The Never-ending Story Tami Stronach interview

When I saw the Spotify ad with all grown up Atreyu flying around on Falcor listening to Limahl’s theme song to The Neverending Story, I tweeted about it. This caught the attention of Tami Stronach, who when she was 11 played the Childlike Empress in the film. She’s been engaging fans with Falcor drawing contests and news about her current activities, so I arranged an interview with Stronach by phone out of New York.

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new casey jones origin

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows brings back all the heroes in a half shell from the last film, but it also introduces a brand-new hero into this world: Casey Jones, played by Stephen Amell. And although the hockey-stick wielding vigilante has been a part of the Turtles mythology since the ’80s, Amell gets to build the character from the ground up, and bring some new twists to him in the process.

“We are meeting the character at a very early part of his evolution,” Amell told me during a post-set visit interview.  “When we meet Casey Jones in the movie, he’s not a vigilante, he’s a corrections officer.” Amell knows his character looks more “clean cut” than past iterations, and that’s by design. “Basically, you’re looking at a Casey Jones that tried to do it the good way and tried to live on the straight and narrow, and it just didn’t work out for him,” he teased. “And so he gets that glint in his eye, maybe a few shadings of what might become as a character.”

While we’ve got a few more weeks to wait until we really get to meet the new Casey Jones, Paramount has revealed a nice little taste of Amell’s performance — including his rough and athletic fighting style — in a brand-new Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2 clip. Watch the video, and then read our full interview with Amell, below.  Read More »

civilwar-onset-russos-stan-evans

A decade ago, the two films Anthony and Joe Russo had under their belts were Welcome to Collinwood and You, Me and Dupree. Now they’re the filmmakers behind Captain America: The Winter Soldier and Captain America: Civil War. The Russo brothers were initially a surprising choice to direct The Winter Soldier for some Marvel fans, in particular for those unfamiliar with their background in television, but they ultimately proved any skeptics wrong.

Obviously, Marvel is quite pleased with what the directors have done with their heroes, as the duo are currently gearing up to shoot Avengers: Infinity War later this year. Delivering “culmination films of everything that has happened in the Marvel universe” is no small task — indeed, it’s an incredible amount of pressure — but Civil War shows they’re up for the challenge, considering the massive balancing act they’ve accomplished with Marvel’s latest.

In our Anthony and Joe Russo interview, the brothers discuss deconstructing the superhero genre, the film’s central conflict, and Avengers: Infinity War. They both jump into spoiler territory right at the start, so, like our interview with screenwriters Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely, you may want to wait to read this SPOILER-heavy discussion until after you’ve seen Captain America: Civil War.

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Feige

Marvel Studios has come a long way since 2008’s Iron Man. At the time, who would’ve thought that box office hit would pave the way for a superhero frenzy in Hollywood? Perhaps Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige — the man that helped build the Marvel Cinematic Universe — knew. Feige’s latest offering is Captain America: Civil War, a superhero showdown pitting Team Cap and against Team Iron Man.

Directed by Anthony and Joe Russo, Civil War is a rather large ensemble story, full of familiar and new characters. Both Black Panther and Spider-Man get plenty of screentime, but more importantly, they serve a purpose in the story. We discussed these two new additions to the MCU with Feige, who also talked about the lessons he learned from the first Iron ManCivil War‘s airport set piece, Ant-Man and the Wasp, and more.

Below, read our Kevin Feige interview. Warning: SPOILERS ahead.

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Captain America Civil War

Captain America: Civil War marks screenwriters Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely‘s fifth collaboration with Marvel, after Captain America: The First Avenger, Thor 2: The Dark WorldCaptain America: Winter Soldier, and their work on Agent Carter. So it’s not surprising Marvel selected the screenwriting duo to handle an undertaking as large as Avengers: Infinity War.

The stories Markus and McFeely are telling continue to increase in scope, but the two rarely lose sight of character and the story at hand, never spending too much time teasing the future of the MCU. Considering the fact that they had to set up Black Panther, the new Spider-Man, and a tiny bit of Infinity War, it’s impressive how focused and cleanly told Civil War‘s narrative is. Perhaps in less capable hands, Marvel’s latest easily could have been a complete mess.

To learn how the script came together, read our Christoper Markus and Stephen McFeely interview below. Be warned there are SPOILERS ahead for Captain America: Civil War.

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solarbabies oral history

In 1970, an L.A.-born artist who went by the name “Metrov” moved to New York City. He began the decade working as a designer for the famed Push Pin Studios and then eventually made a name for himself as a fine arts painter, working out of a loft studio across the street from Andy Warhol’s Factory. 

In 1979, inspired by a friend and guerilla filmmaker, Metrov came up with an idea for a low-budget, high-concept movie he wanted to direct: Solarbabies. This is a story about what happened next—how it was sold to Mel Brooks, how it was directed by a choreographer—and why, by the time Solarbabies was finally shot, its creator was no longer involved in his creation. 

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The Family Fang trailer

Actor Jason Bateman made his feature directorial debut with the 2013 comedy, Bad Words. Bateman’s sophomore effort, The Family Fang, is a slightly less aggressive film. Bateman’s adaptation of Kevin Wilson‘s novel, written by David Lindsay-Abaire (Rabbit Hole), simply called for a more reserved approach than his first film –although The Family Fang isn’t without its comedic moments, like when Bateman’s character gets beamed in the head by a potato gun.

The Family Fang stars Bateman, Nicole KidmanChristopher Walken, and Maryann Plunkett. Growing up, the Fang siblings were involved — or “used,” depending on how you look at it — in their parents’ performance art. When the famous performance artists go missing, the brother and sister (Bateman and Kidman) begin to dig deeper into the past, trying to understand the exact effect their parents had on them.

Read our Jason Bateman interview below.

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Will Forte

It’s hard to believe Will Forte left Saturday Night Live six years ago. When Forte mentioned it’s been that long since he was on the show, he, too, looked surprised by that fact. After spending a decade working on SNL, the actor has appeared in a variety of films, including Alexander Payne‘s NebraskaPeter Bogdanovich‘s She’s Funny That Way, and, of course, the actor’s crowning achievement, Jorma Taccone‘s big screen adaptation of MacGruber.

Forte co-stars in Peter Atencio‘s Keanu, a comedy from the team behind Comedy Central’s Key & Peele. The former SNL star’s role as a drug dealer, Hulka, is brief but, thanks to some cornrows and an unforgettable voice, he leaves an impression with his performance.

Below, read our Will Forte interview.

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cedric nicolas

With The Huntsman: Winter’s War, director Cedric Nicolas-Troyan makes his feature directorial debut with the fantasy sequel. Nicolas-Troyan worked on Snow White and The Huntsman, as a visual effects supervisor and second-unit director. After the experience of collaborating with director Rupert Sanders, the 47-year-old visual effects artist decided to finally direct a movie of his own.

The sequel stars Chris HemsworthJessica ChastainEmily Blunt, and Charlize Theron. This time around, the story centers around Hemsworth’s Eric the Huntsman, who must retrieve the lost mirror for Snow White, in order to prevent — you guessed it — winter’s war.

Below, read our Cedric Nicolas-Troyan interview, in which he discusses his debut feature, a surprise narrator in the film, a key VFX shot, and, of course, Gore Verbinski‘s 2005 drama, The Weather Man.

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