Nick Nolte Boards Darren Aronofsky’s ‘Noah’

Nick Nolte in Warrior

It’s not surprising that Darren Aronofsky has managed to put together an excellent cast for his Biblical epic Noah. What is surprising is that he’s still adding to it, just two and a half months before the film’s premiere.

The director revealed this morning that he had added Nick Nolte in the role of Samyaza, which was previously associated with recurring Aronofsky player Mark Margolis (a.k.a. Hector Salamanca from Breaking Bad). Hit the jump to see what Aronofsky had to say about the casting.

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Briefly: Darren Aronofsky and New Regency have had a good relationship; the director made The Fountain under an old first-look deal with New Regency, and they worked together to produce Noah, which New Regency financed with Paramount. And while there’s been talk of difficulties with Paramount and Noah, it seems like Aronofsky and New Regency are working together well enough to sign a new deal.

Aronofsky and his Protozoa Pictures signed a new three-year first-look deal with New Regency for feature development, at the same time as Protozoa has signed a similar deal with HBO to develop shows for Aronofsky to direct for television.

“It is a thrill to be re-teaming with my old friends at New Regency,” Aronofsky said. “Arnon [Milchan] has been a great supporter since we made The Fountain together. It is a golden age for the small screen and moving into that realm with HBO as partners is a dream come true. I am excited to see Protozoa’s output explode over the next few years.” [Deadline]

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When Darren Aronofsky’s The Fountain was released in 2006, didn’t perform very well commercially or critically. But in the intervening years, the film has become somewhat of a cult hit, thriving on DVD and online streaming as more people have discovered it and attempted to plumb its depths.

I remember my first experience seeing the film in theaters. I was blown away by the raw performances, the gorgeous space/cell imagery, and the way Aronofsky seamlessly blended these three parallel storylines together. But many things also confused me. In my attempts to figure out what was actually going on, I realized that people actually had multiple interpretations of the film, several of which I just didn’t buy due to the evidence in the movie.

What follows is a video essay that represents my best attempt at explaining the events of the film. Find it after the jump and share your own theories in the comments.
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Noah Ray Winstone

We’re fascinated with Noah, from Darren Aronofsky. The filmmaker has merged the sacred and the profane before, but never on this scale, and rarely for the sort of wide audience that a biblical epic like Noah is likely to draw. And we’re still trying to get a sense of what the film really is — as is Paramount, if reports are any indication. So the trailers so far have been strange, with spatters of character clues and a good hint of spectacle, but I feel like we’re really only seeing a small part of what the film will be.

Below, there’s a new Japanese trailer for Noah, and despite the fact that it is cut for an audience that might not approach the film in the same way a conservative American audience might (and that’s an audience that Paramount very much wants and needs for this movie) it still treads along a path very similar to what’s been used of the domestic sales pitch.

But there’s some new footage here, including a hint or two that the voyage through the flood is particularly rough. Read More »

‘Noah’ International Trailer: The Flood Is Coming

 

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The story of Noah and the ark that preserved some of Earth’s creatures against God’s wrathful flood is one of our most well-known tales, but with Darren Aronofsky doing the telling it’s safe to assume the film Noah will feature some new angles. Russell Crowe plays the devout man given advance word that the flood is coming, and Ray Winstone is the king who — for reasons we don’t entirely know — isn’t thrilled that Noah is building a massive boat in the middle of his kingdom.

Here’s a new international trailer for the film. It may rearrange the money shots from the first trailer, but there a good bit of new footage sprinkled in to hold everything together.  The extra footage of the beginning of the flood is really tremendous; this movie looks like a strange beast, but it will be exciting to see Aronofsky play on such a gigantic scale. Read More »

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Following yesterday’s juicy little teaser, not one but two full-length trailers for Darren Aronofsky‘s Noah have arrived, and you can check out both of them after the jump.

Russell Crowe stars as the familiar Biblical hero, who’s driven by a vision from God to prepare for an upcoming flood that could wipe out all life on Earth. He builds an ark and begins to round up the animals, but not everyone (including villain Ray Winstone) is on board with his plan.

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Noah sunset

Paramount and Darren Aronofsky were still sparring over the third act of Noah, last we heard, but with the Biblical epic scheduled for a spring release it’s about time for the first trailer to land. Which, per the modern movie marketing playbook, means they’re starting off with a trailer for the trailer.

The clip is less than 20 seconds long, but it makes the most of that time. You’ve got Russell Crowe as Noah considering his visions, a few lovely shots of the ark, quick peeks at co-stars Jennifer Connelly and Logan Lerman, and more. Check it out after the jump.

[Update: A new poster has also been revealed -- see it after the jump!]

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Noah Header

Darren Aronofsky‘s upcoming film Noah tells exactly the story the title would lead you to assume: of Noah (Russell Crowe, above), the ark, and the flood, as relayed in the Bible.

Well, not quite as relayed in the Bible, and that’s where things get tricky. From the beginning Aronofsky wasn’t interested in making a straight Biblical story — while he described this one very early on as a “Biblical epic,” the actual details of the story aren’t quite what you got out of Sunday School. The director has said this is “about environmental apocalypse… Noah was the first environmentalist.”

Which could be a problem for Paramount and New Regency, which ponied up for the film not only because Aronofsky’s last movie, Black Swan, turned a healthy profit and earned an Oscar for Natalie Portman, but because everyone on the money side figured a slightly fantastic vision of Noah would be an easy sell to faith-based audiences, simply based on its Biblical pedigree. Oops.

Now there’s word that early test screenings have been “worrisome,” with “troubling reactions,” and talk of Paramount and the director battling over final cut. How much should you make of all that? Figure it out below. Read More »

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