Violence in Shane Black Movies

There’s no shortage of violence in movies today. Whether it’s superheroes fighting each other, spies being betrayed by their superiors, sentient foods being eaten by people or even frustrated fowl, almost every movie has a little bit of violence. But when it comes to the movies of writer/director Shane Black, there’s probably a little more than usual. However, as a new video essay points out, there’s something special about how the director of The Nice Guys and the writer of Lethal Weapon uses violence in his films.

Watch the video essay on violence in Shane Black movies after the jump. Read More »

Hollywood History

There are plenty of people out there who consider themselves movies buffs just because they watch tons of movies. However, to be a true cinephile, you must have an inherent desire to learn about the history of film, from its early beginnings in silent cinema through the creation of today’s contemporary studio system.

If you’re just now looking to learn more about the relatively short history of Tinseltown, then a new video runs through some of the finer points of the rise and fall of Hollywood, covering each era in a brief but informative way. It’s extremely basic, but it’s the perfect crash course for someone who is just starting to explore film history. Read More »

Video: Stranger Things Film References Side By Side Comparison

Yes, Stranger Things is very much an homage to the movies of the 1970s and 1980s, but I think it’s a bit too simplistic to say it’s just an Amblin homage. It’s not just another Super 8, and it’s more than repackaged nostalgia. I’m only a handful of episodes into the first season, and it seems that the series is more of a tribute to the cinematic adaptations of Stephen King and the era horror films than Steven Spielberg. Regardless of the inspirations, Stranger Things is must-see television. There aren’t many movies this summer that are more worth your time than this Netflix original series.

Ulysses Thevenon has put together a fantastic four-and-a-half-minute video showing side-by-side comparisons of some of the films that the Duffer Brothers pay homage to in this television show. Hit the jump to watch the Stranger Things Film References Side By Side Comparison video.

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rey palpatine theory

Before we begin, let me warn you that if you are not interested or entertained by fan theories, this article and video is not for you. Shut the window and leave now. I’ve always been interested in well-presented arguments, especially for films like Star Wars: The Force Awakens that leave a mystery open for the audience to debate and theorize about. This new video by Vincent Vendetta presents the evidence that Rey might be Emperor Palpatine’s great granddaughter. It’s not a new theory, but the video presents all the “evidence” in a nice and digestible format. Hit the jump to watch the Rey Palatine theory video essay.
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Batman v Superman Video Essay

Since Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice just recently unveiled the Ultimate Edition on Blu-Ray and DVD, the DC Comics movie has been talked about all over again. While the Ultimate Edition has been said to improve upon the theatrical cut of the film, it still undoubtedly has its problems, and a new video essay attempts to explain what the fundamental flaw is in Zack Snyder‘s comic book sequel, and it makes quite a valid point.

Watch the Batman v Superman video essay after the jump. Read More »

Video Game Movies

Even though this year brought the most successful video game movie of all time with Legendary Pictures bringing Warcraft to the big screen, there still hasn’t really been a video game turned into a movie that has struck a chord with audiences and critics alike while also being a big hit at the box office. From the abysmal Super Mario Bros. in 1993 to more recent attempts such as Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time and Max Payne, video game movies have a terrible track record. Now a new video essay attempts to explain why. Read More »

Ghostbusters Screenplay Video Essay

This weekend brings Paul Feig‘s reboot of Ghostbusters to theaters. Even though the reboot doesn’t really measure up to the high profile of the original, it does offer something exciting for a different demographic and a new batch of young people. While the movie is undoubtedly entertaining, it does have ample shortcomings, specifically in the story department, and that’s something that the original had perfected.

Like any good screenplay, the high quality of the final draft of the original Ghostbusters was a result of careful planning, rewriting and simply compelling storytelling. A new video essay takes a look at how the original concept for Ghostbusters changed from the idea Dan Aykroyd had in his head to the movie we ended up seeing in 1984 and have loved ever since. Check out the Ghostbusters screenplay video essay after the jump. Read More »

Independence Day Video Essay

This week we’ll get to see if Independence Day: Resurgence can shake a stick at Roland Emmerich’s original 1996 blockbuster. Some early reviews from select outlets attending the Hollywood premiere indicate that the movie pretty much delivers the fun and silliness of the first one, but that’s something we’ll find out ourselves starting tomorrow evening. In the meantime, let’s take a look back at what made the original Independence Day so great with a video essay that examines just how well-crafted the screenplay is.

Watch the Independence Day video essay after the jump. Read More »

Slow Motion in Movies

Slow motion is used so often today that it’s easy to forget that filmmakers use it as a storytelling tool beyond making action simply look cool. A new video essay dives into the art of slow motion in film by showing how various directors like Martin Scorsese, Quentin Tarantino, Stanley Kubrick, Brian De Palma and more use the tool in different ways.

Learn about how these directors use slow motion in movies after the jump. Read More »

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The Nerdwriter’s latest video “Intertextuality: Hollywood’s New Currency” takes a look at how Hollywood is using our nostalgia to play with our emotions in sequels, remakes and even original movies. Inspired by the recent record-breaking live-action Beauty and the Beast trailer (and heres a good side-by-side comparison that furthers the point of this video essay), Nerdwriter presents the idea of a new kind of currency in Hollywood movies called Intertextuality. Hit the jump to find out what Intertextuality is and watch the video essay.

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