ilm 40th anniversary

2015 marks the 40th anniversary of Industrial Light and Magic, the most revered special effects company in the world. It was famously created by George Lucas in 1975 to help make his movie, Star Wars, and has since gone on to basically create almost every single big special effects movie or moment you can remember or imagine. (With a few exceptions.)

Below, you can see a jaw-dropping, one-minute montage of their 40 year history, up to and including Star Wars: The Force Awakens later this year. Check out the ILM 40th anniversary video below. Read More »

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Apple television

After the iPod, iPhone, iPad and iWatch, everyone was expecting o see Apple’s iTV. In his biography, Steve Jobs revealed the company was secretly working on a brand new Apple television set that would revolutionize how we watch TV. Tim Cook has since reiterated that idea, so every time the company announced a keynote, the question arose. “Will Apple reveal their TV set?” And while the rumors of the device’s existence have persisted, there hasn’t been more than a peep of anything official. Now we know why.

Turns out Apple was developing a television set, but abandoned those plans over a year ago because they couldn’t come up with anything revolutionary enough. Read more about the Apple Television set below. Read More »

Ang Lee 120 frames

Twenty-four frames per second has served us just fine for almost a hundred years. Modern technology, however, always strives for more, and filmmakers recently began to experiment with a higher frame rate. Shooting at higher frame rates would, in theory, make a moving image more realistic (because more info is being fed to us) and make it much more open to manipulation.

James Cameron is considering making the Avatar sequels in a higher frame rate and we all know Peter Jackson shot The Hobbit trilogy in 48 frames per second. That experiment is considered a failure because of the public outcry against the result, but I’m sure Jackson himself is happy with the raw results, even if audiences never saw it the way he intended.

Now, another filmmaker who has been flirting with high frame rate is taking a dive into that world. Sony executives confirmed that Ang Lee will shoot his next project, the Iraq war film Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk, at 120 frames per second. Read the Ang Lee 120 frames news below. Read More »

IMAX Laser Projection System

Most people would agree the best theatrical movie experience is 70mm IMAX film projection. With IMAX Laser, the company’s aim was to try and replace – and hopefully even surpass – that experience. They’ve succeeded.

Earlier this month, IMAX debuted the first IMAX Laser projection system in the United States at the TCL Chinese Theater in Hollywood, CA. This system is 60% brighter than traditional film projection, with darker blacks and whiter whites creating a contrast that is exponentially better than 70mm IMAX projection. “You haven’t seen a movie until you’ve seen it in IMAX Laser at the TCL Chinese,” said Alwyn Hight Kusher, the president of the theater. That might be a slight overstatement, but IMAX Laser is definitely another evolutionary step in the theatrical experience.

Below, watch a video about IMAX Laser projection and read some more details. Read More »

Google Patents Social Media Spoiler Software

google spoilers software

There are few things more frustrating than the speed with which the Internet posts spoilers. The second a character dies on TV, there are hundreds of online articles about it, and thousands of tweets. If there’s a surprise in a movie? Good luck holding that for the opening. The second something is seen, avoiding the spoiler is like navigating a mine field. Your Twitter, Facebook, and daily conversations all become potential places to be spoiled.

Now, in their continuing bid for world domination, Google has created a software to protect you from that. It learns what shows, books and movies you watch and then will blur out social media spoilers until you are ready to read them. Find out more about the Google spoiler software below. Read More »

Prima Cinema

Hollywood and the movie theaters have finally figured out a system they agree on to screen first run movies in your house. It costs $35,000 for the hardware and a $500 per rental.

A company called PRIMA Cinema has created a system that allows people to watch movies opening in theaters in their homes. The $35,000 hardware includes multiple failsafes to ensure the film looks and sounds great. It also includes a separate biometric security system so only the person who is authorized to watch the movie is watching the movie. After that, each rental is $500 but you are required to pre buy 10 movies at the start, so the whole system costs $40,000. Read More »

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VOTD: New THX Intro Goes Ethereal

new thx intro

When a THX intro plays in front of a movie, you know you’re in for a treat. The movie may be terrible but you know that it’s going to look and sound great. That knowledge made the old school THX intros a sort of comfort blanket for film fans. A guarantee of quality in an industry where crap is often good enough.

Now, a new intro is out there and it’s a bit more ethereal than we’re used to. There aren’t any mechanical flowers or flying robots; it’s just a journey into deep space. Check out the new THX intro below. Read More »

imax laser projection

For several years, IMAX has been working on a revolutionary new laser projection system. Projection technology that blows away digital and film in terms of clarity and contrast. Well, out of nowhere that technology is now. Literally.

IMAX will publicly debut laser projection at Wednesday world premiere of Furious 7 at the TCL Chinese Theater in Los Angeles, California. It’ll remain in the venue indefinitely. Read more about IMAX laser projection below. Read More »

will 35mm film survive

35mm film continues to fight for its life. Last year, a few high profiled filmmakers vowed to continue to use film stock on their films. Now the last remaining manufacturer of film, Kodak, has just signed deals with Disney, Fox, Paramount, Sony, NBC Universal and Warner Bros. – basically every big studio in Hollywood – to “purchase undisclosed amounts of film over ‘a few’ years that would be enough to extend Kodak’s film manufacturing business.” So will 35mm film survive? Read more about the answer below. Read More »