It director interview

Bill Skarsgard‘s small roles in movies like Allegiant and Atomic Blonde didn’t leave much of an impact on me, but after seeing his terrifying take on Pennywise the Dancing Clown in the new adaptation of Stephen King‘s It, he certainly has my attention. Director Andy Muschietti saw something in the young actor’s audition that no one else did, and together they crafted a new version of Pennywise that’s frightening, otherworldly, and truly feels as if you’re watching evil incarnated.

At the film’s press junket last week, I participated in a roundtable interview with Muschietti and Skarsgard and spoke with them about this updated Pennywise, casting the Losers’ Club kids, and one of Skarsgard’s acting choices as Pennywise that particularly fascinated me.
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bojack horseman 3

“Where’s Bojack” is the mystery of Bojack Horseman’s fourth season, and also the feeling of fans who’ve been waiting since they binge-watched season 3 last summer. Last season featured the landmark episode “Fish Out of Water” in which Bojack (Will Arnett) attended an underwater film festival, featured Bojack finding out he had a long lost daughter, and introduced Mr. Peanutbutter’s (Paul F. Tompkins) plan to for office.

/Film has been pursuing Bojack Horseman creator Raphael Bob-Waksberg for several years now, so we had a lot to talk about when we finally spoke by phone. We spoke vaguely about season 4, so that you could read this either before or after you watch the season, and discussed general questions that have been percolating about the show for four years.

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It producer interview

Last week, I attended the press junket for Warner Bros. new film adaptation of Stephen King’s It, the horror story about an ancient entity that terrorizes and feeds on the children of Derry, Maine and often takes the form of a menacing clown named Pennywise. Along with a handful of other writers, I spoke with producers Seth Grahame-Smith (Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter) and David Katzenberg (The Goldbergs) about the challenges of bringing such a classic book to the big screen, Bill Skarsgard‘s intense performance, a possible sequel, and more.
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Stephen King's It

At 1150 pages, Stephen King’s It is a daunting prospect for adaptation. That’s why the first attempt was a TV miniseries. For the feature film, It is split into at least two films, with the one opening this week focusing on “The Losers’ Club” as children in 1989. The bullied outcasts of Derry, Maine face Pennywise the clown (Bill Skarsgard) and other nightmares manifested by a horrific force the kids only refer to as “It.”

Screenwriter Gary Dauberman took on the adaptation, which King himself has approved. Dauberman had a hit this summer with Annabelle: Creation and wrote another entry in the ever-expanding The Conjuring universe, The Nun. But even with that much horror movie experience, adapting Stephen King’s massive novel was still a massive undertaking. We kicked off our interview by talking about how you even get started with an undertaking like that.

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Inhumans Showrunner Interview

The next Marvel TV series will hit theaters before it lands on ABC. Marvel’s Inhumans will play its first two episodes on IMAX screens, albeit as a shorter cut. From showrunner Scott Buck (Iron Fist), Inhumans is a more family friendly show than Marvel’s Netflix offerings. It’s about superheroes who live on the moon, but come down to Hawaii with their teleporting dog Lockjaw.

Black Bolt (Anson Mount) is the silent king of Attilan, the Inhumans’ home on the moon. He communicates with his Queen Medusa (Serinda Swan) via a sign language that Mount created himself (so far it’s a 50 page Google doc, he says). When Black Bolt’s brother Maximus leads an uprising, the Inhumans flee to Earth where their adventure begins.

Buck spoke with /Film at the ABC party for the Television Critics Association.

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Jay Baruchel interview

With Goon: Last of the Enforcers, actor and writer Jay Baruchel makes his feature directorial debut. He previously directed an episode of Trailer Park Boys and a short film, Edgar and Jane, but the very first Jay Baruchel film is the sequel to a beloved sports comedy he co-wrote. In the Goon sequel, which arrives five years after the first movie, the fights are bloodier, the fighters are more tired, and the future is less bright.

Doug Glatt (Sean William Scott) finally found his calling in Goon. In the sequel, his days are numbered on the ice, so the lovable goon with a massive fist finds himself lost again. Baruchel doesn’t forget the laughs, of course, but as he pointed out in our interview, hockey is changing for the enforcers, with fights dropping in the NHL. That sea change is a part of Goon: Last of the Enforcers, which Baruchel was happy to discuss along with how the sequel evolved and died twice, writing the legendary Ross Rhea (Liev Schreiber), and all the well-deserved love for the first Goon.

Below, check out our Jay Baruchel interview.

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Narcos Showrunner Interview

The second season finale of Narcos told viewers what season three was going to be about. Javier Pena (Pedro Pascal) was recruited to pursue the Cali Cartel. Narcos season 3 picks up the Cali Cartel story, who celebrated the demise of their rival (and seasons 1 and 2 lead) Escobar.

Narcos show runner Eric Newman spoke with /Film by phone about the show’s third season. Newman is also producer of the upcoming Netflix original movie Bright starring Will Smith and directed by David Ayer. He’s also attached to some high profile movies with directors Jon Favreau and Matt Reeves.

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THE GARBAGE PAIL KIDS MOVIE, Anthony Newley (l.), Mackenzie Astin (back), 1987, ©Atlantic Releasing Corp.

A famous poet once said:

You take the good…

You take the bad…

You take them both and there you have…the facts of life. 

And in 1986, these were the facts of life for an ambitious child actor by the name of Mackenzie Astin: He was 14 years old, he was dating a beautiful teenage actress and he had recently been promoted to series regular of a popular sitcom called—you guessed it—The Facts of Life.

Everything was going great for Mackenzie, but there was just one problem: things were going even better for his older brother, Sean, who had just finished working with Steven Spielberg and Richard Donner on a little film called The Goonies.

And so, almost as if inspired by his brother’s speech in The Goonies, Mackenzie Astin asked himself: when’s it gonna be my time? When am I gonna get to star in a blockbuster movie of my own? And, just as these feelings of sibling rivalry reached a crescendo, such an opportunity seemed to come around: The Garbage Pail Kids Movie. Wow, Mackenzie thought. A whole movie based on those cool, subversive trading cards! How could this possibly go wrong?

Well it did. In almost every single conceivable way. So I sat down with Mackenzie Astin to recount that traumatic cinematic experience and the ripples that would follow…

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death note movie clip

Adam Wingard has made a name for himself with horror movies like You’re Next and The Guest and his latest contribution to the genre made waves when Netflix swooped in to rescue it from turnaround after it was developed at Warner Brothers. Based on the manga, which itself had been adapted in anime and live-action in Japan, Death Note arrives on Netflix this Friday.

Light Turner (Nat Wolff) finds a notebook that says it can kill anyone whose name he writes while picturing their face. The demon Ryuk (Willem Dafoe) makes sure to point out all the other rules listed. Light and Mia (Margaret Qualley) start researching deserving war criminals and prisoners to kill. But an investigator named L (Lakeith Stanfield) starts piecing it together, hiding his face and true name. Wingard spoke with /Film by phone out of New York about Death Note, and gave a preview of his next film, Godzilla vs. Kong.

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What Happened to Monday Interview

Netflix has another original movie premiere this weekend. What Happened to Monday stars Noomi Rapace, Noomi Rapace, Noomi Rapace, Noomi Rapace, Noomi Rapace, Noomi Rapace and Noomi Rapace as septuplets in a dystopian future with a single child limit. As a young girl (Clara Read), her father (Willem Dafoe) came up with a plan to make all seven siblings live one life. Named after each day of the week, they take turns living one life.

Tommy Wirkola directed What Happened to Monday and spoke to /Film by phone this week about the film. The director of Dead Snow and Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters talked us through turning the siblings from men to women, learning visual effects tricks from Orphan Black and what exactly his future looks like.

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