Comic Con: The Goon Panel Impressions and Footage

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Last year’s panel for The Goon, Eric Powell‘s odd comic book series about two friends who (to grossly over-simplify) live in a city infested by a plague of zombies, was unbridled insanity. This year’s panel was a lot more restrained, despite the presence of returning moderator Ben Garant.

This year it was all about the movie that is in development based on The Goon, so things were a little more restrained. Producer David Fincher was in the house, and while the panel wasn’t all business (by a long shot) it definitely focused more on what the movie might be and how it could get made than anything else. Read More »

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Teaser Trailer: The Goon

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…aaand we’re back with more (sorta) David Fincher news. But if you’re one of the many people irritated at the whole idea of Fincher remaking The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, you might be able to get behind this one. Here’s some of the first footage for The Goon, the CGI animated adaptation of Eric Powell‘s comic book series. You won’t see Fincher’s involvement (he’s producing) but you will hear Paul Giamatti as the voice of Frankie. (That’s the skinny chap in the a-shirt.) This is a preview of the stuff that will be shown at Comic Con in a few days, but for now it’s the only up to date Goon animation online. Read More »

A Nightmare On Elm Street

There’s a joke at the center of A Nightmare on Elm Street, a very simple one, that would be hilarious if it wasn’t so damning. The joke is that a film about kids desperately trying to stay awake is so incredibly good at putting me to sleep.

A hybrid re-imagining and remake of Wes Craven‘s 1984 original, this Nightmare feels like it has been glued together out of ill-fitting parts. A shot for shot sequence remake here, characters mixed and matched there, and a Freddy Krueger that is far more vile than the original, yet significantly less interesting to watch. You’d think those two aspects might correspond. A more realistic, disgusting Krueger should be less overtly entertaining than Robert Englund’s version, which worked one-liners for over a decade. That’s part of it, but the one-liners aren’t actually gone, while the grim approach isn’t more frightening.

In the hands of director Samuel Bayer, multiple screenwriters and Michael Bay‘s Platinum Dunes, this is a would-be serious horror film with nothing to say, and no imagination to fall back on. Read More »

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