sundance midnight line-up

The Sundance Film Festival is all about giving small movies from new filmmakers a platform, and their “Midnight” section is all about giving small genre movies from often insane filmmakers a platform from which to disgust, horrify, and shock Fest attendees. The 2016 Festival doesn’t kick off until late January, but the first batch of Midnight movies have been revealed and it’s the expected mix of unknown talent, slightly known talent, and a few well-known people thrown in for good measure.

While most of the Sundance Midnight line-up revealed so far comes courtesy of filmmakers you probably know nothing about (yet), the Fest is also playing new movies from Rob Zombie and Kevin Smith. Hit the jump for more details.

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Richard Gere is one of those movies stars who’s probably slightly undervalued as an actor because of his stardom. But for the past decade, aside from the occasional hokey romance or two, he’s been doing some of his most thoughtful work as a performer. He’s taken on smaller and more intimate projects, frequently playing some wonderfully unlikable and deeply human characters (see The Hoax or The Hunting Party, if you haven’t already). His next film, The Benefactor, premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival this year, and it was met with mostly positive reviews.

After the jump, watch the trailer for The Benefactor.

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new Linklater film

Richard Linklater‘s Everybody Wants Some already has an April 15, 2016 release date locked in thanks to Paramount. But before the film rolls out nationwide, it’s making a quick stop in Linklater’s beloved Austin, Texas. The 1980s-set film has been selected to open the 2016 SXSW Film Festival, which kicks off March 11, 2016. Get more details on the Everybody Wants Some SXSW debut after the jump.  Read More »

Concussion review

The last film we saw with director Peter Landesman‘s name on it was Kill the Messenger, which he scripted. That drama shares a lot in common with Landesman’s sophomore directorial effort, Concussion. Both follow real-life who heroes are simply trying to speak the truth, and yet are treated as villains. Kill the Messenger is the more successful of the two stories, though. Although Concussion is a well-meaning and an undeniably important film, it’s also a by-the-numbers, dramatically frustrating underdog story.

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dangerous men clip

I’ve seen Dangerous Men twice now and it’s just as brain-breaking as the trailer implies. John Rad‘s mesmerizing B-movie cocktail of sex, violence, and revenge brought the house down at this year’s Fantastic Fest and it will soon start collapsing movie theater roofs all over the nation (in a purely metaphorical manner, of course). There are a ton of great “bad” movies out there, but this film, shot over 26 years by a bootstrapping Iranian immigrant, is top-notch, grade-A insanity. There has never been anything else quite like it – it has no right to exist or to be seen in any format beyond a crummy VHS tape passed along from one curious set of hands to another. But here it is.

We’re pleased to present an exclusive new clip from Dangerous Men, which is being re-released by Drafthouse Films, a company that has a habit of rescuing odd and unusual films from oblivion. These 60 seconds represent only a tiny fraction of the movie’s pleasures. Know that the fight scene depicted in the video below isn’t even the most bizarre fight scene in the movie. There’s a lot more where this came from.

Prepare to have your psyche annihilated by the new Dangerous Men clip after the jump.

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Hello My Name is Doris trailer

Hello, My Name is Doris premiered at this year’s South by Southwest. The film, co-written and directed by Michael Showalter (Wet Hot American Summer), was acquired by Roadside Attractions after its premiere for the price of $1.75 million, the biggest purchase made at the festival this year. The comedy, starring Sally Field (Lincoln), also won the audience award for headliners. Watch the Hello, My Name is Doris trailer after the jump.

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Cool Posts From Around the Web:

nightmare before christmas halloween

It’s one of the greatest cinematic controversies of all time. Since international law allows you to only watch The Nightmare Before Christmas once per year, fans of the 1993 stop-motion animated musical have long debated the more appropriate time to view the film. Is it a weird and creepy Christmas movie, or a Halloween movie with with a peppermint-flavored candy shell? It only took 22 years, but someone finally decided to ask director Henry Selick, who gave the definitive answer: it’s an October movie.

Find Selick’s reasoning for the Nightmare Before Christmas Halloween movie label after the jump.

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The 12 Best Films at Fantastic Fest 2015

Fantastic Fest 2015

This year marked my first time attending the the Austin-based Fantastic Fest, and I’m glad I went. How good is the festival? Well, the first film I saw, which is no. 1 on this list, blew my socks off. The movies I saw after that grand introduction, for the most part, didn’t make for a downhill slope. After the jump, read about the 12 best films at Fantastic Fest 2015.

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Steve Jobs

Were you to go into Steve Jobs having no idea who Steve Jobs was, Steve Jobs wouldn’t really tell you. The character (played by Michael Fassbender) explains to a pissed-off Steve Wozniak (Seth Rogen) at one point that he “play[s] the orchestra” like a symphony conductor — but as Wozniak points out, it’s one of those sentences that sounds cool but doesn’t really mean anything in concrete terms.

For most biopics, this would be a failing, but for a Steve Jobs biopic in 2015, it’s an asset. We don’t need a movie to tell us who Steve Jobs is as a tech guru. I’m currently typing this review on my Apple keyboard, which is linked to my MacBook Air, with my iPhone 6 by my side; I know exactly who Steve Jobs, Apple CEO, is. Steve Jobs feels a revelation because it exposes Steve Jobs, the man.  Read More »