The Equalizer 2 director

Denzel Washington is starring in the first sequel of his career with The Equalizer 2. Washington was doing just great without a franchise, but he found a potentially good one in Sony’s remake of the 1980s CBS television show. Months before The Equalizer came out, the studio got the ball rolling on a follow-up film, tapping the original film’s screenwriter Richard Wenk to pen the sequel. Initially, it wasn’t known if director Antoine Fuqua (The Magnificent Seven) would come back to the director’s chair, but Fuqua is indeed returning for The Equalizer 2.

Below, learn more about The Equalizer 2 director.

Read More »

.

Please Recommend /Film on Facebook

Incorporated trailer

Last year we told you that longtime BFFs Matt Damon and Ben Affleck would be teaming up again on a futuristic spy thriller series called Incorporated for Syfy. The first Incorporated trailer has hit the web, and you can get your first look at the upcoming Damon/Affleck-produced Syfy series after the jump.
Read More »

operation avalanche interview

Operation Avalanche is one of the most pleasant surprises of 2016. What begins as a wickedly funny conspiracy theory comedy about a team of CIA agents who fake the moon landing in 1969 slowly shifts into a thrilling, paranoia-fueled thriller, shot and edited to look like a long-lost documentary secretly assembled by the man in charge of the project. The making of the film is just as fascinating as the final product: co-writer/director/star Matt Johnson and producer Matthew Miller not only had to create a convincing ’60 setting on a small budget, they had to do it without much help from anyone who could have made it easy. This is the kind of production that involved everyone literally sneaking into NASA as part of a fake tour group to shoot chunks of the movie. Really.

I sat down with Johnson and Miller and they spilled the nitty-gritty details. What’s it like to bump heads with Stanley Kubrick’s estate? How to film a low-budget car chase inspired by Children of Men? How, exactly, do you define “illegal” when it comes to guerrilla filmmaking? They were more than happy to share.

Read More »

‘L.A. Confidential’ Director Curtis Hanson Dead at 71

curtis hanson dead

Academy Award winning filmmaker Curtis Hanson, whose credits include masterpieces like L.A. Confidential, hits like 8 Mile, and under-seen gems like Wonder Boys, passed away yesterday from natural causes in his Los Angeles home. He was 71 years old.

Read More »

The Whole Truth trailer

Keanu Reeves has been killing it lately in a variety of offbeat projects, from John Wick to The Neon Demon. He even acquitted himself quite nicely in The Bad Batch, which is more than we can say for either of that film’s actual leads. Now this fall he’ll return to more straightforwardly dramatic fare with The Whole Truth, the new legal thriller from Frozen River director Courtney Hunt.

Written by Nicholas Kazan, The Whole Truth centers on a shocking murder trial. A teenage boy (Gabriel Basso) has been charged with murdering his father (Jim Belushi), and his mother (Renée Zellweger) hires defense attorney Richard Ramsay (Reeves) to defend her. The case seems straightforward at first. The boy has confessed to the crime, and all physical evidence seems to back him up. But as the trial moves forward, Richard’s colleague (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) begins to suspect that not all is as it appears. Watch The Whole Truth trailer below.  Read More »

scarface remake

It’s hard to get too worked up about Antoine Fuqua remaking Scarface. After all, Brian DePalma’s 1983 crime classic is a remake of Howard Hawks’ 1932 crime classic and, aside from the plot revolving around the rise and fall of a dangerous criminal, they couldn’t be more different from one another. Honestly, if someone wants to make a new Scarface ever 30 years or so to reflect the changing landscape of crime in America, I’d say just go for it. As long as each new filmmaker brings something new to the template, why not?

And from the sound of things, Fuqua’s film will align itself with what troubles us in 2016, using elements from the real world to explain the motivation of a new drug empire.

Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

elle trailer

Paul Verhoeven has a unique talent for getting a rise out of audiences. RoboCop is a goofy action movie…that is also about the inner rot eating away at American culture. Starship Troopers is a wild science fiction action movie…that is also a vicious parody of fascism and military propaganda. Basic Instinct is a sexy psychological thriller…that leaves you feeling disgusted with yourself on just about every level. And Showgirls is…well, it’s Showgirls.

Excluding 2012’s crowdsourced experiment Tricked, Elle is Verhoeven’s first feature film since 2006’s exceptional World War II drama Black Book and it certainly looks like he’s up to his old tricks. Here’s a thriller that looks standard on the outside, but promises all kinds of provocative nastiness on the inside. The trailer and the talent involved is more than enough to grab my interest, but I’ll be honest: I’m dreading this movie as much as I’m looking forward to seeing it.

Watch the Elle trailer after the jump.

Read More »

Jaws Book Cover - Jaws Movie Compared to the Book

Jaws is one of the most well known movies of all time, right down to the iconic theme music composed by John Williams. However, there are likely plenty among general audiences out there who don’t know that the 1975 thriller directed by Steven Spielberg was based on a book by Peter Benchley. The book is also called Jaws, but there are quite a few differences between the book and what ended up on the big screen.

See the Jaws movie compared to the book after the jump. Read More »

Mr. Robot Python Part 1 Recap

“You are standing in an open field west of a white house, with a boarded front door. There is a small mailbox here.”

So begins one of the most important, influential video games ever made. Infocom’s Zork was birthed in an MIT lab in the late 1970s. It was released to the public as a series of text-based adventure games in the early ’80s, and went on to shape much of the structure present in modern adventure and exploration games. Its enigmatic opening remains, perhaps, the greatest beginning to a video game ever made. Poor grammar aside, Zork’s opening lines invite the player into a new universe built almost entirely by the player’s own imagination. Where modern games max out on polygons and rendering detail and atmospheric effects to present a cinematic vision for gamers, Zork stands as a testament to the power of simple text on a screen, as well as to the underlying structures that make games work. Give the play a place to explore; set boundaries; create obstacles; leverage frustration. As you progress and fail and progress some more in search of a path to the end, the biggest question the game leave you with is, “what am I not seeing?”

It’s fitting that Elliot asks himself the same thing near the end of “Python Part 1,” the penultimate episode of Mr. Robot’s similarly enigmatic, confounding, sometimes frustrating second season. Elliot—and not just Elliot—is searching through a dark, unknowable space, the boundaries of which keep expanding and expanding as the search carries on. At some point there might be an end, or an escape, or even just a door to some better place of the imagination. Our “hero” is caught in the second stages of an adventure. He’s left the field, entered the house, found the door to a mysterious cellar, venture down and discovered the Great Underground Empire.

But what are we not seeing?  Read More »