Spike Jonze and the Beastie Boys go way back, to 1994, ‘Sabotage,’ and the first volleys of a revival of the ’70s movie aesthetic. Their latest melding of the minds is a stop-motion animated video for the recent Beasties track ‘Don’t Play No Games That I Can’t Win,’ in which the band, guest Santigold and a host of other characters are all brought to life via old-school action figures. (Think big early Mego figures and first-wave G.I. Joes.)

The clip starts off pretty tame, but eventually veers into Dead Snow territory. Sound intriguing? Hit the jump. Read More »

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‘Fight For Your Right – Revisited’ Trailer

Boasting one of the most star-studded casts ever to grace a short film, Fight For Your Right – Revisited had its world premiere at Sundance in January. Directed by Beastie Boy Adam Yauch, it follows the rap legends after their classic ’80s music video Fight For Your Right and stars Elijah Wood, Seth Rogen, Danny McBride, Jack Black, John C. Reilly and Will Ferrell. Plus there are cameos by Susan Sarandon, Jason Schwartzman, Stanley Tucci, Will Arnett, Rainn Wilson and many more.

One of the main questions everyone asked when the film was announced was, when are we going to get to see it? Well, it seems like the full 30 minutes version will be released when the Beastie Boys put out their new album, Hot Sauce Committee Part Two, on May 3. Until then, you’ll just have to watch the trailer, which is embedded after the break. Read More »

How much would you pay to see Elijah Wood, Danny McBride, Seth Rogen, Will Ferrell, John C. Reilly and Jack Black all in one movie? If you said anything under the cost of a trip to Utah, you’re out of luck. They make up the cast of one of the most highly anticipated shorts playing at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival. It’s called Fight For Your Right Revisited and it’s written and directed by Adam Yauch, aka MCA of the legendary Beastie Boys. He’s assembled quite the cast to tell the story of what happens after the epic party in their classic 1987 music video for ‘(You Gotta) Fight For Your Right (To Party)’.

We told you about it on Monday and now we’ve got your first look at three of the stars – Rogen, Wood and McBride – as The Beastie Boys: Mike D, Ad-Rock, and MCA. Read more about the short after the jump. Read More »

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This article concludes /Film’s recaps and discussions for the third season of Breaking Bad. A spoiler warning applies after the jump for the recap and for the comments section. Meth heads welcome. For previous recaps, click here.

The season three finale, “Full Measures,” differed from those of previous seasons with a grisly cliffhanger that incidentally and tragically pushed one main character over the point of no return. Or did it? In recent days, the show’s creator, Vince Gilligan, has given three candid and revealing interviews wherein he’s cleared up a number of viewers’ apparent confusion over the very last scene. He’s done so in good humor, but I can’t recall a previous highly anticipated finale that needed the showmaker to later vouch his intent—and in Gilligan’s case he helmed the episode (his sole directorial effort of the season.) The initial confusion was due to the aim of a gun, which appeared to tilt to the right of the target before the trigger went off. And I’m guessing the immediate cut to black that followed only amplified some viewers’ doubts. “SMDH.” – David Chase.

Gilligan, who is refreshingly and perhaps too open about Breaking Bad‘s creative process, also stated that the writing team didn’t map the season’s arc at start, unlike they’ve done in the past. This revelation confirmed observations about the season’s touch-and-go feel cited in the previous recap with guest Sven Barth. After the jump, I address personal questions about the finale, where the show and characters are possibly headed, and analyze Gilligan’s post-ep comments. Thanks to the /Film commenters who left insightful and spirited opinions over the past dozen BB posts. Let us know what you thought of the finale and of the questions posed below.

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It’s a crazy, mixed up world and we are thankful for movies that offer proof. Slashfilm’s Weekend Weirdness examines such flicks, whether in the form of a premiere for a provocative indie, a mini review, or…GAH, bugs!

When I learned of Beetle Queen Conquers Tokyo, a documentary on the profitable Japanese subculture and love of insect collecting, my inner capitalist gave a high five to my slouching indie purist. A press release for the film highlighted a $57 rainbow beetle, the film’s website teased the recent $90,000 sale of a single specimen. Those nuts. I envisioned the film as an educational PBS special. Lots of well narrated close-ups on creepy-crawlies inside plastic containers, stacked high and labeled brightly, in bustling specialty shops. And the film begins like so.

At start, we see a young Japanese boy in a shop captivated by a “Kokasasu beetle!” and he shouts “Oh…I want it!” A hovering guardian suggests he’s likely short on cash. He counts his change, eventually settling on a beetle $10 cheaper. Later we see a group of young Japanese bug enthusiasts at home, referring to their hefty pet horn beetles as “kids” and dropping them into a “cage” to battle. Satisfied for a moment, they quickly stomp upstairs to examine more “kids,” and bypass the family dog. The dog looks bewildered. Outdated. But cute market-centric scenes like these make up only a small part of the film. Unexpectedly meditative and adorably hypnotic, Beetle Queen aspires to link the broad presence of bugs in Japanese culture from their role in popular video games to ancient religion; connecting fireflies to symbols of unrequited romance, dragonflies to symbols of the samurai.
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katamaran78 has created “Galactica: Sabotage”, a remake of Spike Jonze‘s now classic music video for the Beastie Boys song Sabotage, but edited together using footage from Battlestar Galactica. I was very impressed how the video was copied almost shot-for-shot, so much so the creator also released a side by side comparison of the two videos. Both of which can be viewed, after the jump.
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It’s a crazy, mixed up world and we are thankful for movies, sans The Tooth Fairy, that offer proof. Weekend Weirdness cocks its disoriented head to examine such flicks, whether it’s a new trailer for a provocative indie, an interview, or a mini review.

In this installment: a look at the new DVD Know Your Mushrooms, a breezy doc on fungi, of the magic variety and otherwise, with music by The Flaming Lips; the latest news on The Human Centipede, the increasingly nefarious, pukey ass-to-mouth horror flick now officially on its way to the States; an NYC public access DVD from Beastie Boys‘ pal Ricky Powell; a Brooklyn premiere party, a Michael Cera music video, and more! Btw: The above family portrait, inspired by my number one film of 2009, Observe & Report, is the latest work in a series by artist and /Film fave Kirk Demarais. …Buy it so I can steal it and cruise to Mexico blasting Little River Band’s “Help Is On Its Way” in a raffle convertible.

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Reasons for Sabotage in Star Trek?

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There seems to be more than a few complaints about JJ Abrams‘ use of the Beastie Boys‘ track Sabotage in the new Star Trek film. But it isn’t at all random, and not just inserted twenith centry pop culture. First off, the sequence in question is when 13-year-old James T Kirk steals his step-father’s antique convertable and drives it off a cliff.

I must give screenwriters Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci credit on this one. I believe this scene to be a multi-layed metaphor, and the choice of music might be a call back to William Shatner, who played the James T Kirk in the original series. Deconstruction and video after the jump.

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