‘Cave of Forgotten Dreams’ Trailer #2

We’ve seen one trailer for Werner Herzog‘s first foray into 3D, the documentary Cave of Forgotten Dreams, but this new trailer from Sundance Selects works a bit better than the initial edit. I’m still quite curious to see how this actually looks in 3D, but for now the old-fashioned 2D presentation will do.

I can’t tell you too much more about the film, not having had a chance to see it yet, so let’s go back to the TIFF recap of the movie, published in advance of the film’s premiere at the fest last year:

Werner Herzog is a wizard at conjuring unforgettable visions..Now he brings us the earliest known visions of mankind: the Chauvet-Pont-d’Arc cave art of southern France, created more than thirty thousand years ago. By comparison, the famous cave art of Lascaux is roughly half as old. Since Chauvet’s discovery in 1994, access has been extremely restricted due to concerns that overexposure, even to human breath, could damage the priceless drawings. Only a small number of researchers have ever seen the art in person.

Herzog gained extraordinary permission to film the caves using lights that emit no heat. But Herzog being Herzog, this is no simple act of documentation. He initially resisted shooting in 3D, then embraced the process, and now it’s hard to imagine the film any other way. The 3D format proves essential in communicating the contoured surfaces on which the charcoal figures are drawn. Beyond the walls, Herzog uses 3D to render the cave’s stalagmites like a crystal cathedral and to capture stunning aerial shots of the nearby Pont-d’Arc natural bridge. His probing questions for the cave specialists also plunge deep; for instance: “What constitutes humanness?”

Check the trailer in HD at Apple.

CAVE OF FORGOTTEN DREAMS, a breathtaking new 3D documentary from the incomparable Werner Herzog (ENCOUNTERS AT THE END OF THE WORLD, GRIZZLY MAN) follows an exclusive expedition into the nearly inaccessible Chauvet Cave in France, home to the most ancient visual art known to have been created by man. A hit at this year’s Toronto Film Festival, CAVE OF FORGOTTEN DREAMS is an unforgettable cinematic experience that provides a unique glimpse of pristine artwork dating back to human hands over 30,000 years ago — almost twice as old as any previous discovery.

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

.

Please Recommend /Film on Facebook

blog comments powered by Disqus