Rosemary's Baby tv teaser

Plenty of movies have taken inspiration from Rosemary’s Baby over the decades, including, recently, Hell Baby and Devil’s Due. But NBC is going the direct route by simply adapting Ira Levin‘s original novel into a four-part miniseries.

Zoe Saldana and Patrick J. Adams play Rosemary and her husband Guy, a young couple who’ve just moved from New York to Paris. When they discover that she is pregnant with their first child, they’re initially thrilled. But joy turns to fear as strange things begin to happen.

While it’s not technically a remake of Roman Polanski‘s movie, the comparisons are going to be inevitable. So how does this new version stack up? Watch the first Rosemary’s Baby tv teaser after the jump and judge for yourself.

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Rosemary's Baby Remake First Look

Remake creators will often proclaim that any given remake is a new take on material, and that it won’t look much at all like a previous film. And yet the first materials released always seem to look quite a lot like that original film. Take Rosemary’s Baby as an example. The NBC mini-series adapts Ira Levin’s original novel with Zoe Saldana, Patrick J. Adams and Jason Isaacs starring in the tale of a young woman who begins to suspect that her pregnancy has been controlled by neighbors with nefarious intentions.

Here’s our first look at Rosemary’s Baby via two photos, and the echo of Roman Polanski’s original film is definitely in one. 

Update: We’ve got better versions of these images, and a new poster to go along with them.

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out-of-furnace-zoe-saldana

NBC is ready to birth a new version of Rosemary’s Baby, based on the same Ira Levin novel that was adapted into Roman Polanski’s landmark film of the same name. And while this new four-hour miniseries is said to be based more on the book than the film, let’s not kid ourselves — it will be very difficult to keep Polanski’s influence from creeping in. Scott Abbott scripted this take.

In this version, Rosemary will be played by Zoe Saldana, which was announced today by Deadline. Read More »

NBC Plans ‘Rosemary’s Baby’ Miniseries

Rosemary's Baby

Having brought Hannibal Lecter and Dracula to television with some success, NBC’s now got its sights on another classic horror property. The Peacock is turning Rosemary’s Baby into a four-hour miniseries, to be directed by Agnieszka Holland (HBO’s The Wire, Europa Europa). Details on the new version, including how it’ll differ from Roman Polanski‘s iconic 1968 film, after the jump.

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The Best WWII Movies You Probably Haven’t Seen

This friday Agnieszka Holland’s In Darkness opens in New York and Los Angeles. It ought to have a decent run at art houses in select cities after that, particularly if it wins the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film this year. (If anything is poised to upset A Separation, it’s this one.)

In In Darkness, Holland, director of Europa, Europa and a few key episodes of The Wire, tells a fascinating true story of a group of Polish Jews who survived for over one year in a city’s sewer system. In the press notes she commented that, just when we thought we’d heard all the World War II stories, she discovered this one. It got me thinking that, yes, not only are there a number of great World War II stories out there that haven’t been told, there are already so many that deserve to be rediscovered by a new audience.

So, with that, let’s set the way-back machine to the madness of mid-century and check out some tremendous art that grew from tragedy.

More Movies You Probably Havent Seen:

The Grey Zone (2001); Tim Blake Nelson, director

We’ll kick this one off with one of the most depressing and difficult to watch movies I’ve ever seen.

For those that felt Schindler’s List candy-coated the horrors of the Nazi extermination camps, I offer The Grey Zone. No narrative film has more directly detailed the functions and living conditions at Auschwitz as Tim Blake Nelson’s story of a rebellious group of Sonderkommando. The Sonderkommando, if you don’t know, were the groups of healthy, young Jews who were kept alive and forced to aid the the machinery of death at the camp. Yeah, pretty bleak stuff.

The story of this impossible revolt (and there were others – check out Jean-Francois Steiner’s book Treblinka for a similar tale) is a fascinating portrait of bravery in the face of insurmountable odds and absolute evil.

Hope and Glory (1987); John Boorman, director

Okay, we need to lighten up a little bit, and quick.

Hope and Glory is told from the point of view of a ten year old boy who, despite a vague understanding of distant suffering, thinks World War II is the greatest thing that ever happened to him. School is constantly cancelled, the London blitz offers new destroyed houses to stomp around in and he gets to spend some nights sleeping in the subway station.

It’s hard to make the war seem fun without being flip but Boorman’s quasi-autobiographical tale does the trick. It features a wide and wonderful cast of characters, the full tapestry of British society that held that country together. Among my favorites, the men rejected by the fighting army but relegated to the secretarial pool, puffing their chests and reminding themselves that “we’re typing for England!”

The Best Years of Our Lives (1946); William Wyler, director

After the bullets fly and the flags are planted, the war still rages within the minds of the men who fought it.

Best Picture winner The Best Years of Our Lives was one of the first American films that showed the psychological damage done not only on the battlefield, but on the homefront as well.

Three men of different social classes meet after the war on their way back to a fictional midwestern city. Each finds it difficult to reintegrate into their previous lives. There’s drinking, flashbacks, marital regret, love affairs and adjustments to physical handicaps. The Best Years of Our Lives is basically soap opera, but it is striking to see such issues framed in the conventions of 1940s cinema.

The Best Years of Our Lives won a whole slew of awards, including a Best Supporting nod for “non-actor” Harold Russell, a war veteran who lost both of his hands. Don’t judge this movie too harshly by the clip shown above (one of the few I could find.) Once you get into it, it really is quite good.

Stalingrad (1993); Joseph Vilsmaier, director

Okay, back to the action.

It was Wolfgang Peterson’s 1981 masterpiece Das Boot that made it “okay” to root for Germans in a World War II film provided that a) we were on the side of simple soldiers caught up in the larger machinations of war and b) lots of Germans died. Stalingrad takes this formula and runs it head-on into the ice cold hell that was the Battle of Stalingrad.

Joseph Vilsmaier’s epic features sieges, tank battles, the horrors of penal colonies, assaults on civilians, survivalism and an examination of loyalty versus common sense. There were 260,000 men in Germany’s 6th Army who went to Stalingrad. 6000 returned.

Continue Reading The Best WWII Movies You Probably Haven’t Seen

The sixty-three films eligible for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 2012 Oscars have been culled down to nine movies, and the resulting list is a bit surprising. Not making the cut is The Flowers of War, with Christian Bale, or Miss Bala, the Mexican film that did well at festivals last year.

Meanwhile the Belgian film Bullhead, which got a good reception at Fantastic Fest, did make the list, as did likely favorite to win A Separation, which took home a Golden Globe this past weekend.

Get the full list after the break. Read More »

The Telluride Film Festival, a presentation of the National Film Preserve which takes place beginning tomorrow, Friday Sept 2 and runs through Monday Sept 5, is an unusual beast as far as film festivals go. The core film lineup is not announced until the day before the festival begins, so attendees have to commit to the fest without knowing any of the movies that will definitely play.

Now the first list of films is out, and it has some expected inclusions such as David Cronenberg‘s A Dangerous Method (trailer) and the Cannes fave The Artist (trailer). In addition there are some good surprises, such as Steve McQueen and Michael Fassbender‘s reunion, Shame (pics), and the Dardenne BrothersThe Kid With a Bike.

More films will be announced at the last minute over the next couple days. One addition, for example, according to Kris Tapley, is Butter. Peter is arriving in Telluride later today so he’ll have coverage of the festival during the holiday weekend. Check out the announced lineup below. Read More »

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