When you’re too lazy to go to the movies and all your DVDs look boring, what’s the next step? Most likely the TV and, without further ado, here’s a bunch of TV news that’s broken over the past few days:

  • Fox is rebooting their hit 1990s sketch comedy show In Living Color.
  • FX’s hit series American Horror Story has just been renewed for a second season.
  • NBC recently purchased a show written by and starring comedian Jim Gaffigan.
  • Charlie Sheen will return to TV next summer with his new show Anger Management.
  • Bridesmaids star Chris O’Dowd has a new show called Big Men picked up by NBC.
  • Fox has ordered up more episodes of the animated comedy Bob’s Burgers.
  • Awake, starring Jason Isaacs, has shut down production to overhaul the remaining scripts.

Read more about all of this after the break. Read More »

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It’s been a decade since Roman Coppola directed a feature film (CQ, released in 2001) but he is preparing his second movie as director, A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III. The movie is at least partially inspired by the public meltdown of Charlie Sheen, and Sheen will play the title character. Aubrey Plaza, Jason Schwartzman and Katheryn Winnick have been cast over the past few weeks, and now Bill Murray, Mary Elizabeth Winstead and Patricia Arquette are signing on, too. Read More »

Ken Jeong has built up a respectable career as a supporting actor, most notably on NBC’s Community and the Hangover films, but for his next movie role he’ll be moving a little closer to the spotlight. Jeong is set to star in and produce The Chung Factor, which landed on the 2005 Black List back when it was titled The Ex-Factor. Andy Selsor‘s screenplay revolves around a nice guy who falls in love with a woman, but begins to worry he’ll screw things up and employs an “offbeat” relationship coach (Jeong). Unfortunately, said coach turns out to be the woman’s ex, who wants to win her back and is actively trying to ruin the nice guy’s chances.

It’s great to see the talented and funny Jeong nabbing some bigger parts, but I kind of wish he’d chosen to play the romantic lead. The villain here sounds like he fits a little too comfortably into Jeong’s repertoire of mean weirdos — it would’ve been nice to see him stretch a bit more. [The Wrap]

After the jump, Daenerys Targaryen considers joining Éomer and Prince Caspian as they steal cars in France, while Katheryn Winnick nabs a starring role opposite America’s Trainwreck Charlie Sheen.

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Julia Stiles is set to co-star in David O. Russell‘s The Silver Linings Playbook, based on Matthew Quick‘s novel. The story centers around a former high school teacher (Bradley Cooper) who’s just been released from a four-year stint at a mental hospital into the care of his mother (Jacki Weaver). Upon his release, he tries to win back his ex-wife but eventually falls into a romance with an troubled young widow (Jennifer Lawrence). Stiles has landed the role of Lawrence’s older sister.

But perhaps the more exciting bit of news is that Chris Tucker, who entered talks last month to play Cooper’s friend from the institution, is now in final negotiations to take the role. I got a little worried last week, when stories of Weaver’s casting didn’t mention Tucker’s name, but I’m happy to see I was overreacting. If Tucker finalizes the deal, Silver Linings Playbook will be his first film part since 2007′s Rush Hour 3. [Deadline]

After the jump, April Ludgate watches Charlie Harper lose his mind, and Paul Walker deals with the aftermath of Katrina.

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Classic sayings have that status for a reason. Take ‘be careful what you wish for.’ Just a few days ago we found that Roman Coppola‘s new film, the existence of which was teased by his sister Sofia Coppola many months ago, is a picture called A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charlie Swan III. (Or A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III — there’s a bit of confusion on the Charles/Charlie aspect.)

No info outside the title was available, and naturally we wanted to know more. Now we do: Charlie Swan will be played by Charlie Sheen, in his first major film role since the very public meltdown that turned his life into a meme. So how about it, Coppola fans and Sheen detractors? Does this info change things for you? I know I’m wrestling with it. Read More »

There has been a lot of fallout from Charlie Sheen‘s string of recent interviews and outbursts. His show, Two and a Half Men, is shut down for the season. His kids have been taken away. And he is a media darling, but only because by all appearances he is completely crazy, and crazy sells.

But if rumor is to be believed, even in part, the media furor around Charlie Sheen is making him a hot commodity for producers that aren’t Two and a Half Men‘s Chuck Lorre. We don’t know what gigs, if any, he’ll get as a result of the public awareness bump from the last few weeks, especially since such public interest has a notoriously short half-life.

But one possible job offer reportedly comes from the boys behind The Hangover Part II. Read More »

When the comedy Major League was released in 1989, little did we know how perfectly Charlie Sheen would personify the Wild Thing moniker he portrayed in film. He was crazy at the time, but in recent years Sheen has been better known for coke, hookers, million dollar paychecks and Jon Crier than making movies. Still, the Wild Thing has been our reality for years and, in an interview with TMZ, Sheen said he’s doing “everything in his power” to once again make our heart sing on the big screen. If the powers that be greenlight a script, Sheen wants to make another Major League movie. Read more details after the break. Read More »

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It’s a crazy, mixed up world and we are thankful for movies, excluding Valentine’s Day starring every safe, boring white actor ever, that offer proof. Slashfilm’s Weekend Weirdness examines such flicks, whether in the form of a new trailer for a provocative indie, a mini review or an interview.

In 1986, a supernatural moto-fantasy about a murdered bro who returns via a phantasmic, black stealth race car to kill his killers was released on Earth and no one gave a shit. More than two decades later, The Wraith, though forever without a wet ‘stache lick from Peter Travers, is cult-minted for being memorable-enough ’80s-ploitation. Next month sees the release of a Special Edition DVD that adequately recognizes and explores the movie’s legacy and history with commentary courtesy director Mike Marvin and featurettes on the film’s semi-iconic Dodge racer and co-star Clint Howard (who, if not semi-iconic himself, sported a semi-iconic wig inspired by Eraserhead for the film).

Revisiting The Wraith, what’s interesting is how this derivative hybrid of genres and classic revenge films—Marvin references High Plains Drifter and The Road Warrior—remains sublimely adolescent but in an inherently cold and detached way. Stranger still is how this suits the film’s undead hero, vehicle, and hints of an afterlife with a decidedly mechanical bent. And before viewing the S.E. I had no idea a crew member died and many others were injured in a chase scene gone awry. One stunt coordinator recounts how a grip fell 60-feet down a rocky embankment and was only found knocked-out but okay hours later. Nor did I know (or need to) that a sunbathing scene with lead star Charlie Sheen as the titular, ghostly hero and co-star Sherilyn Fenn (Twin Peaks, Wild at Heart) was shot on a “near-freezing” day. Hearing these stories, I wonder now if the troubles of the production didn’t contribute to the overall tone. And looking back at the film itself, which was released the same year as Top GunFerris Bueller, and Blue Velvet, might The Wraith, however unintentionally, deserve to be called Lynchian?

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