Tomorrowland

Hot off the news Disney has moved Star Wars Episode VII from an expected Summer 2015 release date to the winter, the company has slotted another family sci-fi fantasy adventure in the expected Star Wars slot. Tomorrowland, directed by Brad Bird, co-written by Damon Lindelof and starring George Clooney, has been moved from December 2014 to May 22, 2015.

Read More »

.

Please Recommend /Film on Facebook

Lost Logo

A document recently leaked online detailing a version of the hit TV show Lost that never was. It details a show that’s much more episodic, less mythological and almost the exact opposite of the show that ran for six seasons on ABC. Dated May 5, 2004, four months before the first episode aired, some might look at this document and laugh. “Oh look, they really didn’t ever understand what this show is!”

However, we went to the source — show creator Damon Lindelof – who gave us the full details on this document.

This document outlines the version of Lost the network wanted, but one that Lindelof and J.J. Abrams didn’t. In going against this design, we were rewarded with one of the best and most polarizing TV shows of all time. Read More »

leftovers-header

After Lost, writer/producer Damon Lindelof aimed at the big screen, working on scripts for films such as Cowboys & Aliens, Star Trek Into Darkness, Prometheus, World War Z, and Tomorrowland. Now the show he’s been developing for a while, The Leftovers, has been ordered to series at HBO. Ten episodes have been ordered; Peter Berg directed the pilot.

The series follows the after-effects of the Rapture, or more specifically what happens to people who don’t make the cut and are stuck on Earth rather than ascending to the heavens. The crux is that the leftovers, as they could be called, don’t necessarily understand what happened. They only know a bunch of people, including many of their family members and loved ones, disappeared overnight. Read More »

Worlds Fair Small World

The public’s understanding of Brad Bird‘s Tomorrowland has been like its very own theme park ride. First we though it was literally about the Tomorrowland section of Disneyland. Then we heard it had something to do with a 1952 mystery box. Next a more authentic plot description was revealed, and now all of those possibilities are beginning to blend.

Bird is currently in Vancouver, BC shooting the December 2014 release and set photos from the production have begun to leak. Among them, Hugh Laurie as a mysterious doctor and, most intriguing, images of Walt Disney’s “It’s A Small World” ride and costumed characters from Alice in Wonderland and the Three Little Pigs. We explore how that all fits in below. Read More »

Tomorrowland

Tomorrowland, the brainchild of director Brad Bird and screenwriter Damon Lindelof, has been filming in Vancouver, BC for a few weeks now. The pair took a brief detour to the D23 Expo to tease audiences with a mysterious 1952 box and then went back to shooting the holiday 2014 release, leaving fans just as curious about the movie as we were months before hand.

Disney has now officially announced the start of production (they tend to wait a few weeks just to be safe) and while most of what’s in the release is well-known (the cast, the crew, etc.) there’s also the first official plot synopsis of the film. Though merely one sentence, it confirms long-rumored plot descriptions while also pushing focus away from the literal mystery box we saw at the D23 Expo. Read More »

ZZ01F64F92

This weekend at D23 Expo, director Brad Bird and writer Damon Lindelof finally gave the world a glimpse into the mystery box of their new film Tomorrowland. On stage, they literally unboxed the mystery, a 1952 box found inside the basement of the old animation building at Walt Disney Studio. The box and the contents serve as the inspiration for the new film. We wrote about the presentation here, but thats not the end of it. As the presentation came to a close, Bird and Lindelof announced that we’d all be able to get an up close look at the contents of the box at a newly constructed/unveiled booth on the show floor.

We spent two hours waiting to tour the booth with plans to give you guys a virtual look with a photo gallery — but Disney security was out in full force and not allowing ANYONE to take ANY photos. So after the jump, we do have something, information we learned about the contents of the box from the booth, including select transcripts of the audio tour from the booth. We have also included some images from the presentation released by Disney ad closeups of the box’s contents from Bird and Lindelof’s earlier tweeted photos.

Read More »

Judy Greer

Brad Bird‘s Tomorrowland has been the subject of all sorts of rumor and speculation since it was first announced a while back under the title 1952. Heck, for a time, there was even a wild theory going around that it was secretly Star Wars Episode VII. But now the film’s about to take a more concrete shape as production gets under way this week.

And as those cameras prepare to roll, Bird’s rounded up another name for the starry cast. Judy Greer is in negotiations for the mysterious sci-fi pic, which also features George Clooney, Hugh Laurie, Raffey Cassidy, and Britt Robinson. Hit the jump for the latest updates on the project.

Read More »

Damon Lindelof WonderCon

Much ink has been spilled lately about the movie industry’s “bigger is better” problem. Studios regularly throw $200 million or more at the latest Marvel- or DC-based adventure, yet even icons like Steven Spielberg and George Lucas have trouble wrangling mid-range budgets for projects like Lincoln or Red Tails.

Nor does that attitude stop at the financial level. Those hefty price tags come with the expecation of correspondingly massive stories, which is why it seems like every other summer blockbuster hinges on the fate of a major city or even the world itself. And though writer Damon Lindelof acknowledges that he is himself a “purveyor” of these big, explosive moments, even he cops to feeling “slightly turned off by this destruction porn.”

In an illuminating interview, Lindelof offers an inside look at Hollywood’s self-destructive gigantism — how the approach inflates even intimate dramas into superhuman epics, and why it’s so difficult for writers and filmmakers to buck these trends. Hit the jump for more.

Read More »

Click Here To Read Older Movie News
Cool Posts From Around the Web: