Earlier this year, we posted a trailer for Guy Moshe‘s Bunraku, only to be asked by the producers to take it down when it turned out that the video we’d shown was not the official trailer. We promised then that we’d re-post when the producer-approved version surfaced, and now here it is.

The super-stylized samurai/Western/noir flick stars Josh Hartnett, Woody Harrelson, and Japanese musician/actor Gackt star as a drifter, a bartender, and a samurai, respectively, who join forces to take down a powerful crime boss (Ron Perlman). Demi Moore and Kevin McKidd also appear. Watch the 100% official trailer after the jump.

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‘Bunraku’ Trailer

UDPATE: Because this isn’t an official trailer, the producers of the film have been trying to get it removed from YouTube. At their request, we’ve pulled it and will re-post something when an official version is available.

Bunraku looks like one hell of a weird beast. The film stars Josh Hartnett, Woody Harrelson, Demi Moore, Gackt, Ron Perlman, Kevin McKidd and more in something that looks like the love child of Takashi Miike and Frank Miller, if the two hooked up while watching the films of Seijun Suzuki. The trailer has finally landed, and there’s a 50/50 chance you’ll walk away from it a lot more confused or uncertain about the film than you might be already. Watch it after the break. Read More »

I started out my 30-day film festival trip with some awesome movie selections — Over the last week, I’ve screened some of the best movies of the year. Sooner or later I expected to come across some average to subpar films. It was bound to happen. That time is now.

At film festivals, I try not to focus much on the negative. I like to cultivate the films I loved or liked and share them with you. There is almost no point in tearing apart a film that you’ve never heard of and will never see in your local multiplex. However, the Toronto International Film Festival is a lot different than Telluride. The main focus of the TIFF line-up is comprised of films with actors you recognize or from big name directors. Sure, there are a selection of independent films here too (a lot of Canadian indie films as well), but the main focus is on the star studded premieres. That’s just the kind of festival it is.

In the last day and a half I’ve seen a bunch of these type of films. Some of them I liked (but didn’t really love, while others I definitely wouldn’t recommend. That is this blog post.
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TIFF Movie Review: Clint Eastwood’s Hereafter

Clint Eastwood‘s new film Hereafter is one of the most talked about films going into this year’s festival. When the schedule for the festival was announced, it featured one sole performance, and no press screenings.

Industry bloggers threw a fuss and Warner Bros responded that they planned to have a press screening sometime on the first Saturday of the festival. And they followed through with that promise. TIFF Press received an e-mail less than two hours before the newly announced screening. Most critics learned about the screening after it was too late. And what kind of screening room did they find to screen this highly anticipated movie? One that fit less than 140 people. To give you perspective, the biggest press screening room fits 557 people (I know this because we just saw Dustin Lance Black’s directorial debut on that screen).

Why would Warner Bros be so elusive about a press screening? Why screen the film only once publicly? Could it possibly be THAT bad? Might they be trying to prevent bad buzz from spreading fast? And if so, why submit the film to a film festival in the first place?

Update: I have talked to someone involved who says the press screening was scheduled weeks in advance. But the information was not available on any of the press schedule board updates. So I’m not sure why the majority of press were only alerted of it an hour and forty five minutes before the screening.

I can’t answer any of the questions above, but I can tell you what I thought of the film.

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127-hours-5

Last night we got a brief preview of some of the films that will appear in the always-entertaining Midnight Madness lineup at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival. Now we’ve got the full nine, which in addition to the three announced last night (Super, Bunraku and The Butcher, The Chef and the Swordsman) include John Carpenter‘s The Ward, Brad Anderson‘s Vanishing on 7th Street and Insidious, by James Wan.

But TIFF isn’t stopping there: a whole host of other high-profile films were announced for the fest today. They include Clint Eastwood‘s Hereafter, Casey Affleck‘s I’m Still Here, Matt ReevesLet Me In, Dustin Lance Black‘s directorial debut What’s Wrong With Virginia? and the Will Ferrell dramedy Everything Must Go, along with confirmation of Danny Boyle‘s 127 Hours, for which there’s a new photo. (Above.) This year’s TIFF looks like a good one: check info about all the films after the break. Read More »

So many of my favorite movie experiences are the result of seeing films during the Midnight Madness program at the Toronto International Film Festival. The program perches like a beast ready to devour the more ‘respectable’ films at TIFF. While seeing films at the fest is great, period, there’s nothing quite like catching the world premiere of a psychopathic genre film with a crowd of hundreds of eager fans of left of center cinema. Every August I’m always eager to see the new lineup, because it’s basically guaranteed to have at least one or two films I’ll be recommending to friends for the next year.

Tonight, Midnight Madness programmer Colin Geddes revealed three of this year’s Midnight Madness films via Twitter, and one is a film most of us here at /Film are eager to see: the world premiere of James Gunn‘s Super. Read More »

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