final interstellar trailer

There’s no denying the visceral power and prowess of Christopher Nolan‘s Intersellar. The ninth film from the popular director is his most ambitious, and it looks jaw-droppingly gorgeous. The sets, miniatures, and images of space travel and planets all combine to make a film the scope of which rivals any other space movie.

Emotionally, the film comes close to achieving a similarly momentous effect. Interstellar follows Coop (Matthew McConaughey), a father forced to leave his family in a possibly mad attempt to preserve the future of humanity by finding another habitable planet. The tale is filled with drama, humor, intense action and surprising plot twists. There’s rarely a dull moment in the movie because the story is so compelling and poignant.

But maybe it’s all a bit too much. The script, by Nolan and his brother Jonathan, packs ideas and theories in every single scene. Concepts about love, survival, physics, and time burst from the film more prominently than the emotion and visuals. Even with a nearly three-hour runtime, so many ideas are presented that the film rarely has time to focus on one over another. The result is a technical marvel with a powerful narrative that ends up feeling a tad empty because we aren’t sure exactly which point it’s trying to make. Read More »

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Interstellar daughter

Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar is one of the most ambitious, visually spectacular films I’ve sen this year. But it’s also a film with some really deep problems. In many ways, it highlights Nolan’s best and worst tendencies: his penchant for intricate, convoluted stories, his tendency to elide character work to move the plot along, and his knack for breathtaking visuals.

Hit the jump for my full video review of Interstellar. I discuss basic plot details about the film, but nothing I would consider spoilers. That being said, consider yourself warned.
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John Wick review

Ninety percent of action movies are derivative. Carbon copies of better movies that came before them. They can be enjoyable, but are often forgettable. Then there’s the other ten percent. Those movies are something special. They originate and innovate, and rise about the rest by being different and surprising. However, by definition, even the best of the best employ many of the same beats. Punching, kicking, shooting, and explosions are the building blocks of an action movie. The ninety percent use them in ways we’ve seen before. The rest mix them up in ways we don’t expect. John Wick is among the ten percent.

In the first film by accomplished stunt coordinators Chad Stahelski and David Leitch, Keanu Reeves stars as an unstoppable assassin hell-bent on revenge after thugs steal his car and kill his dog. We’ve seen the assassin revenge story a hundred times, but John Wick feels different because it’s set in a unique, dirty, and lived-in world. Everyone has a reputation. Connections. They know each other. This is a place with a rich history simmering below the surface action of guns, choke holds and car crashes. What makes John Wick a standout action film is that it makes us curious. Read More »

birdman81

I saw Birdman Wednesday night at an advanced screening in downtown Seattle. I don’t think my audience knew what to make of it. It definitely suffers from many of the issues that Alejandro Gonzalez Innaritu’s films typically fall prey to: overwrought dialogue; characters who serve as symbols or ideas nothing more; and a bit too much fixation on misery and regret.

Still, I loved Birdman and can’t stop thinking about it. Hit the jump for my video review, and share your thoughts on the film in the comments below.
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Fury international trailer

David Ayer’s Fury is a solid film. If features great performances all around, the tank battles are legitimately thrilling, and there is some really unsettling imagery that lands the message of how war is hell. But the film, like many of Ayer’s other movies, glorifies the idea of being part of an unflinching brotherhood in the face of unspeakable odds. And that’s simply not the message I took away from watching it.

Hit the jump to see my full video review of Fury.
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Richard Kelly Gone Girl
I’ve always loved hearing filmmakers discuss movies. We’ve often printed interviews where we ask filmmakers about their favorite films and the /Filmcast has tried to bring on directors to review the latest big screen movies. That hasn’t been as constant of a feature as David Chen and I originally planned, because as it turns out, people in the movie industry generally don’t like to publicly bas other filmmaker’s projects and we generally only got yeses from those directors who had a positive take on the film at hand. But I’ve always enjoyed hearing filmmakers discuss the movies they love and the current state of cinema.

Richard Kelly, writer/director of Donnie Darko, Southland Tales, and The Box, has always made his opinions and himself very accessible (actually, I almost wish he wouldn’t have explained the intentions and meanings behind his films, as they serve better as mysteries with no definitive answer). And this week, like many of us, he saw David Fincher‘s latest film Gone Girl and wrote a bit about it on his blog. Find out more about the Richard Kelly Gone Girl review, after the jump.
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Horns review

All good films get two things right: pace and tone. You can have the most gorgeous visuals, best performances, incredibly well-written script, but if the director doesn’t keep the movie moving forward with a consistent feel, it can all fall apart. Alexandre Aja‘s Horns is a textbook example of this.

Based on a revered novel by Joe Hill (the son of Stephen King), Horns tells the story of a man named Iggy. Played by Daniel Radcliffe, Ig’s accused of killing his long time girlfriend (Juno Temple). His whole Northwestern hometown is sure he did it and, in his despair, Ig mysteriously begins growing a pair of horns. The horns give him incredible powers, and Ig uses them to try and solve the murder.

Right there, you can tell this is going to be difficult. How do you make a murder mystery with religious overtones, a pop sensibility, humor, and Harry Potter? The truth is there’s no real answer as Aja’s film combines lots of strong elements that never quite come together in a cohesive manner. Read More »

Everly Review

With Everly, director Joe Lynch answers the age old question, just how much action can you stage in a single room? The answer, not surprising, is a lot. Salma Hayek is the title character, a hooker turned informant who has just been discovered by her employer. Her mission is to stay alive over the next few hours in hopes she can save her family. And over that time, she’ll be forced to stay in the apartment because of the seemingly non-stop barrage of people coming to kill her.

Written by Yale Hannon, from a story by he and Lynch, Everly sounds like a pretty simple movie and it is. It’s also a Christmas movie, giving this one woman vs. the world, in a confined space, film a decidedly and deliberate Die Hard vibe. The film never reaches the heights of that classic, but it keeps us suitably engaged because we never ever know what’s going to come through that door next. Read the rest of our Everly review below. Read More »

gotham-red

From a marketing standpoint, Fox’s Gotham already had the deck stacked heavily in its favor. It’s a gritty superhero origin story, at a time when gritty superhero origin stories are doing massive business. And the superhero in question isn’t some indie-comic third-stringer, but one of the most iconic, most beloved superheroes of all time. Those facts alone would be enough to make Gotham one of the most buzzed-about new shows of the 2014-2015 season, even without a seasoned, capable creator (Bruno Heller, of Rome and The Mentalist) and a thoroughly solid cast (Ben McKenzie, Donal Logue, Jada Pinkett-Smith).

But from a creative standpoint, that very same advantage — Gotham‘s familiarity — proves to be a major liability. It’s an antihero crime drama in a pop culture landscape already saturated with antihero crime dramas, and these particular antiheroes are already extremely well known. By the show’s very nature, there’s little question as to where most of its characters will end up, which drastically lowers the dramatic tension. Were Gotham not a Batman prequel, we might be left wondering whether Jim Gordon (McKenzie) could possibly make good on his promise to clean up the city, or whether Bruce Wayne’s traumatic childhood would forge a hero or a villain. As it is, we already know exactly what the answers are.

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