story’s basics.

The comic promises to have some scenes that didn’t make the film’s final cut, with interior art rendered by R.M. Guéra (Scalped) and Jason Latour. The second issue of the adaptation hits tomorrow, February 13, but you can get a look at a few pages below. The pages in question include the comic rendition Dr. Schultz’s explanation of the origin of Broomhilda’s name.

Read More »

We’ve got a bunch of cool movie art for you today. The Academy and Gallery1988 commissioned a small group of artists to create original screen prints inspired by this year’s nine Best Picture nominees. After the jump you can see some of them, including:

 AMOUR by artist Matt Owen, ARGO by Anthony Petrie, BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD by Rich Kelly, DJANGO UNCHAINED by Mark Englert, LES MISÉRABLES by Phantom City Creative, LINCOLN by Jeff Boyes, LIFE OF PI by Tom Whalen, SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK by Joshua Budich and ZERO DARK THIRTY by Godmachine.

Gallery1988 has tweeted that “this is just the start” and there will be “more soon” including a tweet teasing the appearance of popular artist Olly Moss.  The G1988 x The Academy show will run February 14th to the 17, with more details coming soon. See the first batch of art after the jump.

Read More »

Although Quentin Tarantino‘s works aren’t overtly linked like, say, the films of the Marvel Cinematic Universe are, his devoted fans know they’re all connected in smaller, subtler ways. Perhaps the most famous association is between Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction — Mr. Blonde (Michael Madsen) and Vincent Vega (John Travolta) are brothers — but there’s also the offhand mention of True Romance‘s Alabama (Patricia Arquette) in Reservoir Dogs, the familial relationship between Ingourious Basterds‘ Donnie Donowitz (Eli Roth) and True Romance‘s Lee Donowitz (Saul Rubinek), and so on.

Tarantino’s latest, Django Unchained, takes place a century before all those other films, making it a little more difficult to connect it to the rest of his oeuvre. But fear not, Tarantino lovers — the master filmmaker has found a way. Hit the jump to find out what it is.

Read More »

This podcast contains spoilers for Django Unchained and Zero Dark Thirty.

Dave, Devindra, and Adam chat with film critic Armond White about Quentin Tarantino’s work in Django Unchained, as well as why Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance and Taken 2 are better films than Zero Dark Thirty. Be sure to check out Armond’s Django review, as well as his “Better Than” list for 2012. 

You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993.
Read More »

For the 70th year, the Hollywood Foreign Press handed out their Golden Globe Awards Sunday night. Hosts Tina Fey and Amy Poehler entertained an audience of TV and movie fans there to bestow awards to shows like Girls, Modern Family, Smash, Breaking Bad, Homeland and Downton Abbey and films like Lincoln, Argo, Django Unchained, Life of Pi, Silver Linings PlaybookZero Dark Thirty and Salmon Fishing in the Yemen. Yes, I said Salmon Fishing in the Yemen.

That’s just one example of surprise nominees that make the Globes such a wild card each and every year. Check out all the winners below along with live commentary.

UPDATE: We’ve embedded a lot of the special moments from the show below.  Read More »

Emma Stone and Seth MacFarlane woke up at the crack of dawn this morning to announce the nominees for the 85th Academy Awards. Academy members nominated nine contenders for Best Picture, with Amour, Argo, Beasts of the Southern Wild, Django Unchained, Les Miserables, Life of Pi, Lincoln, Silver Linings Playbook, and Zero Dark Thirty all in the mix. The choices aren’t totally surprising, but it’s still a strong group of competitors.

It’s always interesting to see how the Best Picture category correlates to the Best Director one, and the notable names shut out this year include Kathryn Bigelow, Ben Affleck, Tom Hooper, and Quentin Tarantino — the first three of whom were all nominated for the DGA prize earlier this week. Another notable snub that I know /Film readers will be all over is the lack of recognition for Looper, which scored in none of the major categories.

On a happier note, The Master hasn’t been getting much love so far but it managed to score three Oscar nominations, all in the acting categories. The Best Actress group proved a historic one, with both the oldest (85-year-old Emmanuelle Riva) and youngest (9-year-old Quvenzhane Wallis) nominees in the category. And the animated field went exactly the way you’d suspect, but I’m just happy to see ParaNorman get a nod. Hit the jump to read the list of nominees.

Read More »

Quentin Tarantino‘s new film Django Unchained is a big beast, but it was once bigger. The original script, widely leaked last summer, is a 166-page monster that features characters and situations that didn’t make the final cut at all, and others that appear in significantly altered form. And then there’s stuff in the film that wasn’t in the script at all, but which was planned to be bigger or more detailed at one point.

If you want to read the script, you can grab it from the Weinstein Company’s “for your consideration” site for the film. Then you can cross reference it with a lot of the info that’s floating around now. For instance, we knew that Sacha Baron Cohen was cast in the film but had to drop out. We’ve got a brief story from him about why he couldn’t play Scotty, a character ultimately cut. And Walton Goggins talks about scenes he shot that didn’t make the final film.

Finally, there’s a secret about the mute character played by Zoe Bell, under a bandanna, which helps reveal why she didn’t have any lines in the film. Vague spoilers follow, but by this point you’ve seen Django, yes? Read More »

Click Here To Read Older Movie News
Cool Posts From Around the Web: