Sporror

As the success of movies like Jordan Peele’s Get Out proves, the horror genre is still as vital as ever in 2017. The same can’t be said, however, of sports movies these days. While the ’90s was a golden age of relatively small scale movies about the struggles and successes of sports teams, the evolution of Hollywood’s business model (in which big budget movies increasingly rely on international audiences to turn a profit) has made it far more difficult to green light movies with a sports angle.

The clear solution: combine the two types of storytelling into a new genre called “sporror” that consists of scary movies set in the world of sports that star celebrity athletes. Naturally. I can’t believe something so blatantly obvious took this long to put into motion. It’s been right in front of our eyes the whole time!
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Redbox

Despite facing competition from countless streaming websites and video-on-demand rentals from cable channels, Redbox isn’t planning to go anywhere.

The DVD rental company — which allows you to rent brand new movie releases at $1.50 per day for DVDs (and $2 per day for Blu-ray titles) from kiosks located at your local supermarket or grocery store — is planning a massive expansion in 2017, adding a whopping 1,500 kiosks at strategic locations across the U.S. in 2017. This will add to their base of 40,000 kiosks the company already has active.

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tupac shakur documentary

We’re going to be getting tons of hip-hop icon Tupac Shakur in our theaters soon, with the upcoming biopic All Eyez on Me, and now a fully authorized feature length documentary helmed by Steve McQueen, the director of 12 Years a Slave.

This will be the first documentary from the director of Hunger and Shame, though he will be joined by producer and musical documentary veteran Nigel Sinclair, who was behind such films as The Beatles: Eight Days A Week–The Touring Years.

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David Lynch is No Longer Directing Movies

david lynch quits movie directing

David Lynch, who was once dubbed “the most important filmmaker of the current era,” is throwing in the towel for movie-making.

Lynch confirmed that his last feature film will be 2006’s Inland Empire, which starred Laura Dern as an actress who loses grip with reality after she starts to inhabit her characters. Though he’s now back to working in television with the upcoming revival of his cult classic Twin Peaks, it’s yet to be seen whether Lynch will make a permanent move to television like many other influential mid-budget filmmakers.

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warner bros

Winds of change must be blowing in Burbank, because Warner Bros. has shifted a ton of release dates for films on the studio’s upcoming slate. The Scooby-Doo reboot and WB’s own clash of the titans, Godzilla vs. Kong, are just a couple of the films caught in the crossfire. Break out your red pens and prepare to update your calendars.
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writers guild strike

There won’t be a writers strike, thanks to a tentative new deal reached by Writers Guild negotiators and representatives from the Association of Motion Picture and Television Producers.

Hollywood (and film and TV viewers) can breathe a sigh of relief, as writers return to work as usual Tuesday, allowing productions to continue uninterrupted. But more importantly, the writers themselves have hopefully earned what they deserve.

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Orange is the New Black s5

This past weekend, a hacker attempted to extort Netflix into paying a ransom fee that would prevent the hacker from releasing the first ten episodes of Orange of the New Black season 5 to torrent sites ahead of the show’s official premiere next month. Netflix did not comply with those demands, and the hacker followed through on the threat. But it appears as if the thief isn’t finished making trouble yet. Here’s what we know about the Netflix hack so far.
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writer's strike

With a May 2 negotiating deadline right around the corner, a push from plenty of writers via social media, and an overwhelming vote yesterday in favor of authorizing a strike, it’s safe to assume that the Writers Guild of America (WGA) may again go on the picket line, aiming for fairer wages and a better health care plan. If you want more the details on why the guild is prepared to strike, we wrote a primer on everything you need to know.

WGA strikes aren’t entirely uncommon: in the last 60 years, they’ve gone on strike four times, the longest one taking 155 days in 1988. Most recently, the WGA went on strike for 100 days between November 2007 and February 2008. Because the landscape of film and TV had changed drastically since the 1988 strike, the impact on audiences was felt a little bit more notably. Relative to the current situation, looking back at the 2007-08 strike may offer a peek into what we can expect as audience members, presuming that the WGA goes on strike again next week.

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Netflix in theaters

Amazon made a big splash at this year’s Academy Awards, with Manchester by the Sea winning Oscars for Best Actor and Best Original Screenplay. Pundits cited Amazon’s theatrical model as having a big impact on that film’s wins, while another major streaming site, Netflix, has struggled to achieve similar awards outside of the documentary categories – perhaps due to its more limited theatrical distribution.

But Netflix’s new quarterly earnings report implies that changes could be brewing, and audiences may have the chance to see Netflix original movies on the big screen as well as at home.
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Cool Posts From Around the Web:

writer's strike.pngAt this point, your memories of the 2007-2008 WGA strike might be fuzzy. You might remember Tina Fey holding a picket sign, or Conan O’Brien spinning his wedding ring on television after his writing staff walked away. But otherwise? That was ten years ago. We had just gotten iPhones for the first time, the last Harry Potter book was out, and honestly, everything else is kind of a blur.

But those memories are about to come flooding back as the Writers Guild of America considers another potential strike. Today, the WGA will finalize a strike-authorization vote. If its members vote to authorize, the guild has the power to call a strike. It’ll do just that if ongoing contract negotiations break down between the WGA and the Alliance of Motion Pictures and Television Producers (AMPTP). Should that happen, the strike would commence as early as May 2.

Now what does all that mean, exactly? We’re glad you asked. Here’s a basic rundown. 

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