How Lightsabers Were Created

There is plenty of memorabilia out there inspired by the movies that we love. But there’s nothing better than getting your hands on a genuine prop from your favorite motion picture. The only problem is you usually have to empty out your bank account to get something like that into your hands. Now a couple props are up for auction that may be worth selling your house for.

The lightsaber that Luke Skywalker inherited from his father in Star Wars: A New Hope only to end up in the hands of Rey in Star Wars: The Force Awakens is now up for auction. But for you Star Wars fans who may not have enough money to pick up the coveted, elegant weapon, there’s a certain prop from the saga spoof Spaceballs that might be a little more easy on your wallet.

Find out more about the Spaceballs prop and Star Wars lightsaber auction. Read More »

Tour De Pharmacy trailer

James Marsden looks right at home as an on-air sports journalist in the 1980s. With the big framed glasses and colourful attire, the actor, who typically shines in comedies, is covering the 1982 Tour De Pharmacy. A dangerous year in cycling, with everybody doping. In HBO’s new sports mockumentary, Andy SambergJohn CenaOrlando Bloom, and a long list of other familiar faces play athletes competing in the 1982 race – which looks every bit as ridiculous and as fun as 7 Days in Hell.

Below, watch the Tour De Pharmacy trailer.

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hot fuzz sequel

The closest Edgar Wright has come to making a sequel is his Three Flavours Cornetto Trilogy, the unofficial series of genre films loosely tied together by Simon Pegg and Nick Frost (and ice cream). But would he consider making a sequel to one of his most popular films?

Maybe, Wright answers. And only one of his films really lends itself to a sequel: the second in the Cornetto Trilogy, the buddy cop comedy Hot Fuzz.

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Ghostbusters Reboot Trailer

Paul Feig’s Ghostbusters: Answer the Call didn’t perform quite as well as the folks at Sony would have liked last year, leading original Ghostbuster Dan Aykroyd to call Feig out in a big way a few days ago and cast doubt on a sequel. But original Ghostbusters director and Aykroyd’s Ghost House Pictures partner Ivan Reitman apparently doesn’t have the same doom and gloom outlook, because in a new interview, he discusses his idea for the future of Ghostbusters.
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Futurama Leaving Netflix

Fans of Futurama who have enjoyed watching the animated series over the years on Netflix will be disappointed to hear that the show is leaving the streaming service next month. When June is over, nearly all of Futurama will be removed from Netflix’s library.

Here’s why Futurama is leaving Netflix next month. Read More »

The Hero review

The Hero centers on an aging movie star who’s best remembered for his performance in a beloved western forty years earlier. It’s a vehicle written specifically for actor Sam Elliott, who, of course, has his own storied history in that genre and has embraced that vibe as a key part of his acting persona, even in films as divergent as Ghost Rider and The Big Lebowski. While The Hero doesn’t offer any particularly insightful observations about what it means to get older in Hollywood, it’s still a pleasure to watch Elliott – a perennial ensemble player since his made-for-TV movie heyday of the ’80s and ’90s – do terrific work as the clear lead of a film that lasers in on his sensibilities as a performer.

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The Pentagon Likes War Machine

War Machine was nearly destined to become another forgotten film on the dust pile of Netflix’s original movies. On paper it doesn’t seem like that would be the case: War Machine was a $60 million Brad Pitt-starring satirical war movie based on a best-selling book and directed by a fairly established director, David Michôd (Animal Kingdom, The Rover). But middling reviews and the Netflix marketing machine had caused the film to disappear into the back of the “Netflix Originals” category — for everyone except for the Pentagon.

The film has picked up an unexpected fanbase among the federal employees at the Pentagon, where it has become the hot topic of the moment among an audience who you would expect to hate the anti-Afghanistan War satire.

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Melissa McCarthy - Margie Claus

Making a holiday movie is rite of passage for on-screen talents in Hollywood. Eventually, almost every actor or actress makes an attempt at starring in a holiday movie because it’s one of those things that’s guaranteed to bring in residual checks every years when networks air them around Thanksgiving and Christmas. That time has come for Melissa McCarthy.

The breakout supporting star of Bridesmaids has turned into quite the leading lady as one of the most talented and popular female comedy stars on the scene right now. Now, Melissa McCarthy will take her star power to Christmas with a holiday musical comedy called Margie ClausRead More »

Landline trailer

Director Gillian Robespierre’s Obvious Child was such a pleasant surprise for a lot of people back in 2014 that news she was reuniting with star Jenny Slate for a new movie called Landline was greeted with cheers. Amazon Studios picked up the film and has debuted the first trailer for the dramedy, which is set in 1995 and focuses on a dysfunctional family with parents played by John Turturro and Edie Falco. But even with a cast made up of industry vets, it sounds like the film’s largely unknown youngest cast member may be the one who steals the movie.
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Dragnet vs The Untouchables

(Welcome to Seeing Double, a series where two strangely similar films released around the same time are put head-to-head. This week: 1987’s Dragnet and 1987’s The Untouchables.)

Hollywood is a land of mystery. Who killed the Black Dahlia? Was Marisa Tomei the real winner of 1993’s Best Supporting Actress Oscar? Why is Jai Courtney still a thing?

One of the less salacious and controversial mysteries to come out of Hollywood though involves the occasional appearance of “movie doubles” – films from rival studios with highly similar plots/subjects that are released in close proximity to each other. Think Volcano and Dante’s Peak or Deep Impact and Armageddon. There’s little upside to both studios sticking to their guns and moving forward with the production as history shows that more often than not one of the pair falls by the wayside at the box-office, so why even head into production on a film you know another studio has already begun? Are original ideas that hard to come by in Hollywood? (This is a rhetorical question.)

This month is the 30th anniversary of both Dragnet and The Untouchables, and while at first glance they might not seem like another pair of duplicates, I’d argue to the contrary. Both films are big screen adaptations of popular ’50s/’60s television cop shows that at some point starred Harry Morgan, both feature lead actors who were known entities but still a year or three away from their biggest success, and they were released just three weeks apart in June of 1987. The films take wildly opposing approaches to the material itself, and their fates both at the box-office and in the critical eye may have differed because of it.

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