While it was anyone’s guess who’d win the Super Bowl last night, the movie awards ceremonies this weekend were more predictable. Argo continued its steamroll through awards season, picking up a DGA award for Ben Affleck to go with the film’s earlier PGA, SAG, and Globes victories, while PGA winner Wreck-It Ralph took the top prize at the Annies.

Oscar favorites Searching for Sugar Man and Paperman also proved popular on the movie front, as did Jay RoachRian Johnson, and Lena Dunham in the small-screen world. Hit the jump to read the winners.

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Whether you like spiteful Philadelphians or vengeful Romans, there’s something for you here. After the jump:

  • Louis CK, Bryan Cranston, and Rian Johnson score DGA noms
  • It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia is getting its own beer
  • Revolution, Political Animals, and more are coming to Netflix
  • Fox’s late-night animation block will kick off this summer
  • Fox’s In Living Color reboot is not going to happen
  • Read one fan’s argument that it’s OK if NBC kills Community
  • Is ABC’s Happy Endings in danger of getting cancelled?
  • The casting search for Dexter Season 8 offers some plot hints
  • Spartacus: War of the Damned has a bloody new trailer

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And Michel Hazanavicius and his film The Artist take one more step towards total awards dominance. The film has topped critic lists since it premiered at Cannes in May of 2011, and in the past couple weeks has become an awards juggernaut.

Last weekend The Artist won the PGA award for best picture of 2011, and last night Hazanavicius took the Director’s Guild award for Outstanding Achievement in Feature Film in 2011. Given that it has been almost a decade since someone won the DGA award and didn’t take the Best Director Oscar we can safely bet on the outcome of the Academy Awards, which are still a month away. (On average, the DGA award and Oscar go to different people once a decade.)

For those disappointed that the documentary Project Nim, from Man on Wire director James Marsh, didn’t get an Oscar nod, his win for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Documentary might be considered a great consolation. And Patty Jenkins, who was booted from Marvel’s Thor 2, took a DGA award for directing the pilot for The Killing.

The full list of winners is below. Read More »

The Directors Guild of America announced its award winners for achievement in 2010 last night, and the big winner was Tom Hooper, director of The King’s Speech. That, in conjunction with the film’s victory at the Producers Guild awards, puts the movie as the odds-on favorite to win the Best Picture Oscar, and makes Mr. Hooper a likely win for Best Director as well. Read More »

The last big indicator of how the Oscar nominations are likely to shake out is the nomination set for the Director’s Guild of America’s award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement. The DGA and Best Director Oscar awards often line up directly (there have been only six deviations since the DGA awards began in 1948) and before the Best Picture Oscar set was widened to ten films, the DGA nominations were a very good indicator of how that race would go, as well.

Now the 2010 nominations are out, and for the most part they conform to the well-established 2010 awards consensus. See the list below. Read More »

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The last big bellwether for Oscar nominations is the nomination set for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film from the Directors Guild of America. The DGA nominations are the best indicator of what films and directors will be on the shortlist for the Best Director Oscar. Before the Best Picture Oscar field was widened to ten, the DGA noms were also a reasonable indicator of what films would be in contention for Best Picture, too.

The DGA announced the five nominated directors today, and the list generally conforms to expectations created by other recent awards and nominations. Read More »

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