Al Pacino

Brian De Palma is responsible for two of Al Pacino‘s many iconic roles: the leads in Scarface and Carlito’s Way. Now, after a long break from one another, the two are reportedly shopping a new movie at the American Film Market called Retribution. It’s a remake of the 2003 Belgian film, The Memory Of A Killer, which is about a hitman with Alzheimer’s who is on the trail of a child prostitution ring. Read more about Brian De Palma and Al Pacino’s Retribution below. Read More »

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Brian De Palma returns with Passion, starring Rachel McAdams and Noomi Rapace as a successful exec and a new junior player, who become embroiled in sex and violence as corporate power games lead to intense personal manipulation.

In reality, Passion has been kicking around for a while, as it started doing festival rounds last year. Response has been middling, with many reviews painting it as a thing likely to be best appreciated by devoted fans of the director. Speaking as one of those people, I’m still very curious to see how Passion plays out. While we’ve featured a couple trailers for the film in the past, here’s a US-specific cut meant to promote the film’s August opening.  Read More »

Twenty years after Carlito’s Way and thirty years after Scarface, Brian De Palma and Al Pacino are reuniting to tell the tale of a very complicated man. The pair have just signed on for Happy Valley, a drama about late, disgraced Penn State coach Joe Paterno. Dave McKenna (American History X) is nearing a deal to write a script based on the bestselling biography Paterno, by Joe Posnanski. Hit the jump for more details.

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After an uneven decade that included Redacted and The Black Dahlia, Brian De Palma is heading into the 2010s with this fall’s Passion. A remake of Alain Corneau’s Crime d’amour, the erotic thriller centers around a ruthless corporate executive named Christine (Rachel McAdams) and her bright but timid assistant Isabel (Noomi Rapace). Christine delights in manipulating her innocent protege, but when she goes a step too far, Isabel begins plotting her revenge. Watch the trailer after the jump.

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Draw a Venn diagram of film that has both mass appeal and is of interest to movie website editors and, dead center, you’ll have Prometheus.

Never in my sixty-eight years of writing professionally online have I banged out so much copy about one title. There is absolutely nothing left to scrutinize – that is, until, the general public sees it and starts floating their own interpretations. This gives us a window (here in the US, anyway) of about one day.

As such, I figured this week’s TBMYPHS should be about the one thing Prometheus-related that hasn’t been overly analyzed – its title. (Prometheus, Greek titan, tied to a rock, hit Wikipedia for more.)

So light yourself a plate of saganaki, it’s time to explore our Greek titular heritage. Read More »

I like the fact that the band is still called Sonic Youth, even though they’re all in their 50s. Similarly, there’s the term New Hollywood, which represents a very specific time in which the studio bosses gave free reign to independent-minded, radical filmmakers looking to push the artistic boundaries of film. It is a cinema movement that came out guns blazing in 1967 with Bonnie and Clyde and suffered its first wound from Jaws in 1975, then sank into the mud under its own weight by 1977 with Sorcerer. (Yeah, that’s right, Roy Scheider represents the end of New Hollywood from both directions.)

But these movies still feel “new.”

These were films made by a generation influenced by European Art Cinema, reacting against big studio bloat and, in many cases, taking advantage of new technical advances. There are a hundred books you can read about this movement, and the safest bet it to check out Peter Biskin’s “Easy Riders, Raging Bulls” as a primer.

Like most people my age, New Hollywood is a sweet spot – and it was a real chore to limit myself to just eight underrepresented gems. My initial brainstorm had twenty-five titles that all fit the “obscure” and “great” parameters. Maybe I’ll revisit this column with a Volume II if there are calls for it in the comments. (The people have the power!)

Hats off to Twitter’s @MoviesByBowes for the suggestion. Read More »

We have quite a mixed bag of new images for you today, covering everything from supernatural teen romance to comic book adaptation. After the jump, get a look at the sci-fi not-quite-remake Dredd, the YA adaptation Beautiful Creatures, Tom Hooper‘s star-studded Les Misérables, Louis Leterrier‘s magician heist flick Now You See Me, and Brian De Palma‘s steamy thriller Passion.

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Briefly: Brian De Palma is nearly set to roll on Passion, his remake of Alain Corneau’s thriller Love Crime, with Rachel McAdams and Noomi Rapace in the lead roles. The film watches as a young businesswoman turns murderess when her boss and mentor steals one of her ideas.

Now Dominic Cooper (The Escapist, An Education, The Devil’s Double) and Karoline Herfurth (The Reader) are signing on to the film as well.  We don’t have any info on what parts they’ll play, though Herfurth may be a character named Dani, perhaps a gender-altered version of the character played by Guillaume Marquet in the original.

De Palma is known for a heightened visual style, and I’m now more excited to see footage from Passion because it is being shot by veteran cinematographer José Luis Alcaine, who may be best known for his extensive collaboration with Pedro Almodovar. (On Volver, The Skin I Live In, Bad Education, Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown and more.) That’s a great pairing. [MediaBiz via De Palma A La Mod and The Playlist]

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