Jay Baruchel interview

With Goon: Last of the Enforcers, actor and writer Jay Baruchel makes his feature directorial debut. He previously directed an episode of Trailer Park Boys and a short film, Edgar and Jane, but the very first Jay Baruchel film is the sequel to a beloved sports comedy he co-wrote. In the Goon sequel, which arrives five years after the first movie, the fights are bloodier, the fighters are more tired, and the future is less bright.

Doug Glatt (Sean William Scott) finally found his calling in Goon. In the sequel, his days are numbered on the ice, so the lovable goon with a massive fist finds himself lost again. Baruchel doesn’t forget the laughs, of course, but as he pointed out in our interview, hockey is changing for the enforcers, with fights dropping in the NHL. That sea change is a part of Goon: Last of the Enforcers, which Baruchel was happy to discuss along with how the sequel evolved and died twice, writing the legendary Ross Rhea (Liev Schreiber), and all the well-deserved love for the first Goon.

Below, check out our Jay Baruchel interview.

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Narcos Showrunner Interview

The second season finale of Narcos told viewers what season three was going to be about. Javier Pena (Pedro Pascal) was recruited to pursue the Cali Cartel. Narcos season 3 picks up the Cali Cartel story, who celebrated the demise of their rival (and seasons 1 and 2 lead) Escobar.

Narcos show runner Eric Newman spoke with /Film by phone about the show’s third season. Newman is also producer of the upcoming Netflix original movie Bright starring Will Smith and directed by David Ayer. He’s also attached to some high profile movies with directors Jon Favreau and Matt Reeves.

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THE GARBAGE PAIL KIDS MOVIE, Anthony Newley (l.), Mackenzie Astin (back), 1987, ©Atlantic Releasing Corp.

A famous poet once said:

You take the good…

You take the bad…

You take them both and there you have…the facts of life. 

And in 1986, these were the facts of life for an ambitious child actor by the name of Mackenzie Astin: He was 14 years old, he was dating a beautiful teenage actress and he had recently been promoted to series regular of a popular sitcom called—you guessed it—The Facts of Life.

Everything was going great for Mackenzie, but there was just one problem: things were going even better for his older brother, Sean, who had just finished working with Steven Spielberg and Richard Donner on a little film called The Goonies.

And so, almost as if inspired by his brother’s speech in The Goonies, Mackenzie Astin asked himself: when’s it gonna be my time? When am I gonna get to star in a blockbuster movie of my own? And, just as these feelings of sibling rivalry reached a crescendo, such an opportunity seemed to come around: The Garbage Pail Kids Movie. Wow, Mackenzie thought. A whole movie based on those cool, subversive trading cards! How could this possibly go wrong?

Well it did. In almost every single conceivable way. So I sat down with Mackenzie Astin to recount that traumatic cinematic experience and the ripples that would follow…

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death note movie clip

Adam Wingard has made a name for himself with horror movies like You’re Next and The Guest and his latest contribution to the genre made waves when Netflix swooped in to rescue it from turnaround after it was developed at Warner Brothers. Based on the manga, which itself had been adapted in anime and live-action in Japan, Death Note arrives on Netflix this Friday.

Light Turner (Nat Wolff) finds a notebook that says it can kill anyone whose name he writes while picturing their face. The demon Ryuk (Willem Dafoe) makes sure to point out all the other rules listed. Light and Mia (Margaret Qualley) start researching deserving war criminals and prisoners to kill. But an investigator named L (Lakeith Stanfield) starts piecing it together, hiding his face and true name. Wingard spoke with /Film by phone out of New York about Death Note, and gave a preview of his next film, Godzilla vs. Kong.

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What Happened to Monday Interview

Netflix has another original movie premiere this weekend. What Happened to Monday stars Noomi Rapace, Noomi Rapace, Noomi Rapace, Noomi Rapace, Noomi Rapace, Noomi Rapace and Noomi Rapace as septuplets in a dystopian future with a single child limit. As a young girl (Clara Read), her father (Willem Dafoe) came up with a plan to make all seven siblings live one life. Named after each day of the week, they take turns living one life.

