The Tribe trailer

I saw The Tribe last September, and still think about the movie pretty much every day. No other film has impressed me quite like this one did with its unique creation of drama via sound and image. Few other performances have been as devastating and courageous as those from leads Grigoriy Fesenko and Yana Novikova.

Taking place at a boarding school for the deaf, the film features no spoken dialogue; the characters communicate in sign language and outbursts of violence. There are no subtitles for the sign language, but those communications come through just as clearly as the intent behind the violence. This debut feature from Myroslav Slaboshpytskiy is as confident as they come, and shocking in its unblinking frankness.

Check out the excellent The Tribe trailer below. Read More »

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Look of Silence trailer

Joshua Oppenheimer follows his Oscar-nominated documentary The Act of Killing with The Look of Silence, which continues to explore the aftereffects of the 1965 Indonesian Genocide, and you can see a very powerful Look of Silence trailer below.

While The Act of Killing focused primarily on some of the surviving ringleaders of the genocide, The Look of Silence focuses more specifically on one man, Adi, whose brother was killed during the genocide, and who discovers the identities of his brother’s murderers, and confronts them. More intimate in scope but no less effective and terrifying than The Act of Killing, Oppenheimer’s new companion doc is viewing every bit as essential as his first exploration of the subject. Read More »

The Invitation Drafthouse

Director Karyn Kusama returns this year with The Invitation, which impressed the hell out of me when it debuted in the Midnight program at the recent SXSW film festival. The film watches as a couple (Logan Marshall-Green and Emayatzy Corinealdi) heads to a dinner party thrown by the guy’s former wife and her new partner (Tammy Blanchard and Michiel Huisman), where signs quickly begin to suggest that things are very much off with the hosts. They seem to have been recruited into a cult of some sort, but is their new mindset actually a problem, or just kinda weird?

The Invitation is a gripping thriller with a really ominous tone and a terrific ending. Now Drafthouse Films has picked up the movie for worldwide distribution. Read More »

Spring trailer

The surprising and totally freaky film Spring opens this week after winding its way through a few festivals, including TIFF and Fantastic Fest, and making fans along the way. The film will be in some theaters, and on VOD and even available via BitTorrent Bundle, making it the second film distributed in that manner. But with more films available to viewers every week, even a unique film has to take every chance it has to reach out to new people. Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead, the directors of Spring, have put together their own little video showing off their grass-roots promotion for the film; check it out below. Read More »

Roar trailer

“No animals were harmed in the making of this movie. 70 members of the cast and crew were.” That’s the most eye-catching tagline we’ve seen in years, and it is for the movie Roar, originally released in 1981 and set to return to theaters via Drafthouse Films in April. The Roar trailer will give you a good first look at the movie, and probably make you wonder who was insane enough to make it. Read More »

Spring trailer

Spring was one of the movies that had the most people talking at Fantastic Fest last year, and it was the one I was most bummed to miss. It comes from writer/directors Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead, who previously made the intense and unsettling film Resolution, and features Lou Taylor Pucci as an American backpacker who meets a beguiling young woman (Nadia Hilker) in Italy… and then discovers that she has secrets that set her apart from every other girl he’s ever met. This Spring trailer is pretty great, starting off with a pretty normal tone before getting really weird. Check it out below. Read More »

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Amira & Sam

Martin Starr has been all over the place since Freaks & Geeks, but more often than not he’s relegated to a supporting role as a geeky weirdo. It’s a treat, then, to finally see him take center stage in Amira & Sam. And as a straightforward romantic lead, no less.

The charming trailer features Starr as an Army vet trying to re-adjust to civilian life in New York City. He befriends and then falls for a lively Iraqi woman (Dina Shihabi) suffering immigration troubles. Check out the Amira and Sam trailer after the jump.

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Why Don't You Play in Hell clip

Why Don’t You Play in Hell is the biggest, weirdest, most joyous ode to genre moviemaking you’ll see this year. Sion Sono created this film as a blend of hyper-violent gangster pictures, coming of age stories, and romantic comedy. It follows a group of amateur filmmakers who call themselves the Fuck Bombers as they encounter the most unusual yakuza clan battle you’ve ever seen. As the filmmaking gets get in the middle, they find themselves with the opportunity to film the gangsters in action — and on 35mm, no less.

The film opens today and to celebrate we’ve got an exclusive Why Don’t You Play in Hell clip, featuring a scene that really needs no setup or explanation. There’s also the red-band trailer, which will explain a bit more of the story, inasmuch as there’s any way to explain it. Read More »

Why Don't You Play In Hell Trailer

It’s easy enough to describe the story in Sion Sono‘s Why Don’t You Play in Hell — a skin-of-the-teeth filmmaking group calling itself the Fuck Bombers gets involved in a yakuza rivalry, and is given the opportunity to make the ultimate gangster movie by filming the collision between two gangs. But it is almost impossible to describe the total whackadoo spirit of the film, in which nothing seems out of bounds, and in which Sono never casts aside an idea as too difficult or out there. The Why Don’t You Play in Hell trailer only starts to get across just how fervent, energetic and entertainingly indulgent this movie can be, but it’s a good start. Read More »