The following article was a collaboration between David Chen, Peter Sciretta, and Germain Lussier.

Between those of us at /Film, we’ve already seen The Dark Knight Rises several times and have found that many questions and problems still linger in our minds (see Dave’s review and Germain’s review). What’s consistently baffling about Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight trilogy is people’s willingness to forgive Nolan for extremely problematic staging and editing, and for screenwriting crimes that would put any other writer/director in “script jail.”

What follows are the 15 biggest issues we had with The Dark Knight Rises. Some of these are major problems with the film, while others are minor niggles. But they all have one thing in common: they all jolted us out of the film and took away from our ability to get lost in Nolan’s world. We wrote this piece not to troll, but simply to articulate some of our own issues with the film and hold them up for examination. Two warnings before you proceed: 1) MAJOR SPOILERS FOLLOW, 2) If you think you’ll be upset by this article, based just on the title, it’s probably a good idea if you just pass this one by.

Read More »

.

Please Recommend /Film on Facebook

Anatomy of a Scene: Knowing’s Plane Crash

Editor’s Note: You probably know Alex Proyas as the director of films like The Crow, Dark City, Garage Days, I Robot and Knowing, but for the last few weeks the filmmaker has been guest blogging on /Film. The post below is his last column. Later this week he will answer some of the questions submitted by /Film readers. Also, be sure to click after the jump to see a clip of the completed plane crash sequence.

knowing plane

One of my most challenging scenes in Knowing is the plane crash. I believe it was essential to have one of the predictions come true early on in the story, something so real and so horrible that we could no longer ignore the list of numbers.

I filmed this scene in one shot with a single hand-held camera. A nearly 3 minute continuous take where nearly everything in shot bloews up or catches fire. There was absolutely no room for even the smallest error. I wanted to take the audience right into the depths of that horrible environment with Nic. It took nearly 2 days to set up, and I must say that I’m really happy with the way it turned out.

Read More »

My Influences

Editor’s Note: You probably know Alex Proyas as the director of films like The Crow, Dark City, Garage Days, I Robot and Knowing, but for the next week and a half the filmmaker has agreed to become a guest blogger on /Film. I asked Alex to blog about some of his influences, and you can now read the resulting blog post below.

alex proyas

I was too young to see The Exorcist in its first run at the theaters, but I remember reading the novel and being scared to death. Many years later when I was able to see the film, its impact was no less potent. I love thrillers with a spiritual aspect… simply because it centers around a danger out of human control. Sell the initial concept (brilliantly achieved by BLATTY), and you have the potential to create some of the most thrilling moments possible. Forget about the scary beats and cheap jumps which sustain most modern thrillers and horrors – I like a film that prolongs tension for so long that even a quick scene cut to a girl lying in bed with special effects makeup scares the hell out of you.

Read More »

Revisiting Dark City

Editor’s Note: You probably know Alex Proyas as the director of films like The Crow, Dark City, Garage Days, I Robot and Knowing, but for the next couple weeks the filmmaker has agreed to become a guest blogger on /Film. Proyas will be blogging a couple times a week, talking about his inspirations, the state of sci-fi cinema, Dark City, and his upcoming film Knowing.

dark city

Peter asked if I wouldn’t mind re-visiting Dark City. It has been over 10 years since I completed the film, though the recent director’s cut was an interesting process to go through. It was fascinating going back and watching the old cuts of the film before they were “tweaked” to satisfy test audiences and studio pressure. I was surprised to see a much more confident and satisfying film before it was compromised.

Although we have made huge leaps and bounds in terms of technology and visual effects, I think the reason why this film seems to hold up today is because of its ideas. I think it resonates even more so today than it did all those years ago.

Read More »

/Film Gets a New Blogger – Director Alex Proyas

Editor’s Note: You probably know Alex Proyas as the director of films like The Crow, Dark City, Garage Days, I Robot and Knowing, but for the next few weeks the filmmaker has agreed to become a guest blogger on /Film. Proyas will be blogging a couple times a week, talking about his inspirations, the state of sci-fi cinema, Dark City, and his upcoming film Knowing. Below you can find a quick introduction post from Alex. Enjoy.

alex proyas

I hope you might find what I have to say about my new movie interesting, and if you don’t – well, feel free to press the page-back tab and read something more to your liking on /Film. Otherwise, check-in once in a while ‘cause I’ll be doing 5 entries all up – the last one will be a Q&A with /Film readers based on any questions you leave in the comments section.

For those of you who don’t know, I have a new film coming out on 20 March called KNOWING. It stars Nic Cage in a role I guarantee you haven’t seen him in before. I think he does a great job and I’m sure when you see the film, you’ll agree.

Read More »

Not much is known about Judd Apatow‘s next film Funny People, that is until now. /Film brings you an exclusive look at the cast and characters of Apatow’s new film. Some photos courtesy of liezl was here.

Adam Sandler plays a 42-year old comic named George Simmons. He’s had a good run, and even had a nice movie career. He has everything you could want: an expensive car, a big house, and a great sense of humor. The women want him and the guys want to be his friend. He knows a lot of people but has no close friends, probably because he’s a very miserable and self-involved person. One day he learns that he has a rare untreatable blood disorder, and only has six months to a year left to live. This is the the beginning of the film. Pretty good hook, eh?

Read More »

Five Infamous Fake Pornos (As Seen In Films)


With Kevin Smith’s latest film, Zack and Miri Make a Porno, hitting theaters this Friday, we at /Film thought it might be a good time to take a look back at the history of fictional pornographic movies. Typically, unless the movie you are watching is itself a porno, porn plays a minor role in films, skirting around the edges and marginally infusing the proceedings with a dollop of sexuality. However, the following pornos have all in some way wormed their way into becoming major plot devices for (mostly) memorable movies. Here are five of the most infamous fake pornos, as seen in films:

Porno: Logjammin’

As Seen In: The Big Lebowski

Remember when Tara Reid was still considered sexy? Neither do I, but apparently at some indeterminate time in the past, Reid was seen as hot enough to be tapped for the role of trophy wife and porn star in the Coen brothers hilarious stoner comedy, The Big Lebowski. In one of the pivotal scenes in this film’s labyrinthine plot, Maude Lebowski and the Dude come to the realization that the Nihilists aren’t actually involved in kidnapping Reid’s character, Bunny, at all!

This porno begins to answers questions we never even wanted to ask. What does Tara Reid look like in a porn film? What are the physical mechanics of efficient German lovemaking? Who would possibly want to see Peter Stormare naked? Either way, Julianne Moore’s brilliant deadpan commentary make this porno one for the books.

Read More »

The following is a counter-point movie review by Francisco Saco. You can read Peter Sciretta’s original positive review at this link.

Live Free or Die Hard

The announcement of a new installment in the Die Hard series caused a wave of deep skepticism to wash over me. The fact that every geriatric actor in Hollywood has decided to once again take on the roles that made them household names is an insult to all fans of their original work. An obvious ploy to milk the new generation of filmgoers for all their milk money, these new and updated continuations usually fall short of their predecessors, turning away veteran fans at the expense of trying to make new and younger ones with more buying power.  With all this said, knowing that an aged Bruce Willis was to reprise the classic role of Detective John McClane was a bit unsettling when I first heard of it. Nevertheless, as a devout follower of the first three films in the series, especially the first and the third parts, I attended the screening on opening day.

Read More »

Click Here To Read Older Movie News
Cool Posts From Around the Web: