Writer-director Duncan Jones‘ new movie, Mute, has been a long time coming. “I’ve finally got this boulder up the hill,” he told us with a laugh and a sense of relief. The filmmaker behind MoonSource Code, and Warcraft originally envisioned his bleak, surprisingly old-school sci-fi mystery as his directorial debut, but the project faced its share of challenges over the years.

When you see the movie, it’s easy to understand why. Mute certainly isn’t a middle-of-the-road film or a story that plays it safe. The movie is a real nasty piece of work at times, but it’s also not without a sense of perverse fun and beauty. After sixteen years of Jones trying to get Mute made, the end result is a packed-to-the-brim science fiction noir that feels like it’s been waiting to be unleashed for a long time.

We recently spoke with Jones about the project’s history, his affinity for Blade Runner, twisting Paul Rudd’s nice guy image, and more.

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Mute review

Duncan Jones‘ passion project, the sci-fi film Mute, has finally arrived on Netflix – but was it worth the wait?

Our Mute review answers that question below.

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ghost in the shell clip

At the very least, perhaps we can expect the upcoming Ghost in the Shell to be mostly pleasing to the eyes and ears. Director Rupert Sanders has exhibited a sharp eye in his commercial work and even his underwhelming directorial debut, Snow White and the Huntsman, looked great. Accompanying Sanders’ high-tech futuristic eye candy is a score from none other than Clint Mansell (Moon). Their work hand-in-hand could be quite an experience on the big screen. Whether the movie is as good as some of the talent involved, including the film’s star, Scarlett Johansson, we’ll know next week.

In the meantime, we can watch this new Ghost in the Shell clip, which showcases an action scene from the film.

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GHOST IN THE SHELL Clint Mansell

Ghost in the Shell has no shortage of stunning visuals, which is no surprise considering it’s directed by Rupert Sanders. (Say what you will about Snow White and the Huntsman — and I’m personally of the opinion that it is not a very good movie — but it at least looks really pretty.) And now it sounds like we can expect some fine music to go along with it. Clint Mansell, the composer behind Requiem for a DreamBlack SwanMoonStoker, and many more great-sounding films, has been confirmed to score Ghost in the Shell.

Of course, none of this will do much to address the ongoing controversy over the decision to cast a white actress (Scarlett Johansson) to lead an adaptation of an iconically Japanese property. But producer Avi Arad sounds like he’s not too concerned about those accusations of whitewashing anyway. According to him, everyone he’s talked to thinks the casting choice is “great.”  Read More »

Director Duncan Jones Starts Shooting ‘Mute’ Next Week

mute filming

Mute has been a longtime passion project for Duncan Jones. The director wanted to make the Berlin-set sci-fi film, which he co-wrote with Michael Robert Johnson, his directorial debut, but it got put on hold for Moon. Still struggling to get Mute financed, Jones then made Source Code his sophomore effort. Then he went on to direct Warcraft. But before his video game adaptation opened in theaters, it was announced Alexander Skarsgård and Paul Rudd would star in Mute. The two actors will enter Berlin circa 2046 soon because Duncan Jones’ film finally begins shooting next week.

Below, learn more about Mute.

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Cool Posts From Around the Web:

mute composer

I’ve gone on the record about not being a particularly big fan of Warcraft, but that doesn’t change the fact that I still believe in Duncan Jones. After all, how could you possibly write off the man who made Moon and Source Code? And for its many faults, Warcraft is still a work of passion that is too weird to be dismissed completely.

So I’m choosing to look to the future and toward Mute, the science fiction noir Jones has been teasing since 2009, when it was supposed to be his sophomore feature. Although this project isn’t an a direct sequel to Moon, it is apparently set in the same near-future world. So of course Jones would re-team with composer Clint Mansell, who wrote the score for Moon.

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High-Rise images

There’s no trailer for Ben Wheatley‘s High-Rise, seemingly in part because there’s isn’t a firm release plan announced in the UK, and no US distributor. We’re waiting eagerly for news of the film’s theatrical release. In the meantime, however, we’ve got two new High-Rise images showing Jeremy Irons, Tom Hiddleston, and Elisabeth Moss as they appear in the film.

And while images of Hiddleston’s character that we’ve seen in the past (like the one above) made the guy look like his life is pretty together, this new shot shows him in a different place. And then there’s a shot of Irons which is a bit mysterious, even ominous. Read More »

Clint Mansell Scoring ‘High-Rise’

High-Rise score

Everything we’ve heard about High-Rise, the new film from Ben Wheatley, which adapts the novel by J.G. Ballard, has me dying to see this one. Tom Hiddleston and Luke Evans (above, as seen in the film) lead the cast in a story about class warfare in a high-rise apartment block. From what we’ve heard from people who saw sales footage in Berlin, this one might be totally insane. Now the film has a very promising musical component, as Clint Mansell has been announced as the creator of the High-Rise score. Read More »

Clint Mansell's Noah Score

We’ve got two great scores for you to check out in full this week. One is a score you’ve probably been excited to hear: Clint Mansell‘s Noah score, marking one more collaboration between the composer and director Darren Aronofsky. The other is Mica Levi‘s great and at times unearthly score for Under the Skin, the Jonathan Glazer film starring Scarlett Johansson. They’re very different pieces, with Mansell’s score going appropriately big at times, but also more complimentary in the end than you might expect. Read More »

Noah review

I’ve been a fan of director Darren Aronofsky since I first saw Pi. His film Requiem for a Dream remains one of my favorite movies of all time. Aronofsky has yet to make a movie I have dislike; his last few films were all in my top ten films of those respective years. Over the last decade, Aronofsky has become attached to a bunch of big budget projects including the films that later became Batman Begins, Watchmen, The Wolverine and Robocop. I’ve been itching to see what Aronofsky could accomplish with a larger budget. Noah is that film. Read my Noah review after the jump.

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