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bad day for the cut trailer

Much like how the Sundance Film Festival itself helps set the stage for every other film festival in the year that follows, the fest’s Midnight category helps to gauge what we can expect from independent genre cinema over the next twelve months or so. While I’m not attending Sundance (our own Peter Sciretta, Angie Han, and Ethan Anderton will be bringing you reviews over the coming week!), this is the section I tend to keep the closest eye on. Sundance has premiered plenty of unforgettable, and often gnarly, movies after the sane people have gone to sleep.

So that brings us to the trailer for Bad Day For the Cut, an Irish thriller that looks like it’ll be right at home with the after-hours crowd. It has everything you need: Revenge! Violence! Thick accents! A Game of Thrones veteran!

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shaft reboot director

It’s been well over a year since we heard anything about the new version of Shaft that New Line has been cooking up with screenwriters Kenya Barris and Alex Barnow, but now we know that Tim Story will be sitting the director’s chair.

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Deidra & Laney Rob a Train trailer

Sundance is now in full swing, which means those of you at home might be feeling festival envy right about now. But the good news is that we won’t have long to wait until some of this year’s promising features get released. As a matter of fact, we’re less than two months away from seeing Deidra & Laney Rob a Train, which was first announced by Netflix last year.

The film, directed by Sydney Freeland, is exactly what it says on the package: it’s about two girls named Deidra (Ashleigh Murray) and Laney (Rachel Crow) who decide to start robbing trains. They hatch the plan in order to make ends meet after their mother is thrown in jail, and it looks like they turn out to be actually pretty good at it. Unfortunately, their heists are so successful that they catch the attention of a detective (Tim Blake Nelson), who sets out to find these mystery bandits. Watch the Deidra & Laney Rob a Train trailer below.  Read More »

y the last man tv series

If you asked me to assemble a list of my favorite comic series of all time, books that I would recommend to anyone, even people who weren’t comic book fans, writer Brian K. Vaughan and artist Pia Guerra‘s Y: The Last Man would probably land somewhere near the top of the list. It’s a stirring adventure story, a brutally honest coming-of-age tale, and one of the most politically charged and thoughtful post-apocalyptic narratives ever told. And don’t get me started on that perfect final issue. Seriously. I’ll start blubbering like a baby.

So I greeted the news that FX was looking to develop the comic into a television series with the mix of excitement and skepticism that I greet any upcoming adaptation of something I love. And while it’s still early days yet, we do have an update on the show.

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the wailing remake

You should go watch The Wailing.

Unless subtitles make your eyes bleed and you hate terrifying movies, you have no excuse. Na Hong-jin‘s sprawling horror epic is currently streaming on Netflix, so wait until it gets dark outside, make yourself a snack, carve out 156 minutes, and hit play. Because man, this movie is something else. I’m not even sure how to begin to describe it, but I feel confident that it’s a movie that could only be set in South Korea and made by South Korean filmmakers.

In other news, it’s currently being considered for an American remake. Huh.

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Anne Hathaway in Colossal teaser

Even if you’re a monster movie aficionado, it’s likely you’ve never seen one quite like Nacho Vigalondo‘s ColossalAnne Hathaway stars as Gloria, whose charm helps paper over the fact that she’s a total mess. Unemployed and freshly single, she moves back to her hometown and reconnects with an old friend (Jason Sudeikis) who becomes her new drinking buddy.

So far, it sounds like just another quarter-life crisis indie dramedy, right? But Gloria, it turns out, shares a mysterious connection to a giant monster that’s been rampaging through Seoul. As the truth of the situation dawns on her, Gloria must figure out how to stop it from spiraling completely out of control. Watch the Colossal teaser below. Read More »

John Lee Hancock interview

The Founder doesn’t resemble the often feel-good stories of some of John Lee Hancock‘s previous films, such as Saving Mr. BanksThe Rookie, or The Blind Side. At the end of the day, this is a story of the good guys losing. Depending on who you ask, there’s little that’s inspiring about Ray Kroc’s (Michael Keaton) success story.

The Founder is a biopic that doesn’t champion, idolize, or demonize its subject; it’s a warts-and-all portrait of an unimaginative but ambitious (or greedy) man with a hunger for success. He achieved the American dream by destroying Dick (Nick Offerman) and Mac McDonald’s (John Carroll Lynch) dream. They’re the heroes of the story — always pure in their intentions — but they don’t come out on top.

In one thrilling sequence, Mac explains how McDonald’s got started over dinner. It’s a lengthy, dialogue-heavy scene that communicates history and backstory, helps strengthen Dick and Mac’s loving relationship, and moves along at such a fast pace. This scene, which was written by Robert D. Siegel (The Wrestler), is where we began our recent conversation with Hancock.

Below, check out our John Lee Hancock interview.

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sterling k. brown

Sterling K. Brown is having a moment. He won a well-deserved Emmy for playing prosecutor Christopher Darden in American Crime Story: The People v. O.J. Simpson, a tricky role that required him to radiate intelligence and charisma while also portraying a man who makes all kinds of poor choices. He immediately followed that with a lead role on This is Us, which has become a big hit for NBC. And like any actor having a moment, he’s been sucked into the world of comic book movies with a role in the upcoming Black Panther.

And the hot streak continues with Shane Black’s The Predator.

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A Series of Unfortunate Events

Netflix’s adaptation of A Series of Unfortunate Events is pure Lemony Snicket (a.k.a. Daniel Handler). The author wrote much of season one, based on the first four entries in his 13-part series, and he’s remained appropriately faithful to his melancholic stories. The Netflix series doesn’t shy away from the darker themes found in the Baudelaire children’s journey, but it does go for considerably more laughs than the 2004 film adaptation, making it an entertainingly peculiar mix of slapstick and sadness.

Below, read our A Series of Unfortunate Events review (Spoilers follow).

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I Don't Feel at Home in This World Anymore Review - Melanie Lynskey

Director Jeremy Saulnier has delivered chills, thrills and blood spills at the Sundance Film Festival before. His film, Blue Ruin, featured the relatively unknown actor Macon Blair setting out to track down the people who killed his parents and deliver his vengeance upon them. It appears some of Jeremy Saulnier’s filmmaking style has rubbed off on his leading man as Blair has returned to Sundance, this time as the writer and director of own twisted tale of revenge.

I Don’t Feel at Home in This World Anymore (which honestly needs a new title) stars the endlessly charming Melanie Lynskey (Up in the Air, Win Win) as Ruth, a woman who is fed up with people being assholes. It’s that simple. One day, she comes home to find that her house has been broken into, with the thieves having stolen her laptop, a set of silver she inherited from her grandmother, and some prescription medication for depression and anxiety. When it becomes clear that the police are basically doing nothing to help her, she decides to take matters into her own hands.

Read on for our full I Don’t Feel at Home in This World Anymore review. Read More »