The so-called “battle of the sexes” has been a popular artistic theme since the dawn of time, but only occasionally does that “battle” turn genuinely bloody. Austin Chick‘s SXSW thriller Girls Against Boys is one of those cases.

Danielle Panabaker stars as sweet Shae, who’s dumped by one man and then date-raped by another in short order. In her time of need, she turns to a co-worker (Nicole LaLiberte) whose idea of help involves tracking down and killing the bastard. Before long, the pair are eagerly dispatching all the men who’ve wronged them. Watch the trailer after the jump.

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It’s not often you’ll see Piranha 3DD and Anna Karenina mentioned in the same breath, but every film needs a release date, no matter how trashy or elegant. After the jump, check out new release dates for those two movies, plus Henry Cavill‘s The Cold Light of Day, Robert Pattinson‘s Bel Ami, and the comedy Lola Versus.

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‘Piranha 3DD’ Scream Awards Teaser Trailer

Here’s the first teaser footage from Dimension’s Piranha 3DD, the sequel to Alexandre Aja’s revival of the Piranha series. If this teaser is to be believed, Feast director John Gulager hasn’t changed the formula at all, so this sequel has some sort of story (featuring David Hasselhoff) partially pushed to the background as another group of partying bikini-clad beach babes gets chewed up by hungry prehistoric fish.

We see a glimpse of returning actors Christopher Lloyd and Ving Rhames, the latter of which comes bearing a Robert Rodriguez touch. That, and the whole tone of this teaser, makes Piranha 3DD look like something that might appeal to anyone who enjoyed the low-brow silliness of the last movie. In other words, this is exactly what you expect it to be. Oh, and it is mildly NSFW, as the title suggests. Read More »

Piranha 3DD has one more potential victim: Katrina Bowden, who plays the equally tiny, hot and self-absorbed assistant Cerie on 30 Rock, is now part of the cast. I don’t think I need to run down all the obvious potential perks of this casting for fans of her character on that show. I mean, we don’t need to get all lascivious here. But yes, she’ll be better to look at than David Koechner. The film also features Gary Busey, Danielle Panabaker, Matt Bush, Chris Zylka, Meagan Tandy, Paul James Jordan, Jean-Luc Bilodeau, Hector Jimenez, Adrian Martinez, and Clu Gulager, and is shooting now in North Carolina. Still waiting to hear about the porn starlets that will be cast; Piranha has a reputation to maintain, after all.

After the break, the rather inexplicable remake of Nicolas Winding Refn’s great crime movie Pusher gets a remake cast, and an endorsement from Mr Refn. Read More »

Now this is more like it. The basic cast of Piranha 3DD was announced earlier this week, but aside from the laughter inspired by the film’s title, which is so silly it defies all ridicule, the general response was a shrug. Without some of the better actors from the first film (Richard Dreyfuss, Ving Rhames, Elisabeth Shue, Christopher Lloyd, Adam Scott and even Jerry O’Connell — in other words, the entire top-billed cast) this sequel seems like little more than the reflex action of the sequel-happy Dimension Films. And now that Gary Busey has been added there is no reason to reverse that opinion, but at least some parts of the movie are now more likely to be a lot of fun. Read More »

What more do you need to know about the sequel to Piranha 3D, other than the fact that this one is called Piranha 3DD? Title should tell you everything you need to know. Still, here’s some news from The Weinstein Company: the film is shooting now under the direction of John Gulager (Feast) with a cast that includes Danielle Panabaker (The Crazies), Matt Bush (Adventureland), Chris Zylka (The Amazing Spider-Man), David Koechner (Anchorman), Meagan Tandy (Unstoppable),  Paul James Jordan, Jean-Luc Bilodeau, Hector Jimenez, Adrian Martinez, and Clu Gulager. Read More »

Set Visit: The Crazies

The Crazies

Remakes get a bad rap amongst filmgoers, and understandably so. Instead of attempting to fulfill the potential hinted at in failed or dated movie projects, Hollywood has proven time and time again that the sole purpose of most remakes is to cash in on the success of the near faultless original films. Occasionally though, there’s a glimmer of hope. A quick glance at two of the best horror films the genre has to offer—The Thing and The Fly—clearly demonstrates that technological advances in filmmaking can be used to more effectively convey an older film’s story. While those films were remakes of ’50s cinema, we’ve also seen a vast of array of ’70s remakes—Dawn of the Dead, The Hills Have Eyes, The Last House on the Left—that have proven to be worthy modern takes on dated (albeit classic) material.

The Crazies, due out September 25, is the latest remake to attempt to join the ranks of those films. Based on the cult classic directed and co-written by George Romero, the film tells the story of a small town struck by insanity when an unknown toxin starts turning its happy, law-abiding citizens into mindless killing machines. Trying desperately to survive both the infected populace and the subsequent military response, the town’s Sherrif (Timothy Olyphant), his pregnant wife (Radha Mitchell), his deputy (Joe Anderson), and an assistant at the medical center (Danielle Panabaker) find themselves forced to band together if they ever intend on getting out of the town alive.

Last week I was granted the opportunity to visit the film’s set at Peach County High School in Georgia, where the crew was getting prepped for a lengthy night shoot. Once there, we first spent some time speaking to director Breck Eisner (Sahara), who explained his stance on remaking the film.

Honestly, any time you do a remake or a reimagining, and this is definitely more of a reimagining than a remake, you want to have target aspects of the movie that they didn’t have access to when they first made it. My theory on remaking movies or reimagining movies is that there should be something that they weren’t able to do the first time around. That you can do differently. So it’s not like just redoing Psycho or redoing a perfect movie, it’s redoing something that had limitations. One of big limitations for [George] Romero was obviously budget. I think he had 200 grand or 275 grand to make the entire movie. We’re obviously spending more money than that—it’s not a big budget movie, but we have better assets so we can represent the government as the scale of the force that it needs to be in a movie like this that is oppressive and realistic for us.

We spent the rest of the evening having the end of that comment proven to us, as we ventured next to a massive field on the outskirts of the high school. Read More »

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