Whatever the box office numbers indicate, I’m inclined to believe there are plenty of original ideas left in Hollywood… but you won’t find them here, because this post is all about the remakes. After the jump:

  • More Robocop pics; Aimee Garcia joins cast
  • Get first looks at Carrie and Evil Dead at NYCC
  • Allen Hughes is remaking A Bittersweet Life
  • Game of Thrones director will remake Jar City
  • Brett Ratner is producing Disney’s Flamingo Kid

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Spike Lee is turning to some familiar faces to help round out the cast of his Oldboy remake. After adding his Do the Right Thing star Samuel L. Jackson a few weeks back, Lee is turning to his Red Hook Summer actor Nate Parker for another supporting role. The up-and-comer’s other credits include ArbitrageRed Tails and The Secret Life of Bees.

A remake of Chan-wook Park‘s hit South Korean thriller, Oldboy centers around a man (Josh Brolin) out to exact revenge on the person who kidnapped and imprisoned him for mysterious reasons. Sharlto Copley plays the villain, while Elizabeth Olsen co-stars as a woman who aids and romances Brolin’s character. Parker is in talks to play a doctor colleague of Olsen’s. Oldboy will shoot this fall, likely for a 2013 release. [Variety]

After the jump, Carrie and The Evil Dead get synopses, and José Padilha responds to talk of Robocop difficulties.

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NO PHOTOS

As summer draws to a close we’re in a slow couple of news weeks. Things will pick up soon as the fall festival circuit begins in earnest, and with it the casting and sales deals that put in motion the films we’ll (hopefully) be seeing a year or so from now.

In the meantime, take a look at some set photos of films that are in progress right now. The best shots are of Leonardo DiCaprio and Martin Scorsese shooting The Wolf of Wall Street. (Lawsuit be damned.) That’s a taste, above. More Wolf pics are below, along with some set photos from Kimberly Peirce‘s Carrie — see some of the prom set — and Thor: The Dark World, which is just about to get rolling. Read More »

Part of the narrative surrounding the creation of Kimberly Peirce‘s new adaptation of Stephen King‘s debut novel Carrie is that the film will hew closer to the novel than did Brian De Palma’s classic version, and therefore differ substantially from it. That may end up being true, and yet the first two official photos from the film highlight the similarities between Peirce’s new version and De Palma’s original.

Which is to say, here we’ve got one photo showing Carrie (Chloë Grace Moretz), after being doused in pig blood at the climax of her first prom experience, which is also the beginning of the story’s violent explosion of repressed young sexuality and frustration. The other shows Julianne Moore as Carrie’s rigidly religious mother, who acts as the girl’s primary repressor. See both images in full below. Read More »

Given that Brian De Palma’s 1976 Carrie is revered as a classic of horror cinema, it’s tough to avoid thinking of Kimberly Peirce‘s new version of Carrie as a remake. But strictly speaking, it’s not a rehash of De Palma’s version but rather a fresh interpretation of Stephen King‘s original 1974 novel. And Peirce and screenwriter Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa seem to be working hard to make the story their own.

The new Carrie will be set in the modern day rather than in the ’70s, and star Chloë Moretz has previously described it as “a more Black Swan version” of the story. So how will that translate onscreen, exactly? Check out the first pic of Moretz in costume and the new official synopsis after the jump.

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With a few exceptions, the idea of remaking a classic horror film has proven to be one that faces many pitfalls. And when the original in question is Brian De Palma’s version of the Stephen King story Carrie, a film crafted with impressive style and quite a lot of moxie, there might be more pitfalls than usual. De Palma’s favored split-screen technique has been put to work telling many stories over the years, but the use of the device in Carrie is particularly good. The film is one of the director’s best, and one of the best adaptations of King’s work. It’s a tough act to follow.

But Boys Don’t Cry director Kimberly Peirce is an interesting choice to tackle a new version of Carrie, and she’s got a good start with the cast, as Chloe Moretz is the titular young girl whose telekenetic powers and emerging puberty put her at odds with her fundamentalist mom, played by Julianne Moore.

Portia Doubleday (Youth in Revolt) and Judy Greer (Arrested Development) were also added to the lineup today. More info on their roles, as well as Moretz’s comments about the Black Swan-like tone of this version, are below. Read More »

With Carrie‘s June 1 start date just around the corner, director Kimberly Peirce is adding the final touches to her cast. Leads Chloë Grace Moretz and Julianne Moore have been locked in since this spring, but it’s only in the past couple of weeks that the production has been staffing up on supporting players.

Chronicle star Alex Russell and theater actor Ansel Elgort signed on earlier this month, and now we’re hearing that Judy Greer, Ivana Baquero (Pan’s Labyrinth), and Gabriella Wilde (The Three Musketeers) are circling three key supporting roles. More details after the jump.

Update: Sources say this casting info isn’t yet set, so we’ll report further as official word is released.

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Typically, it’s the French New Wave that gets all the news, but Japan had its own New Wave in the ’60s, and one of the key players, whether he would have said as much or not, was Suzuki Seijun. The director worked for Nikkatsu studios, and in the ’60s he started to crank out studio films that grew weirder with each release. One of the formative films in that period was Youth of the Beast, starring the chipmunk-cheeked Shishido Joe.

Though not as wild as some of Suzuki’s later films, Youth of the Beast is a great, weird film. And now it will be remade by John Woo, who will call his version Day of the Beast. Rob Frisbee scripted, and Woo’s long-time producer Terence Chang will produce. Ironically, while Nikkatsu eventually fired Suzuki for his increasingly eccentric films, this production is part of the studio’s 100th Anniversary.

After the break, there’s a trailer for the original Youth of the Beast, and we’ve got some news on the new version of Carrie, and one of the prime movers behind the original Little Shop of Horrors speaks about the new film version of that story. Read More »

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