the shape of water

Thank the movie gods for Guillermo del Toro. One of our best living filmmakers, del Toro crafts gorgeous, poetic films that combine genres to great effect. No one working today is making movies like the Crimson Peak filmmaker, and with The Shape of Water, del Toro may have made his masterpiece.

The Shape of Water is a poetic love story set during the Cold War, after John F. Kennedy’s Camelot has come to a tragic close. “The end of Camelot [was] the peak of the promise of the future,” del Toro said, “jet-fin cars, super fast kitchens, television, everything that if you’re white, Anglo-Saxon, heterosexual, you’re good. But if you’re anything else, you’re not so good. Then when Kennedy is shot and Vietnam escalates, and the disillusionment of that dream occurs, I don’t think that has healed.”

This is a love story, yes, but it’s about so much more. As is his custom, del Toro builds an entire world, and populates it with memorable, believable characters. The Shape of Water is also a fairy tale, and all good fairy tales need a princess.

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darkest hour review

It’s been a surprisingly big year for Dunkirk. Earlier this year, Lone Scherfig’s Their Finest and Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk both told stories about the evacuation of British troops from the beach at Dunkirk during World War II. Now Joe Wright, who also chronicled the events of Dunkirk in Atonement, tells yet another version of this story with Darkest Hour.

Darkest Hour is the behind-the-scenes look at not so much the evacuation itself, but the events leading up the evacuation. The film’s main focus is British Prime Minister Winston Churchill. Like Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln, Darkest Hour isn’t so much a biopic of a famous politician but rather a week-in-the-life type tale. As the film opens, parliament has lost faith in Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain (Ronald Pickup) for underestimating the nazi threat.

Chamberlain is forced to resign, and the only man the parties seem to be willing to back is Churchill. But while he may have party support, Churchill will soon find his new position is even more challenging than he could’ve imagined.

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current war tiff

The last thing cinema needs right now is another movie about a brilliant man whose brilliance is expressed through being a stubborn jerk. We already have a wealth of these artist as needlessly mean, antisocial guy portraits, and to keep adding more at this point goes well beyond beating a dead horse.

But Me and Earl and the Dying Girl director Alfonso Gomez-Rejon manages to get some great milage by taking such a setup and approaching it through a deconstructed lense with The Current War. The brilliant jerk in question this time is none other than the Wizard of Menlo Park himself, Thomas Edison. Edison, that brilliant inventor and sometimes thief, is played by Benedict Cumberbatch, an actor who has made almost an entire career playing brilliant jerks. It’s typecasting to the nth degree, but it also works. Cumberbatch brings an amusing, detached air to Edison, playing the genius as an overly competitive, short-tempered savant who wants to slap his name on everything.
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Molly's Game Reviews

The Toronto International Film Festival is in full swing, and one of the movies we were most excited to hear about was the directorial debut of The Social Network and A Few Good Men writer Aaron Sorkin. If the reviews from the festival are any indicator, not only does Sorkin have another fantastic movie to add to his career, but Jessica Chastain can add another acclaimed performance to her résumé.

Molly’s Game follows a former Olympic skier who turned from the sudden end of her athletic career to a thriving business throwing poker games for Hollywood celebrities, business tycoons and plenty of exclusive high rollers. To find out what critics are saying about Aaron Sorkin’s first turn at directing his own script, read out round-up of Molly’s Game reviews below. Read More »

Stephen King's It Reviews

(In our Spoiler Reviews, we take a deep dive into a new release and get to the heart of what makes it tick…and every story point is up for discussion. In this entry: Andy Muschietti’s It.)

How do you make a good Stephen King adaptation? That’s apparently a hard question to answer, since there are far more bad King film adaptations than good. More often than not, it seems filmmakers only latch onto the Stephen King brand – they figure if they make something that attempts to be scary and slap King’s name on it, the audience will come. That’s likely true, but the audience won’t come back again.

Last weekend, Andy Muschietti’s big screen adaptation of Stephen King’s It defied expectations – expectations that were already trending positively – and took in the largest opening weekend at the box office in horror movie history. This success isn’t just the result of the King name brand – if it were, we’d still be talking about the Dark Tower film adaptation instead of consigning it to the dust. The success of It is the result of supremely positive word-of-mouth. The trailers were edited well enough to drum up buzz, and then early reviews were overwhelmingly positive. The hype just kept on building.

And that’s because the movie is good. And more than that, it’s a good Stephen King adaptation.

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hollywood blames rotten tomatoes

Hollywood just had one of its worst summer seasons at the box office in 20 years. And rather than blame sequel fatigue, cinematic universe fatigue, or rapidly increasing ticket prices, executives are pointing their finger at one culprit: Rotten Tomatoes.

The movie review aggregation website has been the bane of the industry — and some film critics — for years, getting accused of reducing nuanced film reviews to a good-or-bad scale. And industry insiders say that its growing omniscience on Google and ticket sales websites like Fandango are steering audiences away from movies that get bad Rotten Tomatoes scores. But is Rotten Tomatoes really solely at fault?

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mother!

Note: There are some minor spoilers here, because it’s almost impossible to talk about this movie without spoiling something.

Don’t you hate it when noisome houseguests won’t take a hint? In mother!, the latest film from Darren Aronofsky, the prospect of unwanted company becomes immensely sinister and leads to much more chaotic results.

Aronofsky is a filmmaker who gravitates towards stories about the destructive side of obsession, and here he takes that theme to the extreme and then takes it even further. But the twist here is that the story isn’t being told from the point of view of the obsessive, destructive individual, but rather from someone in his orbit.

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i, tonya

In the 1990s, the story of figure skater Tonya Harding dominated the early days of the 24-hour news cycle. It was the testing ground for where news was headed, away from reporting and into gossip. It would be repeated tenfold by the O.J. Simpson trial, which came after the Harding incident was dying down. By then, the media was learning a valuable lesson: everyone loves a juicy story with a lot of dirt.

Craig Gillespie’s I, Tonya trades in gossip, but it also wants to get to the truth. The truth that many people probably don’t even know. For most people, Tonya Harding is little more than a punchline. I, Tonya wants to remind you she’s also a person. Read More »

Molly's Game Review - Jessica Chastain

Aaron Sorkin has had some trouble when it comes to his female characters. It’s not that Sorkin has never written a good female character; he has – C.J. Cregg on The West Wing immediately springs to mind. But more often than not, Sorkin has a tendency to reduce women to roles in which their biggest character trait is how well they stand beside powerful, smart men.

So it’s interesting that for his directorial debut Molly’s Game, Sorkin chose to helm a feature about a woman. Perhaps the writer was issuing a challenge to his critics – “I’ll show you once and for all that I can tell a story about a strong female character without resorting to mansplaining.”
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Professor Marston and the Wonder Women Review

It seems Wonder Woman has not one but two origin films in 2017. After breaking the box office and single-handled rescuing the DCEU with Patty JenkinsWonder Woman, the Amazon Warrior’s impetus is explored even further with Angela Robinson’s sweet, funny, and sexy Professor Marston and the Wonder Women.

Robinson’s film follows the people who helped create the most popular female superhero, and it’s not your typical creation tale. Instead, this is a polyamorous love story about the man and two women who fell in love with each other and eventually put their heads and kinks together to create Diana of Themyscira.  
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