Finding Dory Reviews

Finding Dory doesn’t arrive in theaters until next weekend, but a slew of press and critics have already seen the movie as they participate in press junkets with the cast and crew. Today reviews started hitting the web, and for the most part, it seems the follow-up to Finding Nemo is a worthy successor to the original undersea adventure, though it treads much of the same water. For many, it seems to be just as good as the original, inspiring some tears to roll, but there are a few who weren’t as impressed.

Check out the Finding Dory reviews and early buzz after the jump. Read More »

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Popstar Review

It may only be June, but it’s going to take some damn good comedy to top the fits of laughter brought upon by Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping. After The Lonely Island trio (Andy Samberg, Akiva Shaffer and Jorma Taccone) made a splash with their digital shorts on Saturday Night Live, it’s amazing it took them this long to put together a mockumentary following the rise and fall of a faux musician in the real world music industry. But for as long as it took, the hilarity delivered by Popstar makes it well worth the wait.

Read our full Popstar review after the jump. Read More »

X-Men Apocalypse Review

As the third film in the most recent trilogy in the X-Men franchise, it’s pretty bold to have a joke in X-Men: Apocalypse that mentions the third film in a trilogy is usually the worst. The line is meant to take a shot at the almost universally hated X-Men: The Last Stand, and while X-Men: Apocalypse is nowhere near as bad as Brett Ratner’s film from 2006, it’s not without some shortcomings of its own.

X-Men: Apocalypse has a simple, hollow story, spinning a wheel that also treads water. However, it also does a great job of bringing the young versions of familiar X-Men into this modified timeline and delivers some thoroughly entertaining action. In short, X-Men: Apocalypse feels like an extended episode of X-Men: The Animated Series, for better and worse.

Read our full X-Men Apocalypse review after the jump. Read More »

siff2016

This year will be my fourth attending the Seattle International Film Festival, and it remains an intense and overwhelming experience. Spanning 25 days, this year’s festival will include over 420 films representing 85 countries, making it the largest film festival in the United States. Here at /Film and on the /Filmcast, I’ll do my best to keep up with some of the highlights of the fest, and let you know what films might be worth checking out when they hit wide release.

After the jump, you can read a few of my mini-reviews of WeinerThe Last King, and Tickled. If you see me at the festival, feel free to say hi, and leave comments below if you think there are any films on SIFF’s full calendar that one should not miss this year.
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Love & Friendship

Note: With Love & Friendship in limited release this weekend, we’re re-running our review from the Sundance Film Festival.

 

Jane Austen may have a reputation as a romantic, but I’d argue that her real forte is as a humorist. She’s second to none when it comes to elegantly written, sharply observed comedies about the foibles of England’s upper classes, combining a wry, biting wit with a genuine sense of affection for the characters she’s created.

Naturally, this makes Austen’s work the perfect source of inspiration for Metropolitan and Last Days of Disco director Whit Stillman, who has brought her novella Lady Susan to life in the laugh-out-loud hilarious Love & FriendshipKate Beckinsale plays Lady Susan herself, a cunning widow out to secure her position in society via favorable marriage matches for herself and her daughter.  Read More »

The Lobster review

Note: With The Lobster in limited release this weekend, we’re re-running our review from the New York Film Festival.

Audiences have come to expect the bizarre from director Yorgos Lanthimos, who broke out in 2009 with the wonderful and unsettling Dogtooth, and The Lobster definitely doesn’t disappoint on that front. It’s set in a dystopia where single people are transformed into animals; the title refers to the animal that Colin Farrell‘s David has chosen to become if he can’t find a mate.

If weird were all The Lobster had going for it, though, it’d be little more than an experimental curiosity. What makes The Lobster must-see viewing is the film’s pitch-black sense of humor, its uncomfortably keen insights into real-life relationships, and even, in spite of everything else, its aching romanticism.  Read More »

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Captain America Civil War Review

After the collateral damage caused by the previous efforts of the Avengers proves to be too much for the world’s governments, the United Nations comes together to introduce the Sokovia Accords, a resolution that will turn the superheroes into a task force supervised and directed by the UN itself. But not all our heroes are ready to blindly follow the commands of an organization that could just as easily have an agenda like S.H.I.E.L.D. (or Hydra) before it, and that’s what leads to the titular superhero conflict in Captain America: Civil War.

The result is a sharp, astounding, action-packed summer blockbuster that’s the kind of superhero movie you’ve been waiting to see your whole life. This is a comic book film where the action is just as harrowing as it is entertaining due to the care and respect that we’ve come to have for these superheroes after spending a total of 11 films (not counting Guardians of the Galaxy) with them in the Marvel cinematic universe. Directors Anthony & Joe Russo have pulled together a movie that brings as much hard-hitting drama to the table as much as it does astounding action. It’s the perfect model for what serial comic book movies can be.

Keep reading our Captain America Civil War review after the jump. Read More »

Elvis and Nixon review 1

At first glance, the 1970 picture of Elvis Presley and Richard Nixon shaking hands in the Oval Office looks flat-out bizarre. The flamboyantly attired musician makes for a striking contrast to the staid politician, and it’s a little jarring to realize that not only did these two people once inhabit the same universe, they actually crossed paths once. Somehow, the story behind that picture is even stranger: To Elvis, at least, this was no mere photo up but a meeting to discuss his swearing-in as an undercover federal agent-at-large for the Bureau of Narcotics.

Liza Johnson‘s Elvis & Nixon is about that how that meeting came to be and what happened when these two larger-than-life figures finally collided, with Michael Shannon as the King and Kevin Spacey as Tricky Dick. But it’s less about the vast differences between this two men than the one thing, even more than a shared distaste for the counterculture of the times, that truly bound them together: the strangeness of fame.  Read More »

Dean review

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before: a successful young(ish) creative type hits the film festival circuit with a semi-autobiographical dramedy about a somewhat less successful young(ish) creative type who struggles to pull his life together, grow up, and move on. That’s the very familiar premise of comedian Demetri Martin‘s directorial debut Dean, which premiered this week at the Tribeca Film Festival. Fortunately, Dean‘s got a few fresher tricks up its sleeve that justify retracing this very familiar pattern.

One is that Dean is less about the precious ennui that all young(ish) creative types seem to suffer from in indie dramedies, than it is about the strange and complicated and even ugly process of grief. Another is a gently played subplot about Dean’s father (played by Kevin Kline). And the third and perhaps most important are the many wry cartoons Martin uses to emphasize and comment on Dean’s mental and emotional state.  Read More »