The Fault in Our Stars poster header

Last year, screenwriters Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber brought us The Spectacular Now, a smart, tender YA adaptation about first love. This year, they’re mining similar territory with The Fault in Our Stars, based on John Green‘s bestselling novel. They even have Shailene Woodley starring once again.

This time, she plays Hazel Grace Lancaster, who falls for fellow cancer patient Augustus Waters (Ansel Elgort) after meeting him in a support group for sick teens. Josh Boone directs, with Nat Wolff, Laura Dern, Sam Trammell, and Mike Birbiglia in supporting roles. Watch the first trailer after the jump.

Read More »

.

Please Recommend /Film on Facebook

The Fault in Our Stars poster header

Shailene Woodley has two highly anticipated YA adaptations out this year, one of which (Divergent) is being touted as the next Hunger Games. And indeed, it has everything an on-trend teen flick needs right now: a dystopian setting, a kickass heroine, and plenty of action.

But for my money, the far more promising one is The Fault in Our Stars. Woodley plays Hazel Grace, who meets and falls for a boy (Ansel Elgort) in her cancer support group. While the premise has the potential to get real sappy real fast, the source material by John Green gained lots of fans, of all ages, for its honesty and wit.

If director Josh Boone manages to retain that vibe, this could be 2014′s The Spectacular Now. It certainly helps that he’s got the writers of The Spectacular Now, Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber, working with him here. Check out the first image from the movie after the jump.

Read More »

Divergent

Of the many, many YA properties vying to become the next Hunger Games, Divergent seems to have better odds than most. For one thing, the books by Veronica Roth are already a smash hit; for another, the dystopian premise sets up plenty of opportunities for white-knuckle action. Toss in a strong young cast led by Shailene Woodley, and it’s easy to see how Divergent could become the next big thing. Literally, even — the studio announced today that the film will be shown in IMAX when it opens next spring.

During today’s panel at Comic-Con, Summit showcased the first footage from the sci-fi thriller, featuring several of the best loved scenes from the books. Additionally, Roth was on hand to hint at what she has in store for the third book, Allegiant, due out this fall. Hit the jump for all the details. Read More »

Carrie

A couple generations after Brian de Palma first brought it to the big screen, Stephen King‘s Carrie is getting a new cinematic interpretation this fall by director Kimberly Peirce. The first teaser trailer hit all the way back last year, and we’ve had plenty of blood-soaked posters since then, but now we finally have a full-length trailer that offers a better idea of Peirce’s updated vision.

This version of the tale stars Chloë Grace Moretz as the telekinetic teen, and Julianne Moore as her unhinged religious mother. Gabriella Wilde, Portia Doubleday, Ansel Elgort, Alex Russell, and Judy Greer also appear. Hit the jump to watch the trailer.

Read More »

With Carrie‘s June 1 start date just around the corner, director Kimberly Peirce is adding the final touches to her cast. Leads Chloë Grace Moretz and Julianne Moore have been locked in since this spring, but it’s only in the past couple of weeks that the production has been staffing up on supporting players.

Chronicle star Alex Russell and theater actor Ansel Elgort signed on earlier this month, and now we’re hearing that Judy Greer, Ivana Baquero (Pan’s Labyrinth), and Gabriella Wilde (The Three Musketeers) are circling three key supporting roles. More details after the jump.

Update: Sources say this casting info isn’t yet set, so we’ll report further as official word is released.

Read More »

Typically, it’s the French New Wave that gets all the news, but Japan had its own New Wave in the ’60s, and one of the key players, whether he would have said as much or not, was Suzuki Seijun. The director worked for Nikkatsu studios, and in the ’60s he started to crank out studio films that grew weirder with each release. One of the formative films in that period was Youth of the Beast, starring the chipmunk-cheeked Shishido Joe.

Though not as wild as some of Suzuki’s later films, Youth of the Beast is a great, weird film. And now it will be remade by John Woo, who will call his version Day of the Beast. Rob Frisbee scripted, and Woo’s long-time producer Terence Chang will produce. Ironically, while Nikkatsu eventually fired Suzuki for his increasingly eccentric films, this production is part of the studio’s 100th Anniversary.

After the break, there’s a trailer for the original Youth of the Beast, and we’ve got some news on the new version of Carrie, and one of the prime movers behind the original Little Shop of Horrors speaks about the new film version of that story. Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web: