Lemon trailer

Brett Gelman can simultaneously make one laugh as they want to cringe and shrivel up into a ball. He does so often on Netflix’s Love, but he’s brought that particularly great skillset to other comedies over the years. Gelman recently co-wrote and starred in a film which looks like it’ll have some good uneasy laughs, Lemon, which is co-written and directed by Janicza Bravo.

Below, watch the Lemon trailer.

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Another WolfCop Trailer

Lowell Dean‘s 2014 Canadian horror comedy WolfCop, which focused on an alcoholic police officer who turns into a werewolf, apparently performed well enough to warrant a sequel. In keeping with the movie’s tongue-in-cheek approach to…well, just about everything, the second film in the series is called Another WolfCop, and its trailer and poster highlight the fact that it’s providing more of what fans wanted from the first movie.
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Ben Pearson’s Top 10 Movies of 2017 So Far

Ben Pearson's Top 10 Movies of 2017 So Far

(With 2017 halfway over, the /Film staff will be spending this week compiling lists of the best movies they’ve seen this year. In order to be eligible for the list, a film they’ve seen simply has to have a 2017 release date, even if they saw it early at a festival or early screening. First up: here are Ben Pearson’s top 10 movies of 2017 so far.)

I have not spent nearly enough time this year seeking out the types of smaller movies I tend to love, and frankly, I’m a little embarrassed that three superhero movies made the cut on my list of favorites so far. But damn it, they’re really good superhero movies, and as ashamed as I am that my list isn’t as “cool” as it might be if I’d spent more time at my local arthouse theater, these are the movies I’ve seen so far in 2017 that spoke to me the most in one way or another. The good news is that I’m guessing only a couple of these will end up on my favorite movies of the year list when December rolls around, so at least you’ll be getting some variation if you compare that list with this one. Enough preamble: join me in counting down my favorite movies of the year so far as we hit the halfway point of 2017.

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Ingrid Goes West trailer

Here’s the second trailer for Ingrid Goes West, a satire of Instagram culture and obsession that marks the directorial debut of filmmaker Matt Spicer. Aubrey Plaza (Parks and Recreation) plays Ingrid, a pathetic stalker who develops an obsession of an Insta-celeb named Taylor (Elizabeth Olsen). When Ingrid heads across the country to ingratiate herself into Taylor’s life, things seem to go well before they quickly go off the rails.
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The Incredible Jessica James Trailer

You might know Jessica Williams from her time as a correspondent on The Daily Show when Jon Stewart was still hosting the show. However, her indie romantic comedy that debuted at Sundance earlier this year has started turning some heads. Hopefully, she’ll become a movie star.

The Incredible Jessica James finds Jones playing an aspiring playwright in New York City. She’s confident, blunt, charming and hilarious, but she’s also recovering form a big break-up and finds her life not entirely under control. That makes a new relationship and her uncertainty about her career that much more difficult to deal with. We’ve all been there before.

Watch The Incredible Jessica James trailer below. Read More »

The Little Hours review

The Little Hours is based on one of the tales found in The Decameron, a collection of 14th century novellas from Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio. But even if, like me, you’d never heard of that author before (let alone read his work), all you really need to know about this film is that it features a cast of hilarious people doing filthy, hysterical things. The trailer prominently features a quote from the Catholic League that refers to the movie as “pure trash” – but there’s an important distinction that needs to be made there. It may be trashy, but it’s definitely not trash. The Little Hours is one of the funniest films of 2017. Read More »

Desolation review

A mysterious man with reflective glasses stalks a trio of isolated campers in Desolation, the feature directorial debut of filmmaker Sam Patton. When Abby (Jaimi Paige) loses her husband to sickness, she takes her 13-year-old son Sam (Toby Nichols) and her best friend Jenn (Alyshia Ochse) on a multi-day hiking trip to spread her husband’s ashes at the top of a mountain. But during the trip, the group slowly realizes they’re being followed by a silent man with a beard, hood, and sunglasses. Our protagonists are worried, and it turns out their fears are justified: The Hiker (Claude Duhamel) is a killer, and they’re all alone in the woods with him.
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Never Here review

Miranda (Mireille Enos) is an installation artist interested in exploring the concept of identity. One of her exhibits is based on the time she found a man’s phone, went through it to learn the places he normally visited, and then trekked to those places to surreptitiously take photos of him, which she put on display in a gallery. But when she poses as the key witness in a police investigation of a random assault that occurred just outside her apartment window, Miranda is struck with inspiration for her latest idea, a twisted, voyeuristic documentation of the man she believes committed the crime.

It’s fitting that Miranda’s last name is “Fall,” since the character slowly descends into her own delusional interpretation of the world over the course of Camille Thoman’s unsettling directorial debut, Never Here. Read More »

The Bachelors review

The majority of movies at film festivals don’t release trailers beforehand, so we often choose which films to see based on the filmmakers involved, the cast, and a brief description. Approaching a movie fresh is a hugely different experience than seeing one that’s strategically unveiled three trailers and a barrage of TV spots, and because so much about them is unknown, I find myself watching festival films with a different level of anticipation. Not only am I hoping the film turns out to be good (as I do with every movie I see), but in the back of my mind, I’m secretly hoping to see something revelatory. Something that moves me in a way that a huge studio project might not be able to. Something with an awards-worthy performance, or perhaps something that heralds the arrival of an exciting new voice in the world of independent film.

Most of the time, festival films don’t live up to those expectations. Sometimes, you just get a movie that’s fine, a middle-of-the-road piece of work that neither moves you nor insults your intelligence. Something competently made with respectable actors and a handful of pleasant moments, but you won’t ever give it a second thought. That may sound harsh or dismissive, but think about it: if you watch a lot of movies, doesn’t that accurately describe a large percentage of them? Such is the case with The Bachelors, Kurt Voelker’s exploration of grief, loneliness, and despair through the eyes of two men who have lost the most important woman in their lives. Read More »

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Midnighters trailer

This year’s Los Angeles Film Festival has kicked off in Culver City and they’re hosting the world premiere of Midnighters, a thriller from long-time TV director Julius Ramsay. He’s been at the helm of Alias, Battlestar Galactica, and 23 episodes of The Walking Dead, but he’s making his feature debut with this suspenseful story about a couple that accidentally kills someone and a cover-up that only makes things worse. Check out the first Midnighters trailer below.
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