Low Winter Sun

AMC loves complicated, antiheroic protagonists, and they’re adding one more to their slate this summer with Low Winter Sun. Mark Strong and Lennie James star as a pair of Detroit detectives who kill a fellow cop and then try to cover up their misdeed.

Only it’s not that simple, of course. The crime sparks an in-depth investigation, which in turn pushes the pair further and further into moral bankruptcy. Ruben Santiago-Hudson and David Costabile (a.k.a. Gale Boetticher from your other favorite AMC antihero show) also star. Watch the new trailer after the jump.

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Continuing a tradition that started with last year’s surprise unveiling of the then-unfinished Hugo, the New York Film Festival this week revealed a first look at a work-in-progress cut of Steven Spielberg‘s Lincoln.

Though we’ve seen little of the film so far, aside from a couple of trailers, the subject matter and the talent involved have marked it from early on as a potential Oscar contender. Based on the version I saw Monday night, that buzz is well-earned — it’s tough to imagine this film coming out the other end of awards season without at least a couple of little gold men. On the other hand, Spielberg falters by letting the Sixteenth President remain more myth than man, and the resulting film is a polished period piece that only occasionally feels truly vital.

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Teaser trailers, casting, controversy and more are all in this huge edition of TV Bits. After the jump, read about the following:

  • Check out the first promo for the fourth season of the award-winning comedy Modern Family.
  • Entertainment Weekly has four Walking Dead covers this week and the reveal of a brand new character.
  • Chloe Sevigny will appear on IFC’s comedy Portlandia.
  • Try to break out with the latest teaser for American Horror Story: Asylum.
  • Dan Harmon talked about Community controversy and storylines in a Reddit AMA.
  • Outlaw Country, a failed FX pilot about Southern crime, will air as a movie August 24.
  • Casting continues on AMC’s Low Winter Sun.

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It’s “cool projects for former The Shield actors” day! We just heard that Michael Chiklis will be the bad guy in Taylor Hackford’s Parker, and now Walton Goggins has been cast in Steven Spielberg‘s Lincoln. He’s the latest addition to a monster of a cast that begins with Daniel Day Lewis as the sixteenth President of the US and includes many more. We’ll recap the cast after the break. Read More »

Steven Spielberg is a busy man, and while his plans to finally make an Abraham Lincoln biopic were announced late last year, we’ve had little news since. We know that Daniel Day Lewis would play the title role, and that Sally Field will be Mary Todd, but other than that, there has been very little to report. That changes today with the addition of Tommy Lee Jones and Joseph Gordon-Levitt, and a big list of other actors who are all in talks now. More details are after the break. Read More »

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/Film will be recapping and discussing each episode of the third season of Breaking Bad. A spoiler warning applies after the jump for the recaps and for the comments section. Meth heads welcome. For previous recaps, click here.

In movies, when bank robbers and gangsters grumble, “I’m never going back to jail, they’ll have to kill me,” the statement does not uniformly rule out visiting peers who are incarcerated. On the other side of the glass, a visit can be a sobering reminder against surrender, and a satisfying reassurance of dominance to the criminal mind—”Better him than me”—all the while keeping the enemy close. Walter White has never served a prison sentence, but he’s weathered a death sentence as a patient confined to a hospital. The time served there, the loss of freedom and control over his life, forever skewed his outlook on mortality and morality. The hospital is a sort of prison in Walter’s psyche, and in season three, he seems to gain an introspective satisfaction in visiting others there—standing over their beds, his hand—or in the enemy’s case his eyes—on theirs.

Episode seven, and especially episode eight, entitled “I See You” (a play on the acronym for “intensive care unit”) demonstrate how smoothly Walt operates in this setting when he’s not the patient. “I hide in plain site, same as you,” Gus Fring tells him. And in this episode, Walt is never far from a character who is bruised, bloodied, unconscious, emotionally scarred or confused, characters snagged directly or indirectly in the wrath of Walt’s crimes, and thus weaker than him. The hospital scenes in “I See You” are an affirmation for Walt of a reality in which he’s the patriarch of survival, his facade the armor.

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