p3yv1gicm9aaq7ntczfd

We all have a movie that we consider to be “ours.” Whether it be the one that our family showed us as kids, the one we saw on a dark stormy night at a sleepover, or one we just discovered on TV, everyone eventually finds a movie that is as much a part of them as their own vital organs. This seems especially true if that beloved movie of yours maybe isn’t exactly loved by everyone else in the world.

This is where the term of “cult” comes into play. By definition, a “cult following” signifies a group of individuals with an incredible amount of passion for a specific aspect of culture. And with so many books, TV series, Broadway shows and movies that never really got the kind of respect their fandom thinks they deserved, the amount of titles that fall into “cult” category is becoming more and more frequent these days. The internet has only helped build cult followings all the faster.

How do we fall in love with a movie like this? Does the cult film choose us or was it destined for us in the stars long ago? Does it involve how our parents raised us and what fundamentally makes us the individuals we become?  I will now ask you to take a deep breath and travel with me to a slightly embarrassing time and place, the time when I (covered in raccoon eye liner) discovered the movie that changed me: Brian De Palma’s Phantom of the Paradise.

Read More »

Stranger Things 2 Defense

(Welcome to The Unpopular Opinion, a series where a writer goes to the defense of a much-maligned film or show or sets their sights on something seemingly beloved by all. In this edition: an argument that Stranger Things season 2 is a vast improvement over season 1.)

To say Netflix’s Stranger Things has become the love of my TV life might be the understatement of the decade. Featuring every bit of the ’80s that made my childhood magical, and one heck of an amazing cast, it fulfilled that hole in my TV life that no other new show could. But ever since I finished my first viewing of season 1, there has been one question that has plagued me  – could the Duffer Brothers deliver a “sequel” that was just as good as the first installment of their story?

While the rest of the /Film crew found themselves disappointed with the new season, I was definitely won over. In fact, I’m a proud believer that Stranger Things 2 is better than its predecessor for a multitude of reasons.

Read More »

A Guide to Cinema’s 10 Greatest Spooky Romances

addams family

When people are looking for movies to watch during the Halloween season, their eyes are often turned to the Horror genre. But what about the other emotional aspects of what many (including yours truly) considers “The Most Wonderful Time of the Year”? And more importantly, what about…love?

That’s right, All Hallow’s Eve can be quite the time for some romance to be in the air! From doomed couples to those who found love because of their quirks and oddities, this holiday of monsters and ghouls can be a great time to explore some of cinema’s greatest (and spookiest) romances.

Read More »

amblimation logo

(Welcome to Nostalgia Bomb, a series where we take a look back on beloved childhood favorites and discern whether or not they’re actually any good. In this edition: we revisit the films of Amblimation, the short-lived animation arm of Steven Spielberg‘s Amblin Entertainment.)

When you stroll down your personal movie memory lane, certain titles bring you back to a specific place and time. For me, I always travel back to my grandmother’s living room carpet. I can still feel the dusty fibers between my tiny fingers – this was my movie zone. And in that space, my most vivid memories revolve around the creations of a specific studio: Amblimation. Despite only making three movies, they captured my heart and imagination.

So in this edition of Nostalgia Bomb, let’s go on a journey to explore this short-lived animation studio. A journey that involves a mouse, a group of dinosaurs, and a heroic wolf/dog. There will be laughs, tears, and James Horner. But this is also the story of the struggles of ’90s animation. Because even though it may look pretty, and have Steven Spielberg involved, there are definitely bumps on the cinematic road to glory.

Read More »

ducktalescrew

Being a kid of the ’90s, I discovered Ducktales near the end of its popularity. Though my Disney Afternoon interest leaned more towards Chip and Dale Rescue Rangers or Gargoyles, it was always obvious that there was something special about Ducktales. With Indiana Jones style adventure and the humor of the McDuck crew, Scrooge and his family never lost their sparkle.

But since I didn’t really get to experience Ducktales in its heyday, I was excited to check out the new reboot on Disney XD. And with a promising cast (including Doctor Who‘s David Tennant as our favorite billionaire duck) and some very interesting character designs, this seemed like one very promising project.

Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

War for the Planet of the Apes beach

Back in the ’90s, my dad would take me on a frequent trip to Blockbuster Video (may it rest in peace). There, I became educated on one of his favorite franchises franchises, Planet of the Apeswhich in turn became one of my favorite film franchises. Over the years of watching and rewatching these classic movies, certain scenes stand out above the others, the moments that help define my love of the entire Apes series.

And with War for the Planet of the Apes arriving this week, this is a great opportunity to talk about them. From the scenes that helped make the series the success it is today to the more recent highlights, let’s take a look the best of the best, and maybe you’ll get why moviegoers have always gone “ape” for these movies (I’m so sorry).

Read More »

Examining 10 Great Motion Capture Characters

War for the Planet of the Apes Caesar Andy Serkis

Motion capture is quite the filmmaking tool these days. It takes us to new and extraordinary worlds of fantasy and adventure, introducing us to characters we thought the world of movies could never allow us to meet. So in celebration of War for the Planet of the Apeslet’s explore some incredible protagonists and antagonists who proved how amazing mo-cap can be. From beasts to aliens to even regular humans, this tech allows actors to become just about anything.

Read More »

hercules disney

(Welcome to Nostalgia Bomb, a series where we take a look back on beloved childhood favorites and discern whether or not they’re actually any good. In this edition: a look back at Disney’s post-rennaisance animated output, including The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Mulan, and Hercules.)

When people think of Disney, they often jump to the classics – Bambi, Dumbo, Snow White, and so on. But my generation has a different list. We were raised on the studio’s late ’80s and early ’90s “renaissance” titles, including Beauty and the Beast, The Little Mermaid, Aladdin, and The Lion King. But after 1995, the seemingly unstoppable Disney animation machine began to slow down. The films of the late ’90s live on as childhood favorites, not undisputed classics.

And that brings me to the question of the moment: some 20 years later, do these later films of the renaissance era hold up? Are their charms enough to cover their bigger flaws? Is it all nostalgia or are some of these true cinematic gems? Please keep your arms, feet and legs inside the vehicle at all times, because we’re about to take a trip to the late-’90s era of the House of Mouse.

Read More »

Baby Driver Music Featurette

In 2005, I watched a new horror comedy titled Shaun of the Dead. I had not heard of Edgar Wright, Simon Pegg, or anyone involved with this quirky little piece of entertainment. And something struck me big time about this movie: the incredible editing and music choices. And since Shaun‘s release, Wright has proven that he is a master at mixing cinema with the energy of a music video, all the while not losing his grip on the story.

In Wright’s latest movie, Baby Driver, music plays a key role within both the story and structure of the movie. And if you know Wright’s filmography, you know that he has been honing his music video talents for years to create a film like this. So in celebration of Baby Driver‘s release, let’s take a look at the greatest music-driven sequences in Wright’s movies.

Read More »

Lessons to Learn on the Batman and Robin 20th Anniversary

Often when we look at movies that defined our youth, we attempt to cling onto some aspect of nostalgia that can repair any visible flaws. Maybe it saved you from the boredom of summer. Maybe it kept you company during a sick day at home. Everyone has that movie, the one they will defend against any sort of criticism, and for the longest time (until I turned into some form of grown adult), that movie was Batman & Robin. 

Now, looking back on it 20 years later, it is quite clear that my tastes have changed since June of 1997. No longer am I entertained by Uma Thurman dancing in a gorilla get-up, nor do I accept that dumbed-down version of Barbara Gordon, and I can now completely confirm that I will absolutely, one hundred percent, never register for a Bat Credit Card.

But there is a much more deeper question to ask when it comes to this anniversary post: what can we actually learn from Batman & Robin? Is it an important film in the legacy of DC’s live action adaptation history? Well chill, because we’re going to examine this one from top-to-bottom. Let’s explore the good, the bad, and the Bane of Joel Schumacher’s “masterpiece” and what it has taught the comic book genre over the years. Instead of hating it, maybe we can thank Papa Joel for giving us a guidebook on what Batman movies shouldn’t be.

Read More »