Centrai Intelligence Review

Take one of the biggest movie stars in the world and team him up with one of the smallest, and it sounds like a gimmick in the making. On paper, just the sight of Dwayne Johnson standing alongside Kevin Hart will incite a smile. But do the two have what it takes to lead an action comedy that is funny, exciting and overall entertaining?

Thankfully, in Central Intelligence, from We’re the Millers director Rawson Thurber Marshall, the answer is mostly yes. However, this may only be because Johnson and Hart are such an irresistible duo that they make you forget that the action and plot surrounding them is hollow, dull and merely acts as an excuse for these two to engage with each other for laughs.

Continue reading our Central Intelligence review after the jump.

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Finding Dory review

Note: We originally ran Peter’s Finding Dory review on June 10. We’re re-running it now that the film is in theaters.

Finding Dory is an example of why we should never underestimate Pixar. Did we need a sequel to Finding Nemo? No. This film is unnecessary… yet somehow Finding Dory is a fun, rewarding emotional journey. Join me after the jump for a virtually spoiler-free reaction to Pixar’s latest film.

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Mother May I Sleep With Danger

I never saw the 1996 Tori Spelling TV movie but I get the gist: perfect guy turns out to be too good to be true, a male twist on Hand That Rocks the Cradle/Single White Female. Remake or not, James Franco writing and producing a Lifetime movie is a must-see part of his art oeuvre, but Mother, May I Sleep With Danger? is actually legitimately good when it could have coasted on camp.

Pearl (Emily Meade) is turned into a Nightwalker — a vampire in this movie’s mythology — in the first scene. Five years later, Leah (Leila George) is a college lit student performing in a feminist-twisted Macbeth on stage (Franco plays the director of the play). Pearl and Leah hit it off, as Pearl is a photographer who practically lives in the darkroom (get it???). So Leah has to come out to her mother (Spelling) and face society’s disapproval, including that of the boy she rejected, Bob (Nick Eversman).  Read More »

Finding Dory Reviews

Finding Dory doesn’t arrive in theaters until next weekend, but a slew of press and critics have already seen the movie as they participate in press junkets with the cast and crew. Today reviews started hitting the web, and for the most part, it seems the follow-up to Finding Nemo is a worthy successor to the original undersea adventure, though it treads much of the same water. For many, it seems to be just as good as the original, inspiring some tears to roll, but there are a few who weren’t as impressed.

Check out the Finding Dory reviews and early buzz after the jump. Read More »

Popstar Review

It may only be June, but it’s going to take some damn good comedy to top the fits of laughter brought upon by Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping. After The Lonely Island trio (Andy Samberg, Akiva Shaffer and Jorma Taccone) made a splash with their digital shorts on Saturday Night Live, it’s amazing it took them this long to put together a mockumentary following the rise and fall of a faux musician in the real world music industry. But for as long as it took, the hilarity delivered by Popstar makes it well worth the wait.

Read our full Popstar review after the jump. Read More »

X-Men Apocalypse Review

As the third film in the most recent trilogy in the X-Men franchise, it’s pretty bold to have a joke in X-Men: Apocalypse that mentions the third film in a trilogy is usually the worst. The line is meant to take a shot at the almost universally hated X-Men: The Last Stand, and while X-Men: Apocalypse is nowhere near as bad as Brett Ratner’s film from 2006, it’s not without some shortcomings of its own.

X-Men: Apocalypse has a simple, hollow story, spinning a wheel that also treads water. However, it also does a great job of bringing the young versions of familiar X-Men into this modified timeline and delivers some thoroughly entertaining action. In short, X-Men: Apocalypse feels like an extended episode of X-Men: The Animated Series, for better and worse.

Read our full X-Men Apocalypse review after the jump. Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

siff2016

This year will be my fourth attending the Seattle International Film Festival, and it remains an intense and overwhelming experience. Spanning 25 days, this year’s festival will include over 420 films representing 85 countries, making it the largest film festival in the United States. Here at /Film and on the /Filmcast, I’ll do my best to keep up with some of the highlights of the fest, and let you know what films might be worth checking out when they hit wide release.

After the jump, you can read a few of my mini-reviews of WeinerThe Last King, and Tickled. If you see me at the festival, feel free to say hi, and leave comments below if you think there are any films on SIFF’s full calendar that one should not miss this year.
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Love & Friendship

Note: With Love & Friendship in limited release this weekend, we’re re-running our review from the Sundance Film Festival.

 

Jane Austen may have a reputation as a romantic, but I’d argue that her real forte is as a humorist. She’s second to none when it comes to elegantly written, sharply observed comedies about the foibles of England’s upper classes, combining a wry, biting wit with a genuine sense of affection for the characters she’s created.

Naturally, this makes Austen’s work the perfect source of inspiration for Metropolitan and Last Days of Disco director Whit Stillman, who has brought her novella Lady Susan to life in the laugh-out-loud hilarious Love & FriendshipKate Beckinsale plays Lady Susan herself, a cunning widow out to secure her position in society via favorable marriage matches for herself and her daughter.  Read More »

The Lobster review

Note: With The Lobster in limited release this weekend, we’re re-running our review from the New York Film Festival.

Audiences have come to expect the bizarre from director Yorgos Lanthimos, who broke out in 2009 with the wonderful and unsettling Dogtooth, and The Lobster definitely doesn’t disappoint on that front. It’s set in a dystopia where single people are transformed into animals; the title refers to the animal that Colin Farrell‘s David has chosen to become if he can’t find a mate.

If weird were all The Lobster had going for it, though, it’d be little more than an experimental curiosity. What makes The Lobster must-see viewing is the film’s pitch-black sense of humor, its uncomfortably keen insights into real-life relationships, and even, in spite of everything else, its aching romanticism.  Read More »