Michael Bay Bayhem

Tony Zhou analyzes director Michael Bay‘s filmmaking style in great video essay titled “What is Bayhem?”. Zhou introduces his video as follows:

There are filmmakers we love and then there’s Michael Bay. Even if you dislike him (as I do), Bay has something valuable to teach us about visual perception. This is an exploration of “Bayhem” — his style of camera movement, composition and editing that creates something overblown, dynamic and distinct.

Many of you may easily discount Michael Bay’s filmmaking as blockbuster popcorn cinema, but Bay has an unmistakable style that others have not been able to easily replicate. Bay’s films are unmistakable. Show me a scene from a Brett Ratner film I’ve never seen and I wouldn’t be able to tell you the director, but show me a scene from a Michael Bay film and his style is instantly recognizable. James Cameron has famously stated that he “studied [Bay's] films and reverse-engineered his shooting style.” Zhou takes an in-depth look at the vocabulary of Bay’s filmmaking style. Watch the “What is Bayhem?” video essay embedded after the jump.

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gameofthroneschildren

It’s been a pretty great season of Game of Thrones, with plenty of new characters (and plenty of killing off of old/new characters) to keep us busy on “A Cast of Kings.” As each season wraps up with several consequential episodes, it’s often easy to forget how much insane stuff happened during the earlier episodes.

Thus, I decided to revisit Season 4 and run down some of the moments that made a big impact on me. Find my Top 10 moments of Game of Thrones: Season 4 after the jump. Note: I ended up using the words “Most badass ____ imaginable” quite a bit. Let’s face it; there were some pretty amazing moments this season!

Feel free to list your own favorite moments in the comments. SPOILERS for the show are fine, but NO SPOILERS from future book developments (violators will have comments deleted and accounts banned).

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Transformers 4 photos

Even on a summer movie calendar jam-packed with big-budget blockbusters, Transformers: Age of Extinction stands out as one of the biggest, most blockbuster-iest of all. Indeed, it was literally designed to be seen on the largest screen you can find — director Michael Bay shot scenes in native IMAX, as this new Transformers IMAX 3D trailer is happy to inform you.

Lest you get blinded by all that flash and glamour, though, we also have two videos that cast a more critical eye on the franchise. Kevin B. Lee‘s video essay Transformers: The Premake is the kind of behind-the-scenes documentary you’ll never see released as a DVD bonus, while Cinema SinsEverything Wrong With Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen reminds us of all the missteps from the second installment. Watch all three videos after the jump.

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How to Train Your Dragon 2 (header)

I saw How to Train Your Dragon seven times in theaters when it was released in 2010. For me, few other films have taken better advantage of the IMAX format, and few have done a better job at conveying the exhilaration of flight. But beyond being a technical marvel, it also had a lot of heart and introduced us to one of the most adorable, heart-melting animated characters ever conceived, Toothless.

This weekend, How to Train Your Dragon 2 hits theaters. Could it live up to my impossibly high expectations? Find my video review after the jump.

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22 Jump Street (9)

/Film’s Germain Lussier called 22 Jump Street (out in theaters this weekend) one of the funniest and best films of the summer. I saw 22 Jump Street this week and found it to be immensely enjoyable. Its knowing references to its bizarre sequel status were amusing, and I loved the gags in the last half of the film, when it felt like directors Chris Miller and Phil Lord felt free to let loose and really play with the film’s reality.

I spoke with Germain about why he loved the film so much and how 22 Jump Street avoids being a repetitive sequel in the vein of Hangover 2. Find our video review after the jump.
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VOTD: The Visual Comedy of Edgar Wright

Hot Fuzz Cornetto

Who doesn’t love a good video essay, especially when it’s timely and eye-opening? Enter Tony Zhou, who ade an 8-minute video called “Edgar Wright – How To Do Visual Comedy.” The thesis here is basically that most mainstream comedy is directed in a very lazy way. There are close-ups of people talking, recognizable landmarks, pop music playing, and other such staple elements. For his own films, on the other hand, Wright comes up with fun, innovative ways to portray scenes other movies would do simply. This energy and pizazz naturally creatures humor in the filmmaking, instead of just relying on a screenplay.

This thesis is especially interesting considering the rumors of Wright’s departure from Ant-Man over creative differences. Did Marvel and Disney not trust Wright would make Ant-Man everything they wanted it to be? Check out the video Edgar Wright comedy below. Read More »

x-men-mystique

Fourteen years and six movies after the first X-Men hit theaters, Bryan Singer returns to the X-Men universe to try and breathe new life into a waning franchise. The task that Singer and writer Simon Kinberg created for themselves is challenging: to unify two separate timelines through a time travel conceit, and to make it feel as coherent and grand as possible. I’m happy to say that they largely pull it off. X-Men: Days of Future Past is my favorite summer film so far and possibly my favorite X-Men film ever.

See my full video review after the jump. See also Russ’s review and my thoughts on 5 big continuity issues in the film.
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su-zakana

We recently had on director Vincenzo Natali to discuss making Season 2, Episode 8 of Hannibal, “Su-Zukana.” That /Filmcast episode featured an incredibly graphic scene involving a horse, and I just had to ask Natali for details on how it was created. See a video essay of him describing the making of the episode after the jump.
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