Pinheads and Candymen: All Clive Barker Movies Ranked

hellraiser

Last week was the 25th anniversary of Candyman, and one horrendous physical effect aside, it still holds up beautifully today. Key among of strengths is a trait shared through almost all of the fiction written by horror author Clive Barker and the films that bring his work to the screen – a wicked, dark, and endless imagination.

From the earliest of his features in 1985 to the latest in 2009, they’ve run the gamut from instantly forgettable to instant classic, and while the stories are varied, that common thread between them remains. He creates worlds both gorgeous and grotesque, sometimes on the same page or frame. Ideally, he’ll soon see an adaptation resurgence similar to the one Stephen King is currently enjoying.

Until then, though, there are nine legitimate Clive Barker movies that are based on his work or feature his direct involvement, not counting sequels, shorts, and outliers. (Quicksilver Highway is an anthology only partially based on his work, The Plague sees him attached only as a producer, and Saint Sinner borrows the name from one of his comics but uses nothing from the plot.) So while we daydream a Hulu series based on The Great and Secret Show, a Guillermo del Toro adaptation of the brilliant “In the Hills, the Cities,” or Barker’s overdue return to the director’s chair with a face-off between Pinhead and Harry D’Amour in The Scarlet Gospels, these are the movies we’re left with… So why not rank them?

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book_of_blood-copy

Clive Barker keeps getting screwed of late, especially when it comes to film adaptations of his short works. First there was Midnight Meat Train, which Lionsgate dumped in dollar theatres like a deformed baby into a dumpster, and now the perfectly reasonable looking Book of Blood is going straight to DVD. (Where it will have exalted company this fall thanks to Paul Solet’s Grace.) Bloody Disgusting reports that the film will hit shelves on September 29, and they’ve got a new red band trailer, which you can see after the break, to prove it. Read More »