Professor Marston and the Wonder Women

Professor Marston and the Wonder Women reveals the rather surprising story of the creator of Wonder Woman, Dr. William Moulton Marston, and the unconventional relationship he had with two women. It’s a charming, thoughtful film that goes places you might not expect it to, and a new clip offers a brief glimpse of the film’s themes. Watch the Professor Marston and the Wonder Women clip below.

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i, tonya

Watch your kneecaps – I, Tonya is going for the gold. I’m talking about Oscar gold, that is, as the official release date for Craig Gillespie‘s satirical look at the fallen figure skater’s life is proof-positive that the filmmakers are hoping for some award season love. See the details of the I, Tonya release date below.

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the shape of water red band trailer

Another Toronto International Film Festival has been resigned to the dust, and it is time for us to look back on it and remember all the great (and not so great) films we witnessed there.

Truth be told, this year’s fest was slightly less exciting than last – the films were good, and some were even fantastic, but overall they did not pack as much of a punch as I’d been hoping. Still, it’s hard to deny the thrill one gets from attending TIFF; day after day, you spend hours upon hours watching films with audiences who are genuinely excited to be there, unlike seeing a film at your local multiplex, where the crowd could care less. If you’re covering TIFF as press, you rise at dawn, make your way down to the Scotiabank Theatre and spend almost the entire day there. It can be exhausting and draining, but it’s also wonderful.

For the sake of completion, I’ve compiled links to all the /Film reviews (written by me and Marshall Shaffer) out of this year’s TIFF, as well as a blurb or two for films that did not receive a full review. Here is every movie we saw at TIFF 2017.

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Breathe trailer 2

Andy Serkis is best known for his work in front of the camera, imbuing visual effects-driven characters like Gollum and Caesar with weight and inner life using performance capture technology. But he has some experience behind the camera as well, having directed the second unit of all three of Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit films.

Now the actor is making his official directorial debut with Breathe, an inspiring true story starring Andrew Garfield (The Amazing Spider-Man) and Claire Foy (The Crown) as a couple who must overcome incredible odds just to regain the semblance of a normal life together after one of them contracts polio. The movie’s second trailer has arrived, so check it out below and see what you think about Serkis’s potential as a director.
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Battle of the Sexes Clips

Awards season is just around the corner, and soon the movies that will be vying for Academy Awards, Golden Globes and more will begin hitting theaters, trying to drum up acclaim and praise. One of the earlier films out of the gate that already has awards buzz from its debut on the festival circuit recently is a real life sports drama starring Steve Carell and Emma Stone.

Battle of the Sexes tells the story of the highly publicized tennis match between Billie Jean King (Emma Stone) and Bobby Riggs (Steve Carell) in 1973, a tennis match that pitted man versus woman and made waves for equality between the sexes. You can get a better glimpse at the true story in a batch of new footage that has arrived in a couple TV spots, clips and a featurette.

Watch the Battle of the Sexes clips and more footage below. Read More »

Chappaquiddick review

“I could stand in the middle of Fifth Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn’t lose any voters,” declared then-candidate Donald Trump in the middle of the 2016 Republican primaries. Perhaps he was well acquainted with the chapter in the life of Ted Kennedy, the legendary “lion of the Senate,” chronicled in John Curran’s Chappaquiddick – and how it ultimately failed to move the needle among his constituents. Despite lies, misrepresentations and cover-ups, Kennedy’s involvement in the death of a political aide now serves as little more than a footnote on his Wikipedia page.

Curran, with stone-faced intent and brutal focus, makes the case that such an incident cannot help but illuminate the true character of a man. People may not need to reconcile Kennedy’s deficient response to a tragedy of his own creation with his legacy of championing liberal causes. But Chappaquiddick provides a sobering, non-ideological reminder that if such deeds do not become a part of a public figure’s narrative, then a frightening impunity for elected officials can reign.

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all the money in the world trailer

Ridley Scott has been hard at work, with two high-profile films released this year. While Alien: Covenant met with mixed reactions from fans of the beloved sci-fi franchise that he begat, All the Money in the World arrives with virtually no expectations from movie goers.

It’s a wonder that this film wasn’t on our radar sooner. Starring award-winning actors like Kevin Spacey, Michelle Williams, and Mark Wahlberg, and based on the real-life kidnapping of billionaire J. Paul Getty’s grandson, it’s the type of buzzy fare that will immediately get audience attention, if not awards attention. That’s likely what the recently released trailer is aiming for.

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Breathe Review

As an innovator in the field of motion capture technology, Andy Serkis might possess a greater understanding of the nuances and capabilities of the human face than anyone working in cinema. The knowledge shows early on in Breathe, Serkis’ directorial debut, as Andrew Garfield’s protagonist Robin Cavendish begins to succumb to paralysis from polio. Serkis shoots his affliction primarily in extreme close-up, a camera length at which Garfield is more than capable at conveying nuance. With just the slightest shift of his glance or the quiver of his lip, Garfield conveys as much as his grandest gestures in other films.

Unsurprisingly, Garfield nails the immediate micro-level specificity necessitated by portraying someone with such a debilitating condition. He’s robbed of so many key acting tools: the scope to take in an entire scene, the ability to react in full, the emphasis in his extremities. Yet within this tightly proscribed frame, Garfield still manages the full expressive capabilities for which has garnered great acclaim. In Breathe, he captures that same moving range from elation to depression.

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Only the Brave Trailer

Right now, wildfires are tearing through the Western half of the United States, torching hundreds of thousands of acres of land in Montana, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, California and Utah. There have been more than 24,000 firefighters battling 137 blazes. These men and women are the best of the best, and the story of some of them from Arizona will be told on the big screen this fall.

Only the Brave will tell the story of the Granite Mountain Hot Shots, the team that took on a wildfire in Yarnell, Arizona that would go on to become the deadliest U.S. wildfire since the 1991 East Bay Hills fire, and the deadliest incident of any kind for United States firefighters since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. A new Only the Brave trailer shows how Josh Brolin, James Badge Dale, Jeff Bridges and Miles Teller face that fire in what appears to be a no-win scenario. Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

amc black lives matter series

Black Lives Matter is not going away. And as more cases of police brutality are unveiled each day, Hollywood begins to take more notice.

Television was the first to address the ongoing movement calling for less police violence targeting African Americans, with episodes of ScandalBlack-ish, and Dear White People setting aside their sleek or comedic facades to candidly tackle the topic head-on. And now AMC is developing a prestige drama about the topic, based on Washington Post journalist Wesley Lowery’s nonfiction book They Can’t Kill Us All: Ferguson, Baltimore, and a New Era in America’s Racial Justice

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