dangerous men clip

I’ve seen Dangerous Men twice now and it’s just as brain-breaking as the trailer implies. John Rad‘s mesmerizing B-movie cocktail of sex, violence, and revenge brought the house down at this year’s Fantastic Fest and it will soon start collapsing movie theater roofs all over the nation (in a purely metaphorical manner, of course). There are a ton of great “bad” movies out there, but this film, shot over 26 years by a bootstrapping Iranian immigrant, is top-notch, grade-A insanity. There has never been anything else quite like it – it has no right to exist or to be seen in any format beyond a crummy VHS tape passed along from one curious set of hands to another. But here it is.

We’re pleased to present an exclusive new clip from Dangerous Men, which is being re-released by Drafthouse Films, a company that has a habit of rescuing odd and unusual films from oblivion. These 60 seconds represent only a tiny fraction of the movie’s pleasures. Know that the fight scene depicted in the video below isn’t even the most bizarre fight scene in the movie. There’s a lot more where this came from.

Prepare to have your psyche annihilated by the new Dangerous Men clip after the jump.

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Hello My Name is Doris trailer

Hello, My Name is Doris premiered at this year’s South by Southwest. The film, co-written and directed by Michael Showalter (Wet Hot American Summer), was acquired by Roadside Attractions after its premiere for the price of $1.75 million, the biggest purchase made at the festival this year. The comedy, starring Sally Field (Lincoln), also won the audience award for headliners. Watch the Hello, My Name is Doris trailer after the jump.

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nightmare before christmas halloween

It’s one of the greatest cinematic controversies of all time. Since international law allows you to only watch The Nightmare Before Christmas once per year, fans of the 1993 stop-motion animated musical have long debated the more appropriate time to view the film. Is it a weird and creepy Christmas movie, or a Halloween movie with with a peppermint-flavored candy shell? It only took 22 years, but someone finally decided to ask director Henry Selick, who gave the definitive answer: it’s an October movie.

Find Selick’s reasoning for the Nightmare Before Christmas Halloween movie label after the jump.

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The 12 Best Films at Fantastic Fest 2015

Fantastic Fest 2015

This year marked my first time attending the the Austin-based Fantastic Fest, and I’m glad I went. How good is the festival? Well, the first film I saw, which is no. 1 on this list, blew my socks off. The movies I saw after that grand introduction, for the most part, didn’t make for a downhill slope. After the jump, read about the 12 best films at Fantastic Fest 2015.

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Steve Jobs

Were you to go into Steve Jobs having no idea who Steve Jobs was, Steve Jobs wouldn’t really tell you. The character (played by Michael Fassbender) explains to a pissed-off Steve Wozniak (Seth Rogen) at one point that he “play[s] the orchestra” like a symphony conductor — but as Wozniak points out, it’s one of those sentences that sounds cool but doesn’t really mean anything in concrete terms.

For most biopics, this would be a failing, but for a Steve Jobs biopic in 2015, it’s an asset. We don’t need a movie to tell us who Steve Jobs is as a tech guru. I’m currently typing this review on my Apple keyboard, which is linked to my MacBook Air, with my iPhone 6 by my side; I know exactly who Steve Jobs, Apple CEO, is. Steve Jobs feels a revelation because it exposes Steve Jobs, the man.  Read More »

green room release date

Jeremy Saulnier‘s Green Room is the cinematic equivalent of getting your face bashed in. In a good way, of course. This take-no-prisoners thriller has been making the festival rounds throughout 2015, sucker-punching unsuspecting audiences from Cannes to Toronto. It’s a mad and brilliant movie… and it’s already been picked up by A24, who have officially given this gruesome instant-gem a release date.

For details on the Green Room release date, hit the jump!

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Son of Saul Review

Son of Saul is a significant achievement made all the more astonishing by the fact that it is the director’s debut feature. This intimate story from within the Holocaust avoids World War II movie cliches, turning away from convention to embrace an unflinching vision of one man’s quest for redemption in the inferno of Auschwitz.

The phrase “Holocaust movie” may inspire an instinct to avoid rather than rush towards a film; in this case please don’t give in. Son of Saul approaches its subject without gingerness or caution, but this film’s spirit never falls into exploitation. More important, focusing on one man’s experience does not trivialize the weight of the story’s context. Seeing the Holocaust through Saul’s own personal mission gives us a view of the genocide that is unlike any other in cinema. Read More »

Hitchcock Truffaut trailer

For cinephiles, one of the most helpful and revered books is Hitchcock/Truffaut, the 1967 publication that features French filmmaker Francois Truffaut sitting down with legendary director Alfred Hitchcock for a week-long conversation that spanned the master of suspense’s entire career up to that point.

The book (which you can pick up right here) was full of insight and wisdom with regards to Hitchcock’s filmmaking style and sensibilities, and it has been referenced as being a catalyst for opening the eyes of many filmmakers. And now some of cinema’s best have sat down to talk in a documentary that serves as a sort of appendix to the book, providing plenty of details about Hitchcock’s filmmaking process.

Watch the Hitchcock Truffaut trailer after the jump! Read More »

The Walk

As what IMAX calls “An IMAX 3D Experience,” Robert ZemeckisThe Walk is excellent. From the moment Joseph Gordon-Levitt touches his toe on that tightrope, The Wire becomes the kind of intensely visceral experience you can only truly experience in a movie theater*, preferably one equipped with an extra-jumbo screen and 3D projection.

As a narrative feature, however, The Walk is somewhat less accomplished. Gordon-Levitt is as watchable as always, but the film never truly reveals Philippe Petit. In trying to make Petit feel universal, Zemeckis erases what makes him special.

* Well, at least until virtual reality becomes a more common form of entertainment — but more on that later.  Read More »