While appearing on the Howard Stern Show on Sirius/XM Satalite Radio, comedian Lisa Lampanelli revealed that she had been cast in Sopranos creator David Chase‘s highly anticipated feature film project. The story has been kept under wraps, but Lampanelli gives us an interesting bit of info: she will be playing David Chase’s mother in the movie, because she believes this is a movie about Chase’s teenage years (I’m assuming that it might be inspired by his experiences, much like Cameron Crowe’s Almost Famous).

EDIT: In fact, Paramount informs us that her character is an aunt, and that the mother is being played by Molly Price of Third Watch.

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Will 2011 be a year of cinematic fairy tale revamps? There are dueling Snow White films in the works, and now Paramount has taken the next step to move forward with Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters. Jeremy Renner was said to be circling the role of the adult Hansel, which is now apparently a locked piece of casting, and now Paramount has cast Gemma Arterton as his sister Gretel. Read More »

Movie Trailer & Poster: ’13′

A few months back, we posted a Russian movie trailer for 13, the American remake of the cult French film 13 Tzameti, starring Jason Statham, Mickey Rourke, 50 Cent and Ray Winstone, both written and directed by Géla Babluani. It’s about a young man (Sam Riley) who mistakenly ends up at a high stakes, life or death Russian roulette game. So if you watched that original trailer and liked the visuals but had no idea what was going on, an English language version has come online along with a poster. And if you never imagined you’d be bored by a simple movie trailer, prove yourself wrong after the break. Read More »

Movie Trailer: The Long-Delayed ‘Case 39′


If the trailer for Case 39 looks like a time capsule, that’s because it is. The film was shot in 2006, at a point when it looked more weird to see Bradley Cooper in a leading role, and less weird to see Renee Zellweger onscreen at all. Now the film is finally close to being released, on October 10, and so there’s an all-new trailer for the rather old film. Read More »

Movie Trailer: Middle Men

There’s a new trailer for Middle Men, the film that follows the career of Christopher Malick. He’s no relation to Terrence Malick; rather, this is the guy who first enabled the proper monetization of porn on the internet. By providing credit card access to porn sites, he essentially became a funnel for cash. We’ve seen one red band clip before, but this trailer is good at capturing the ‘anything goes’ mentality of the early internet days. Read More »

Here’s some pretty solid indication that apocalyptic zombie epic World War Z will finally be coming to the big screen soon: Paramount have renewed their option on the book for what its author Max Brooks described as “half the time and twice the money”. That’s not the kind of cheque you just throw out there, so I can only imagine the studio is going to be making some serious moves to bring the film to life, and soon.

In his interview with Fear Net, Brooks also confirms that Marc Forster is still attached to direct. Will he stay attached all the way to the first day of shooting?

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

david chase

Mike Flemming has learned that Sopranos creator David Chase is set to go into production on a music-driven coming-of-age rock drama in late summer/early fall. The unititled film will be Chase’s big screen directing debut, and is said to be “about a bunch of guys who form a rock band in the 1960s.” Chase wrote the screenplay himself, and the film will be released by Paramount Pictures’ indie label Paramount Vantage.

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Not too long ago, Paramount Vantage seemed like one of the best faux-indie arms out there. As recently as 2007, the studio indie had two major heavyweight pictures: No Country For Old Men and There Will Be Blood. But the label was folded into the heaving, tentpole-happy bosom of Paramount Pictures, a process which has left pictures essentially orphaned, waiting to be dumped. One of them is Todd Louiso‘s The Marc Pease Experience, and the filmmaker is understandably frustrated by the decision. Read More »


With only two feature films and one TV show to his name, writer/director Jody Hill, is now synonymous with ignoring the boundaries and “genre rules” of modern comedy and creating anti-heroes that laughably burble with nihilistic rage, scary faux pas and hot-air egos. But there is also an internal depth to these macho doofuses played by Hill’s longtime pal and writing partner, Danny McBride, and comedy star Seth Rogen, to surpass the high art of a perfectly-timed and pronounced “fuck.”

Hill’s work on Observe & Report, The Foot Fist Way, and his cultural breakthrough, HBO‘s Eastbound & Down, contains more glass-darkly social commentary and life-lived expression than the work of any hotshot young novelist in recent memory. Rather than document the cold realities and indulgent pleasantries of another big city with bright lights, Hill is set on exploring the very place that so many creative-types vacate upon the arrival of their first Visa card or college acceptance letter: the American South. Moreover, as many middle-class and broke white American males face sobering, if inevitable, realizations and disillusions about the future, laughing at Hill’s moronic, unhinged versions as they champion outdated movie/sports star heroics atop small-town kingdoms is like homemade medicine. When it comes to countering the monotony of the average day-to-day? Eastbound is harder to beat still. The sight of Kenny Powers “dancing” in a middle school gym under the influence of eggrolls and ecstasy or ejecting a topless broad from his Jet Ski is priceless. Like cheetah-spotted gold or “a bulletproof tiger, dude.”

A native of North Carolina, Hill is the latest progeny of the North Carolina School of the Arts, alongside McBride and creative partner Ben Best, fellow EB&D director David Gordon Green (Pineapple Express), and EB&D cinematographer Tim Orr. In the first part of my interview, we discuss the show in-depth, including some of the surprising and vile admissions and special features on the Season One DVD. We also talk about what it’s like to be a young director coming from, and staying in, the South, why so many comedians today are from there, and why the region was overdue for a proper comedic depiction.

Hunter Stephenson: Hey Jody, how are you?

Jody Hill: Hey Hunter. Good, good, good. Hey man, I wanted to say that I was sorry I wasn’t there when you visited down in Wilmington [Eastbound & Down set, 2008]. I remember the piece you wrote, and it sounded like a really good time. [laughs] Sucks I couldn’t there, man; I was editing my film (Observe & Report), and Warner Bros. wouldn’t let me go. When you have to do a director’s cut, they want to lock you up for 10 weeks. [laughs] Everybody said they had a blast…and I was editing.

Yeah. I expected to interview you there. And I didn’t know about the change, that David Green was now directing the majority of the episodes while you were in L.A. But it all worked out, he killed it. My first question: Legend has it that when you, Danny [McBride], and Ben [Best] first conceived of Kenny Powers you were sitting in a kiddie pool in North Carolina drinking beers. [laughs] Is that accurate?

Jody Hill: [laughs] Yeah, this was before we made Foot Fist Way or anything. We were trying to come up with ideas for shows. I was between jobs; I had been working this really shit reality show job, doing motion-control for Behind the Music and shit like that. [laughs] It was pretty lame. And so, yeah, we were in Charlotte, in the backyard of Ben Best’s house. And yeah, we were literally sitting in a kiddie pool with a case of beer. And Kenny was one of the ideas that, uh, we came up with. [laughs]

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