Skyfall - Bond and Silava

While imperfect, the Bechdel Test has proven a handy tool for surveying the general shape for women in cinema. It’s been surprising and disappointing to see how few titles pass the three criteria, that a film have 1) more than two female characters, 2) who talk to each other, 3) about something other than a man.

But women aren’t the only underrepresented group in Hollywood, and GLAAD has devised an analogue for LGBT characters called the Russo Test, named after The Celluloid Closet author Vito Russo. The organization applied the test to the 101 films released by major studios in 2012, and have now published their findings in their first-ever Studio Responsibility Index. Hit the jump to read the results.

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Blue Is the Warmest Color

Abdellatif Kechiche‘s Blue Is the Warmest Color drew raves upon raves at Cannes this year, for its tender, intimate portrayal of two young women (Adèle Exarchopoulos and Léa Seydoux) falling in love. But it also raised some eyebrows thanks to its graphic sex scenes.

It’s no surprise, then, that the MPAA has stamped the drama with an NC-17 for its U.S. release. But rather than trim the movie for an R or release it without a rating at all, American distributor Sundance Selects will put Blue Is the Warmest Color in theaters with the restrictive rating intact. Hit the jump to find out why, and to get a peek at the first international trailer.

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Behind the Candelabra

Steven Soderbergh‘s retirement has turned out to be more of a transition. While he’s done with theatrical features for now, he’s as active as ever on the small screen. Just last week, he was talking up his plans to adapt John Barth’s The Sot-Weed Factor into a 12-hour miniseries.

Perfectly positioned to mark that switch from the big screen to the small one is Behind the Candelabra, an HBO film about the rather bizarre romance between the famed pianist (played with flirty, flamboyant charm by Michael Douglas) and his much younger lover Scott Thorson (a wide-eyed Matt Damon). The first full-length trailer has finally hit the web, and you can check it out after the jump.

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There may not be a whole lot to watch on TV right now, but there’s plenty to watch in TV Bits. After the jump:

  • Neil Marshall will direct Michael Bay‘s pirate drama Black Sails
  • John Boyd and Dileep Rao join Kiefer Sutherland in Touch
  • The Walking Dead will kill off another series regular in Season 3
  • Charlie Sheen‘s Anger Management gets 90 more eps. Sigh
  • Watch Showtime’s animated prequel mini-web-series for Dexter
  • NBC’s The New Normal hits the web a couple weeks early
  • Fox unveils more teasers for Fringe‘s fifth and final season
  • American Horror Story spills plot details; watch more teasers

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For all the zillions of movies we get about the deliriously happy early days of a romance, there are precious few about what happens when the honeymoon period wears off. And it’s a shame, because while it’s harder to turn something that’s become part of the everyday grind into a crowd-pleasing holiday-themed romcom directed by Garry Marshall, the truth is that there’s a ton of rich, textured material to be mined from older relationships.

One film that goes there is Ira SachsKeep the Lights On, an intimate drama about a decade-long relationship between documentary filmmaker Erik (Thure Lindhardt) and and lawyer Paul (Zachary Booth). The life they’ve built together is threatened when Paul’s drug addiction — an issue even in the early days — continues to worsen. Watch the trailer after the jump.

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Last week, DC Comics co-publisher Dan DiDio made headlines when he revealed that a character previously established as straight would be coming out as gay in the rebooted New 52 universe. Comic book fans immediately began speculating as to the identity of the newly gay character, and now we have our answer. In a new interview, Earth 2 writer James Robinson has revealed that the newly homosexual character in question is Alan Scott, the first Green Lantern. More details after the jump.

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As mainstream politics and pop culture become increasingly gay friendly, DC Comics is jumping on the pro-LGBT bandwagon with a new gay character. Or rather, an old character who’s newly gay.

During this weekend’s Kapow! comic convention, DC co-publisher Dan DiDio announced that the publisher plans to bring out of the closet a character who has previously been established as straight, with the hopes of making said character “one of our most prominent gay characters.” Seeing as LGBT characters in the DC canon are still fairly few and far in between, that shouldn’t be too difficult, but it’s still progress. Read more after the jump.

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Sometime around 2007, Juno BFFs Ellen Page and Olivia Thirlby signed themselves up to reunite as teenage lesbian werewolves on Bradley Rust Gray‘s Jack & Diane. Funding fell through, however, and after years of delays, both actresses quietly dropped out of the project. Page was then replaced by Alison Pill, who in turn was replaced by Juno Temple, while Thirlby’s part was recast with Riley Keough.

This year, Gray’s completed Jack & Diane finally made its debut at the Tribeca Film Festival. And while much about the film is tough to understand, what’s clear is that Page and Thirlby have dodged a bullet by leaving the project early on.

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