The D Train Trailer
One of the films I enjoyed at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival but didn’t get around to reviewing is The D Train. Directed by Jarrad Paul and Andrew Mogel, the new indie dramedy tells the story of a loser (Jack Black) who believes he’ll win his way into the cool kids club if he can convince Oliver Lawless (James Marsden), the most popular guy from his high school who’s now the face of a national Banana Boat ad campaign, to show up with him to their class reunion.

Remember when we use to love Jack Black? He’s back at full force in this new film, but the spotlight shifts to James Marsden. The film is very traditional in execution (as you’ll see in the trailer) but the story takes some interesting swerves you wouldn’t expect from a big screen comedy (unfortunately the trailer strongly hints at the more compelling turns). IFC has released The D Train trailer, and you can watch it now embedded after the jump. Please leave your thoughts in the comments below.

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boyhood honest trailer

One of the biggest complaints we hear about Richard Linklater‘s Boyhood is that it doesn’t have a story. There’s no real strong narrative. If made this script in 12 weeks instead of 12 years, it would be terrible. Maybe all of that is true. But the movie was made over 12 years. It’s not a movie about the story. It’s a slice of life, a film whose form is saying as much, if not more, than the narrative. Either you buy into that or you don’t and that’s probably the line between people who think Boyhood is a masterpiece, or a piece of something else.

The Honest Trailer team seems to fall into that latter camp. There’s some appreciation in their Boyhood Honest Trailer but, mostly, it’s judging the film for something it isn’t. Nevertheless, they’ve made a pretty funny parody of the song Hero by Family of the Year that makes the Boyhood Honest Trailer worth watching. Check it out below. Read More »

Seymour: An Introduction trailer

If you’re tempted to think “oh, whatever, a documentary about an old piano player,” based on the subject of this film, I urge you to watch this trailer for Seymour: An Introduction. I guarantee you’ll see it differently. Ethan Hawke has been part of Richard Linklater’s association with IFC thanks to Boyhood, and now he’s made a really tender doc that IFC will distribute later this year. Seymour follows pianist Seymour Bernstein, who quit a concert career in order to teach. Ethan Hawke profiles Bernstein, following not just his life, but his attitudes about life, performance, and priorities.

Watch the Seymour: An Introduction trailer below. Read More »

Babadook Christmas

We’ve praised The Babadook since Sundance. It landed on Angie’s “Best Performances of 2014” list and our “50 Great Movies From 2014” list, and (spoiler) it’ll be on my ranked top ten of 2014, too. In short: see it! (Even Stephen King and The Exorcist director William Friedkin would tell you that.)

The film is on VOD now and in some theaters, too, so you can see it for yourself. If you haven’t seen it yet and are still on the fence, however, maybe a little friendly greeting will get you to give it a shot. This is just like the Charlie Brown Christmas special, only a lot darker. (OK, maybe not quite like that, but it’s still fun.)  Read More »

Duke of Burgundy trailer

As I’ve worked on a “Top Ten Films of 2014″ list I’ve gone back and forth on whether or not to include movies I saw at festivals, but which aren’t yet in general release. If I decide to go the festival route, The Duke of Burgundy will be in my top three for this year. If not, it is likely to be in the top few spots of next year’s list. This ravishing movie is a gorgeous visual experience, as the trailer below will indicate. But the film is also a wonderfully nuanced portrait of a relationship — one which is made seemingly more exotic by its daily particulars, but which, in the end, fraught with the same issues everyone faces. Check out The Duke of Burgundy trailer below.

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boyhood making-of

2014 has been the year of Boyhood, Richard Linklater‘s 12-years in the making chronicle of a Texas family. The film debuted to great praise at Sundance back in January, and twelve months later it is causing a stir as critics groups in Boston and Los Angeles hand it several awards. (Including a well-deserved Best Actress win for Patricia Arquette from the Los Angeles Film Critics Association.) The film hits digital HD today, and will be on DVD and Blu in January. To help promote that digital release, IFC has offered up a great ten-minute video that looks at the twelve-year process of creating the movie. Read More »

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Two Days One Night trailer

The Dardenne Brothers (The Kid With a Bike) aren’t known for working with actors who might also be found in a Christopher Nolan tentpole, but Marion Cotillard is that rare talent who can seem at ease in both environments. And she seems perfectly cast in Two Days, One Night, the new film from the Dardennes, in which Cotillard plays a woman who must rely upon a certain sort of generosity from her co-workers in order to keep her job. It doesn’t sound like much, but that setup is all the Dardennes need to create a stirring film. See the new Two Days, One Night trailer below.

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Hungry Hearts trailer

We all know that Adam Driver co-stars on Girls and that he’ll be in Star Wars: The Force Awakens. (And that he was so great in a small role in Inside Llewyn Davis last year, too.) But there’s a Driver performance most of us haven’t had a chance to see yet, and it is one for which he and his co-star are winning accolades. In Hungry Hearts, Driver and Alba Rohrwacher play a young couple who “engage in a fateful struggle over the life of their newborn child.” If that sounds like some Roman Polanski sorta-atmosphere, that’s what we got out of the Hungry Hearts trailer, too. Check it out below.  Read More »

Goodbye to All That trailer

One indie film that’s mostly flown under the radar is Goodbye to All That, which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival this past spring. But judging by the first trailer, it may be time to give this one a closer look.

Goodbye to All That is the directorial debut of Angus MacLachlan, screenwriter of the remarkable Junebug. Paul Schneider stars as a newly divorced dad trying to navigate the single life for the first time in years. Okay, so the premise sounds a bit familiar, but the execution looks far above average thanks to MacLachlan’s warm, honest approach and engaging performances all around. Watch the first Goodbye to All That trailer after the jump.

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