Star Wars Battlefront

Reading Star Wars Bits ain’t like dusting crops, boy. Here’s what we have from a galaxy far, far away today:

  • The Force Awakens production designer at San Diego Comic-Con
  • Behind the Scenes of the Star Wars Weekends creative campaign
  • Details and cover art from deluxe edition of Star Wars Battlefront
  • Details on some tracks from The Force Awakens score
  • George Lucas and Kathleen Kennedy mourn passing of Christopher Lee
  • Weird Al Yankovic records an a capella version of his song Yoda
  • Secret Cinema’s Empire Strikes Back event is now open
  • Star Wars Rebels characters join Disney Infinity 3.0
  • Rumored details on locations, aliens and more in Star Wars: Rogue One
  • New shots of Star Wars: The Force Awakens Black Series Stormtrooper
  • Industrial Light & Magic working on Star Wars virtual reality experience

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Hateful Eight 70mm

Quentin Tarantino is a standard-bearer for the preservation of film in filmmaking, from the use of celluloid rather than digital when shooting a movie to the projection of film prints at his “no digital allowed” New Beverly Theatre in Los Angeles. Tarantino shot his latest film, The Hateful Eight, in the elite 70mm format — in fact, he used an even more rare variant of the 70mm format, called Ultra Panavision 70, which results in a very wide image.

Having gone to all that effort to shoot the film in a rare format, Tarantino evidently wants to exhibit the film in the same large format. A new report says that he has helped put 70mm projectors equipped with the proper anamorphic gear into fifty theaters worldwide. Read More »

Showtime Streaming Service

Showtime has finally announced their stand alone streaming service which allow viewers to enjoy every episode of every season of the pay cabler’s original series and select movies without a cable subscription. The Showtime streaming service will undercut HBO’s streaming service HBO Now. Fine out the details, after the jump.
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Winston in Feast

We’re always wondering what’s next for the movies. Since film’s inception as a storytelling form we’ve seen the addition of sound, color, bigger screens, third and fourth dimensions, and more. Now we’re at a point where the physical theater has become the major constraint. Some filmmakers are looking smaller for the next big thing.

Google has begun making short films called Spotlight Stories. These are movies you experience in 360 degrees on your smartphone using an app. Not only has Justin Lin made a movie for the series, Google has just signed Aardman Animations, as well as Patrick Osborne, the Oscar-winning director of Disney’s short film Feast. His movie will be called Pearl. You can read more about it, and Google Spotlight Stories, below. Read More »

ilm 40th anniversary

2015 marks the 40th anniversary of Industrial Light and Magic, the most revered special effects company in the world. It was famously created by George Lucas in 1975 to help make his movie, Star Wars, and has since gone on to basically create almost every single big special effects movie or moment you can remember or imagine. (With a few exceptions.)

Below, you can see a jaw-dropping, one-minute montage of their 40 year history, up to and including Star Wars: The Force Awakens later this year. Check out the ILM 40th anniversary video below. Read More »

Apple television

After the iPod, iPhone, iPad and iWatch, everyone was expecting o see Apple’s iTV. In his biography, Steve Jobs revealed the company was secretly working on a brand new Apple television set that would revolutionize how we watch TV. Tim Cook has since reiterated that idea, so every time the company announced a keynote, the question arose. “Will Apple reveal their TV set?” And while the rumors of the device’s existence have persisted, there hasn’t been more than a peep of anything official. Now we know why.

Turns out Apple was developing a television set, but abandoned those plans over a year ago because they couldn’t come up with anything revolutionary enough. Read more about the Apple Television set below. Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

Ang Lee 120 frames

Twenty-four frames per second has served us just fine for almost a hundred years. Modern technology, however, always strives for more, and filmmakers recently began to experiment with a higher frame rate. Shooting at higher frame rates would, in theory, make a moving image more realistic (because more info is being fed to us) and make it much more open to manipulation.

James Cameron is considering making the Avatar sequels in a higher frame rate and we all know Peter Jackson shot The Hobbit trilogy in 48 frames per second. That experiment is considered a failure because of the public outcry against the result, but I’m sure Jackson himself is happy with the raw results, even if audiences never saw it the way he intended.

Now, another filmmaker who has been flirting with high frame rate is taking a dive into that world. Sony executives confirmed that Ang Lee will shoot his next project, the Iraq war film Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk, at 120 frames per second. Read the Ang Lee 120 frames news below. Read More »

IMAX Laser Projection System

Most people would agree the best theatrical movie experience is 70mm IMAX film projection. With IMAX Laser, the company’s aim was to try and replace – and hopefully even surpass – that experience. They’ve succeeded.

Earlier this month, IMAX debuted the first IMAX Laser projection system in the United States at the TCL Chinese Theater in Hollywood, CA. This system is 60% brighter than traditional film projection, with darker blacks and whiter whites creating a contrast that is exponentially better than 70mm IMAX projection. “You haven’t seen a movie until you’ve seen it in IMAX Laser at the TCL Chinese,” said Alwyn Hight Kusher, the president of the theater. That might be a slight overstatement, but IMAX Laser is definitely another evolutionary step in the theatrical experience.

Below, watch a video about IMAX Laser projection and read some more details. Read More »

Google Patents Social Media Spoiler Software

google spoilers software

There are few things more frustrating than the speed with which the Internet posts spoilers. The second a character dies on TV, there are hundreds of online articles about it, and thousands of tweets. If there’s a surprise in a movie? Good luck holding that for the opening. The second something is seen, avoiding the spoiler is like navigating a mine field. Your Twitter, Facebook, and daily conversations all become potential places to be spoiled.

Now, in their continuing bid for world domination, Google has created a software to protect you from that. It learns what shows, books and movies you watch and then will blur out social media spoilers until you are ready to read them. Find out more about the Google spoiler software below. Read More »