John Carpenter album

Not only is John Carpenter an acclaimed filmmaker behind some of the best horror movies ever made – HalloweenThe ThingThey Live – he’s also the creator of some of the best horror movie music. Just as E.T. wouldn’t be nearly as effective without John Williams’ orchestral score, Halloween would be a lesser film without Carpenter’s eerie yet simple themes, made up of repeating piano melodies that alternate between sporadic and heart-attack fast. Horror movie music wouldn’t be the same without Carpenter’s contributions, which are just as exciting and influential as his films. While other horror soundtrack composers tend to encroach on an audience with loud, stunning musical cues, Carpenter’s scores hang back; waiting, biding their time, and building dread.

Carpenter is releasing a new album, Anthology: Movie Themes 1974-1998, a collection of 13 of his movie themes re-recorded with his touring band. And it’s pretty great. So join us: we’re going through the new John Carpenter album track by track.

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John Carpenter's Christine - The Morning Watch

(The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.)

In this edition, John Carpenter has directed a new music video for a track off the director and composer’s new album Anthology: Movie Themes 1974-1998. Plus, a new episode of Futurama debuted this week, though not in the form you’d think. And The Late Late Show with James Corden had some fun with Stephen King’s It. Read More »

Gallery 1988 Stephen King Art Show

This year brings not one but two adaptations of Stephen King properties. We’ll get The Dark Tower in August and then a new take on the horror classic It in September. Both titles are featured several times in Gallery 1988’s new art show inspired by the various works by Stephen King. Other celebrated titles include but are not limited to Christine, Stand By Me, The Green Mile, Cujo, Misery, The Mist and more.

Check out pieces from the Gallery 1988 Stephen King art show after the jump. Read More »

David Chen’s Top 10 Films of 2016

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This is a year where you had to work to see great films. Unlike last year, the vast majority of my favorite movies of 2016 weren’t movies that received wide releases, nor were they films that earned over $50 million at the box office. Instead, they were often quieter releases that I had to read up on in order to make sure I caught them during the 1-2 weeks they were playing in my city.

The good news is, if you did the work, you were richly rewarded. While the movie industry as a whole is not doing so hot, movies as a form of storytelling still feel as vital as ever. What follows are my top 10 movies of 2016.  Read More »

christine-trailer

Afterschool director Antonio Campos follows up his unnervingly hypnotic film Simon Killer with Christine. Campo’s third feature premiered at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year, where it was praised as a brutal, intimate character study with a tremendous performance from Rebecca Hall (The Gift) as Christine Chubbuck, a reporter who committed suicide on the air in 1974. The independent drama, which co-stars Michael C. Hall (Cold in July) and Tracy Letts (Indignation), was sold to The Orchard, and they’re releasing it into theaters next month.

Below, watch the Christine trailer.

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john carpenter movies ranked

For the past month, I’ve been revisiting the filmography of John Carpenter, a filmmaker of extraordinary range and skill who spent a few decades churning out one masterpiece after another. And then, as luck would have it, Carpenter (who has all but retired) started entering the news again. First, Guillermo del Toro paid tribute to him with a brilliant string of tweets. Then, Blumhouse acquired the rights to make a new Halloween movie and brought Carpenter on board as an executive producer. My personal project was suddenly relevant!

Then again, John Carpenter is always relevant as long as you want to talk about one of the most fascinating and entertaining filmmakers of the past forty years. Because I needed an excuse to write about his movies (and because this is the internet), I ranked all 18 of Carpenter’s theatrically released films, which was actually a tricky progress. Even his weaker movies tend to be interesting and his best movies are so good that they defy comparison.

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2016 Sundance most anticipated

January doesn’t tend to be a great month for movies if you’re surveying the options at your local multiplex, but it’s one of the best times of the year for film lovers lucky enough to attend the Sundance Film Festival. This year, three of us — Peter Sciretta, Ethan Anderton, and myself — will be on the scene for /Film, taking in some of the best of this year’s independent cinema. Highlights from last year included Me and Earl and the Dying GirlDopeThe End of the TourSlow WestThe Witch, and Cop Car. So what will this year’s slate hold? Join us after the jump for a preview of 30 films we can’t wait to see at the 2016 Sundance film festival.  Read More »

sundance 2016 line-up

Yes, its that time of year again. The Sundance Institute has revealed the 65 feature films which will make up the U.S. & World Cinema Competition as well as the out-of-competition NEXT slate of the 2016 Sundance Film Festival. Hit the jump to see the Sundance 2016 line-up and get excited about next year’s independent films today!

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elvis2

Weekend Weirdness’ favorite J.C. directed a nearly three hour epic about The King starring his main man Snake Plissken, and yet the film was at risk of being forgotten by younger generations. How could this occur when the movie in question, John Carpenter‘s Elvis, is arguably a better country music biopic than Walk the Line, and exudes an unpretentious but fetching style reminiscent of Hal Ashby’s Woody Guthrie biopic Bound for Glory? Well, until this week, Elvis wasn’t available on DVD, and the film’s prior home video presence was spotty at best.

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Cool Posts From Around the Web:

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With one of the choicest “stranded on an island with entertainment center” filmographies, genre or otherwise, director John Carpenter is without a doubt a fave here at Slashfilm. Next month, the man himself will be on hand for two out of four nights to wax awesome on his various ’80s era classics at a film festival presented by non-profit American Cinematheque (nice effort!) and Santa Monica’s Aero Theater. Unfortunately, They Live (probably my fave of his) is not being shown, but one really can’t moan the slightest about such a rare opportunity. Here’s the schedule…

Friday, June 13th, 7:30 p.m.
The Thing
and The Fog
Carpenter will discuss films between showings

Saturday, June 14th, 7:30 p.m.
Escape From New York and Escape From L.A.
Carpenter will discuss films between showings

Sunday, June 15th, 7:30 p.m.
Halloween and Christine (no speaker, but how sick is this double feature!?)

Wednesday, June 18th, 7:30 pm.
Big Trouble in Little China and Assault on Precinct 13
AOP13‘s Austin Stoker will discuss between films

Hopefully, everyone reading this site has seen these films. If not, make like Chainsaw and Dave this summer and join the club. If you’ll be attending one or more of these screenings with Carpenter shoot us an email after with a report. For more info, go here.