red-riding_12

It’s a crazy, mixed up world and we are thankful for movies, excluding The Spy Next Door and The Tooth Fairy, that offer proof. /Film’s Weekend Weirdness examines such flicks, whether in the form of a new trailer for a provocative indie, a mini review, or an interview. In this installment, new trailers and a review of the Red Riding Trilogy, a noirish triptych of serial killer dramas imported from British television and being released stateside in February by IFC Films.

During a screening of the entire Red Riding Trilogy, with one intermission allotted for lunch, I found myself pondering the irony in three directors, one screenwriter, one author, tens of actors and three separate crews realizing a project that depicts humanity and bureaucracy at its most foul and irreversibly corrupt. A recent poster for the trilogy forebodingly reads, “Evil Lives Here,” a tagline that would serve most of the work that exits Stephen King’s skull; instead the “here” in Red Riding is Northern England in the ’70s and early ’80s, when a serial killer known as the Yorkshire Ripper carved a trail of female victims and set a mood and mythos ripe for social reflection.

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Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: I celebrate all levels of trailers and hopefully this column will satisfactorily give you a baseline of what beta wave I’m operating on, because what better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising? Some of the best authors will tell you that writing a short story is a lot harder than writing a long one, that you have to weigh every sentence. What better medium to see how this theory plays itself out beyond that than with movie trailers?

Read More »

Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: I celebrate all levels of trailers and hopefully this column will satisfactorily give you a baseline of what beta wave I’m operating on, because what better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising? Some of the best authors will tell you that writing a short story is a lot harder than writing a long one, that you have to weigh every sentence. What better medium to see how this theory plays itself out beyond that than with movie trailers?

Read More »

Leap Year Movie Trailer

Leap Year

Universal Pictures has released the first movie trailer for Leap Year, which is a romantic comedy about a woman who has an elaborate scheme to propose to her boyfriend on Leap Day.

Amy Adams and Matthew Goode star in Leap Year, a romantic comedy that follows one woman’s determined quest to get married to the perfect guy…despite what fate has in store for her. When their four-year anniversary passes without a marriage proposal, Anna (Amy Adams) decides to take matters into her own hands. Investing in an Irish tradition that allows women to propose to men on February 29th, Anna decides to follow her boyfriend Jeremy (Adam Scott) to Dublin and get down on one knee herself. But airplanes, weather and fate leave Anna stranded on the other side of Ireland, and she must enlist the help of handsome and surly Declan (Matthew Goode) to get her across the country. As Anna and Declan bicker across the Emerald Isle, they discover that the road to love can take you to very unexpected places.

From Anand Tucker, the director of Shopgirl and Hilary and Jackie, and based on a screenplay by Slumdog Millionaire writer Simon Beaufoy and Can’t Hardly Wait scribes Harry Elfont and Deborah Kaplan, comes another middle of the road romantic comedy where the female character appears to be reduced to a marriage obsessed spaz. I’d love to say that I’ll never see this film, but sadly, I’ll watch almost any movie that Amy Adams is involved in. Watch the trailer after the jump, and leave your thoughts in the comments below.

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red-riding_1

This is what festivals are for, even if you’re not able to attend. Scanning the Telluride coverage that came in over the weekend, a few films really stand out. Most of them are known quantities: Up in the Air, An Education, A Prophet. We knew those were ones to watch. But there’s another entry in the must-see column out of Telluride. Or, rather, three entries. Suddenly the trilogy of UK films collectively called Red Riding is getting massive praise and buzz. Read More »

Slumdog Scribe to Write Leap Year

Simon Beaufoy, the Academy Award-nominated screenwriter of Slumdog Millionaire, has been hired to write Leap Year for Spyglass Entertainment. Shopgirl director Anand Tucker is set to helm the romantic comedy which stars Amy Adams as a woman who comes up with an idea to travel to Dublin to propose to a man on February 29th, when according to Irish tradition, men must say yes. And as would be expected in the romantic comedy genre, she comes against various difficulties along the way.

The screenplay that attracted both Tucker and Adams to the project was originally written by Harry Elfont and Deb Kaplan, the duo behind Can’t Hardly Wait (one of my favorite teen movies) and A Very Brady Sequel (one of my favorite television to film adaptations). No reason was given as to why they are doing a complete rewrite, but with someone like Simon attached, I don’t think a reason is really necessary.

source: THR

Anand Tucker to Direct Amy Adams in Leap Year

Shopgirl director Anand Tucker is in talks to helm the Amy Adams romantic comedy Leap Year for Spyglass. Adams will play a woman who comes up with an idea to travel to Dublin to propose to a man on February 29th, when according to Irish tradition, men must say yes. And as would be expected in the romantic comedy genre, she comes against various difficulties along the way.

It might sounds like a typical romantic comedy, but the screenplay was written by Harry Elfont and Deb Kaplan, the duo behind Can’t Hardly Wait (one of my favorite teen movies) and A Very Brady Sequel (one of my favorite television to film adaptations). And yes, it is a slow news day — I guess the Thanksgiving Holiday is already in full effect. Principal photography is set to be begin in March 2009.

source: Variety

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