Tommy Wirkola directed What Happened to Monday and spoke to /Film by phone this week about the film. The director of Dead Snow and Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters talked us through turning the siblings from men to women, learning visual effects tricks from Orphan Black and what exactly his future looks like.

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chris columbus interview 3

Patti Cake$ was one of the the breakout hist of Sundancee 2017. Newcomer writer/director Geremy Jasper discovered Aussie Danielle Macdonald to play his title character, New Jersey rapper Patti Cake$. The film also stars Bridget Everett as Patti’s mom, lounge singer Barb, and newcomer Siddharth Dhananjay.

The producer of Patti Cake$ is someone who’s been in the lives of movie fans since the ‘80s. Chris Columbus produced the film with his company Maiden Voyage, which he runs with his daughter, Eleanor. The director of Home Alone, Adventures in Babysitting and the first two Harry Potter movies spoke with /Film about Patti Cake$ and Maiden Voyage, which also produced the film Menashe, about a Hadisic father and his son.

We had a long conversation with Columbus about the state of the film industry…and his plans for Gremlins 3.

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the guest book interview 1

It’s not too late to catch up on TBS’s new comedy The Guest Book. This week brings the third episode, and even though it’s an anthology series, you’ll want to keep up. Set at the Froggy Cottage cabin, each week sees a new guest check in with a new story. However, the manager Wilfred (Charlie Robinson) and the strippers from nearby Chubby’s are always there, and single father Andrew Brown (Garret Dillahunt) seems to be staying longer.

Creator Greg Garcia (My Name Is Earl, Raising Hope, The Millers) got the idea when he  started writing funny stories in guest books where he stayed. The Guest Book is based on those stories, and they will all pay off in the season finale. Garcia spoke with /Film by phone last week, in a good mood since episode two saw increased viewership.

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HOLD FOR EXCLUSIVE

Get Shorty was a hit movie in 1995, part of John Travolta’s post-Pulp Fiction comeback. He played Chili Palmer, a shylock who came to Hollywood to collect a debt from a producer (Gene Hackman) and fell in love with the movie business. The success of the movie inspired Elmore Leonard to write a sequel. Be Cool was also made into a movie starring Travolta.

On Epix, Get Shorty can get away with the same level of sex and violence as an HBO show. The original series does not adapt Leonard’s text. Instead, it is an original story that shares similar themes. Miles Daly (Chris O’Dowd) comes to Hollywood to collect from a screenwriter, then tries to produce the script, enlisting a has-been schlock producer (Ray Romano) to help.

Series creator Davey Holmes and executive producer/director Adam Arkin spoke with /Film about Get Shorty, which premiered last night on Epix.

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matt spicer interview

With Ingrid Thorburn (Aubrey Plaza) leading the way in Ingrid Goes West, it’s often tough to predict which direction Matt Spicer‘s dark comedy will go in next. Ingrid goes to great lengths to turn Taylor Sloane (Elizabeth Olsen) into her best friend so the whole world can see her Instagram. Aubrey’s character searches for a friend in a sad, laugh-filled descent in the sunny, “good vibes only” part of California.

Ingrid Goes West calls to mind movies like The Cable GuyTaxi Driver, and The Talented Mr. Ripley. There’s a loneliness to the lead characters of those movies that can also be found in Ingrid. Her motive is wanting friendship. Yeah, she’s deceptive in the course of her journey, but so are a lot of the characters in Spicer’s feature directorial debut, which he co-wrote with David Branson Smith.

Below, check out our Matt Spicer interview, where we chat all about the new movie, which is in theaters today.

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kelli maroney

Kelli Maroney has a unique skill set: she knows how to survive ’80s horror movies.

Between Slayground (1983), Night of the Comet (1984) and this week’s How Did This Get Made? film Chopping Mall (1986), Maroney has a real talent for making it through a slasher flick alive. So naturally, when she and I sat down to speak, I couldn’t help but ask: what does it take to pull of this feat?

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