Wonder Woman - 2018 PGA Awards Nominees

Awards season is in full swing, and today we have the Producers Guild of America announcing their nominations for the annual PGA Awards. This is one of those awards that is a good indicator of how the Academy Awards nominations are going to fall when the time comes, so a certain comic book movie getting a nomination is kind of a big deal.

The 2018 PGA nominees include the standard awards season favorites like Get Out, The Post, Lady Bird, and Call Me By Your Name. But due to a tie, the full list also features 11 total nominees, which has allowed Wonder Woman to come away with one of the nominations. Find out the rest of the nominees below. Read More »

Batman - Billy Dee Williams - Morning Watch

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, find out how Tim Burton‘s sequel Batman Returns was almost a completely different movie than what ended up in theaters. Plus, watch an hour-long animation roundtable with the directors of Coco, The LEGO Batman Movie and more. And finally, see the plane sequences in Dunkirk get a special Top Gun makeover. Read More »

Ben Pearson’s Top 10 Movies of 2017

Top 10 movies of 2017

As 2017 slowly disappears in our rear-view windows (good riddance!), the /Film staff is looking back on our favorite movies of last year. The year itself was awful in an almost incalculable number of ways, but at least we had a ton of fantastic movies to distract us from the constant barrage against truth and decency. Thankfully, many of last year’s movies were overflowing with those qualities, and I was able to get a steady diet of them amid heart-stopping set pieces, complex characters, and emotionally cathartic cinematic experiences. These were my top 10 movies of 2017.
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The 20 Best Movie Posters of 2017

Best Movie Posters of 2017

We’re close to the end of 2017, and as we rush to catch up on some of the awards season contenders in order to finalize our lists of the Top 10 Movies of 2017 (coming next week), it’s time to take a look back at the year in cinema.

Before we ever see a trailer for a movie, we’ll often see a teaser poster that tries to set the stage for what’s to come on the big screen. A majority of official movie posters from studios are boring, familiar and don’t do much to get people excited. But every year, there are at least a couple dozen movie posters that deserve recognition. So without further adieu, here are the 20 Best Movie Posters of 2017. Read More »

Why Were So Many Major Animated Movies So Bad in 2017?

2017 animated movies

When I sat down to compile a list of the best animated movies of 2017, I realized that the selection was shockingly meager. Outside of Pixar and Disney, animation has never been the pride of Hollywood, often appealing to the lowest common denominator rather than stretching the limits of what animated storytelling can do. That’s a job for the foreign animated flicks or for the arthouse indie films. Mainstream animated films only have to keep kids occupied while their parents run errands.

But there was something exceptionally horrible about 2017’s mainstream animated offerings. Aside from CocoCars 3, and The Lego Batman Movie, Hollywood has had a pretty bad year for animated movies. Don’t remember what came out this year? The Emoji Movie, The Boss Baby, and Smurfs: The Lost Village, just to name a few. Now you see what I mean.

Compared to last year, which boasted fantastic widely released films from high-profile studios like Disney’s Moana and Zootopia and smaller studios like Laika’s Kubo and the Two Strings, this year’s wide-release animated movies have little in the way of critical acclaim. How can there be such a difference in quality in one year? Let’s dive into it.

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Tommy Wiseau disaster artist review

Director Greta Gerwig conducted the set of Lady Bird with the utmost respect for her crew. Cribbing an idea from her 20th Century Women director Mike Mills, she asked everyone to wear name tags during filming so people could get to know each other. She even took it one step further – a PA came up with a conversation-starting question of the day, which everyone then had to answer on their name tag.

Gerwig is not the first person to run a set with this kind of dignity and civility, nor does Lady Bird‘s status as Rotten Tomatoes’ best reviewed film of all time (well, until recently) inherently derive from this production environment. But it does show that there is more than one way to create great art, and it is not necessarily the product of toil and agony from a single tortured artist.

Look at the films from 2017 that centered around artists and their creative process, however, and it’s tough to find anyone who looks or acts remotely like a Gerwig. In a year where the toxicity of a male-dominated film production space became glaringly apparent thanks to the courage of countless brave individuals, the prevalence of this abrasive, abusive archetype in Paul Thomas Anderson’s Phantom Thread, Woody Allen’s Wonder Wheel, James Franco’s The Disaster Artist, Lee Unkrich and Adrian Molina’s Coco, Noah Baumbach’s The Meyerowitz Stories and Darren Aronofsky’s mother! speaks volumes about the mindset of an industry. Most stop short of full-scale lionizing this figure, but the collective fascination borders on fetishization.

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olaf's frozen adventure abc

Looks like Disney doesn’t intend to put Olaf’s Frozen Adventure on ice.

The polarizing Frozen short received a cold reception when it aired in front of screenings of Pixar’s sumptuous new film Coco, with many complaining of the short’s 20-plus minute length and the lack of warning to audiences concerning its placement. Thankfully, two weeks after the short’s run and the frustrated outcry surrounding it, Olaf’s Frozen Adventure was pulled from theaters. But hell would freeze over before Disney lets go of anything related to their animated juggernaut Frozen. Annoyed parents can now be treated to all 21 minutes of the holiday special in the place where it was meant to premiere all along: TV.

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Los Angeles Film Critics Association award winners

Sound the trumpet – awards season is upon us! There is no escape from awards season – you can run but you can’t hide from the glut of critic societies and other organizations announcing movie award winners and nominees as the year comes to a close. Just recently, the Los Angeles Film Critics Association announced their winners for the best films and performances of the year, and the Annie Awards have announced their nominations for the best animated material of 2017. Get the full lists of the Los Angeles Film Critics Association award winners and the Annie Award nominees below.

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Frozen Short Removed from Coco

Many audience members who sat down to see Coco over the past couple weeks were not looking for warm hugs before seeing Pixar’s latest animation feature. But that’s exactly what they got when a 21-minute Frozen short film played before the movie.

Olaf’s Frozen Adventure has stirred up plenty of people since hitting theaters with Coco. Parents, impatient children and critics alike were not happy with the extended running time of the Frozen short film, and even theaters in Mexico were starting to remove the short due to the excessive complaints about it. Well, Disney has been listening, and they will be removing the short from Coco starting next week. Read More »

music of coco

Coco isn’t a musical, but its music is as central to it as the elements of family, memory, life, and death. Music is what carries Miguel (Anthony Gonzalez) along on his quest to find his idol Ernesto de la Cruz (Benjamin Bratt) in the Land of the Dead, music is what unites Miguel and his ragamuffin skeleton companion Hector (Gael Garcia Bernal), and what ultimately tears apart and unites his family.

Music — and the fantastic original songs from the Pixar animated film — is the warm, beating heart of Coco. Because music plays such an essential role, the music team behind Coco made sure to embed the songs and score as deeply into Mexican culture as they could. This amounted to years of research and 5o (!) Mexican musicians participating in the vibrant, effervescent soundtrack.

I spoke to composer Michael Giacchino, who has had a busy year composing scores for a whopping three blockbusters (Spider-Man: Homecoming, War for the Planet of the Apes); orchestrator Germaine Franco, who participated in the movie’s pivotal song “Remember Me”; and cultural consultant Camilo Lara, who brought to the film a connection to the plethora of Mexican music genres as well as a signature Dr. Seuss-style hat.

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